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Thursday, January 31, 2008
Due to the new Got Feedback? program, we have disabled commenting on this page. This page was part of a pilot program that has evolved and this page is no longer needed. You are still welcome to leave general feedback on our blog, or you can visit our Got Feedback? page and leave specific feedback with a Customer Service Manager from any one of our 450+ airports.

Thanks,

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Comments

Submitted by Anonymous on

Why do I have airline crewmembers step in frotn of me so they can be searched....and WHY are they being searched -- THEY'RE flying the airplane!! Seems to be a waste of TSA's time and resources as well as an unnecessary delay for the passengers. Don't the airline crewmembers have some sort of positive ID in this day and age to bypass this unnecessary procedure...and if not, why not?

Submitted by DoogieSD on

There are so many gates and checkpoints in this airport it should be the model of all Airports...

No matter what terminal at DFW I have flown in or out of the TSA there have got it down to a science...I call DFW the perfect smoke break layover...I can be in one terminal and make my fight in the next and still have time to step outside and get a breath of "fresh air"...

Very professional and efficient staff...Great work!

Submitted by Anonymous on

Air Crew are subjected to screening just as passengers are. This practice has occured since the late 80's when an airline employee bypassed security at a checkpoint, smuggled a pistol on board, and killed his flight attendant girlfriend en route to their destination.

Submitted by Anonymous on

1. Travel from DFW on 19 Mar 2008.
2. I hand over my Boarding Pass and DD Form 2 (Retired United States Armed Services ID Card)
3. I'm told by the TSA Screener that he needs a "Driver's License or other Photo ID"

Since when is a valid (WITH Photo) Retired U.S. Army ID not acceptable ?

Submitted by Anonymous on
1. Travel from DFW on 19 Mar 2008.
2. I hand over my Boarding Pass and DD Form 2 (Retired United States Armed Services ID Card)
3. I'm told by the TSA Screener that he needs a "Driver's License or other Photo ID"

Since when is a valid (WITH Photo) Retired U.S. Army ID not acceptable ?

You should feel lucky that they didn't confiscate your ID and have you arrested for being in the possession of a fake ID. Insert heavy note of sarcasm.

Many TSA/TSO types lack the ability to read your ID card and as such are only keyed to examine a state driver's license.
Submitted by Mike on

You are correct a DD form 2 is a valid form of photo I.D. This sounds like a training issue. If this happens again just ask to speak with a supervisor after you process through security. If we dont know we cant fix it.

Mike

Submitted by Anonymous on

Mike wrote:

"This sounds like a training issue. If this happens again just ask to speak with a supervisor after you process through security. If we dont know we cant fix it."

He's telling you here, so you know. If you look at the comments throughout the blog and elsewhere on the web a common complaint is that TSO's do not understand:

Military ID's
Passports
Government ID's that do not expire

It has happened at multiple airports and been reported multiple times. No one wants to ask for a supervisor at the airport because they believe that if they do they will be treated as a hostile and sent for secondary screening or worse humiliations.

A good use for this feedback would be to do a top-down instruction that all TSOs should get some remedial training on IDs.

Suggestions that passengers talk to supervisors at the airport are less than useful. Until the TSA cleans up its act to the point that passengers *trust* your front line staff change is going to have to come from the top.

Submitted by Anonymous on

"anonymous said:

Air Crew are subjected to screening just as passengers are."

No they are not. For example, they are not required to remove their shoes and are permitted to carry liquids in excess of 100ml through the checkpoint.

Submitted by Anonymous on

The negative passenger experience seems mostly related to the TSA personnel rather than the policies. Sure, the policies can be one more little hassle to deal with, but most people get irritated when unmotivated and un-concerned TSA folks herd them like cattle through, what I often see as, random, unpredictable, and arbitrary security procedures. I think a lot of animosity could be helped with better education of TSA employees and treating people like people, like giving some sort of explanation for the security procedures, no need to give away "state secrets" just a "you can take 3 ounces of water and not 4 onboard because..." Is it hard to effectively protect everyone from terrorist masterminds, make the process easy and painless, and handle disgruntled passengers, all on this scale? Sure it is. But this is the wealthiest and most powerful government in the history of the planet. You put a man on the moon and beat the Nazis, I'm sure you can get the kinks in the TSA worked out.

Also, DFW is pretty good.

Submitted by Anonymous on

I AM A FEDERAL AGENT AUTHORIZED TO CARRY A FIREARM ON COMMERCIAL AIRCRAFT. MY SPOUSE IS AN EMPLOYEE OF AMERICAN AIRLINES. AS SUCH, I OFTEN TRAVEL IN A "NON-REVENUE" CAPACITY. HOWEVER, ACCORDING TO AMERICAN AIRLINES, I AM NOT AUTHORIZED TO CARRY A FIREARM IN A NON-REVENUE CAPACITY. HERE IS THE KICKER...I CAN WALK UP TO THE TICKET COUNTER...PURCHASE A TICKET..AND AMAZINGLY, I BECOME AUTHORIZED TO CARRY A FIREARM. LAST I CHECKED, AMERICAN AIRLINES LOST TWO PLANES RESULTING IN THE DEATHS OF THOUSANDS. ONE WOULD THINK AMERICAN AIRLINES WOULD WELCOME AN ARMED FEDERAL AGENT, NOT OBSTRUCT ONE. SHAME ON AMERICAN AIRLINES AND THEIR POLICIES.

Submitted by Anonymous on

I had a great time at DFW, however, just recently at Indianapolis (and I have noticed this elsewhere especially smaller airports) that TSA/ TSO personnel RACIALLY profile passaengers for secondary screening regardless of whether they meet any criteria of a threat. I am going to sound anti- white here even though I am half white, but EVERY white passanger in line before and after me whizzed right by no, I mean NEVER did they ask them anything or do anything to them. Every minority was detained for secondary inspection. Now I realize that minorities get through all the time without problems, however observing the line while going to Subway (In the Delta Terminal) every minority was stopped for secondary. Its very troubling because a white person can be just as likely to be a terrorist I mean haven't we seen the WHITE Americans who go join Al Qaeda on the news? Obviously it doesnt happen in droves, it does happen and the possibility is there for a WHITE American to do the same deed that any capable Arabic- middle eastern lookin person can do. I think that the TSO's at smaller airports need to be commissioned and grilled by HQ in DC if HQ sincerely does not racially profile. (Remember that Boston Logan Airport was not as big as a OHare or DFW and still half the hijackers used that airport on 9/11 so smaller airports would likely be their preference for any future attack without regard to race because bare in mind these are the same people who use women AND CHILDREN in bombings so whats not say they cant use a white American for example?)

Submitted by Robert on

I regularly fly out of DFW, and find the TSA staff there to be dis-courteous, unprofessional, hostile and arrogant. They imagine themselves police officers and treat everyone like suspects. I have provided this feedback on the comment cards to TSA and no corrective action is taken.

Submitted by Anonymous on

"This sounds like a training issue. If this happens again just ask to speak with a supervisor after you process through security. If we dont know we cant fix it."

This response shows the TSA's lack of willingness to be proactive. The passengers should not have to be the TSA's QA department, especially given the negative reactions of TSA personnel to any perceived challenge.

Where are the supervisors who should be monitoring what is going on during their watch? The supervisors should be held accountable for all that happens or fails to happen in their area of cognizance.

As usual, the TSA puts the pain and consequences of its actions and failures to act onto the flying public, instead of taking responsibility itself.

We teach children to take responsibility, so why can't the TSA take responsibility?

Submitted by Anonymous on

robert said...
I regularly fly out of DFW, and find the TSA staff there to be dis-courteous, unprofessional, hostile and arrogant. They imagine themselves police officers and treat everyone like suspects. I have provided this feedback on the comment cards to TSA and no corrective action is taken.

I was just hired onto TSA at DFW, still in training. They have taught us that YES, we are supposed to treat every passenger as suspect. We treat every single passenger as if they were the ONLY passenger to come through the checkpoint all day. And I quote, "The terrorists only have to be right one time, on one day. However, all of you, the officers, have to be right EVERY TIME, EVERY DAY. 24/7/365. We have no idea when it is going to happen, where it is going to happen, how it is going to happen, or even why it is going to happen. The only thing that we do know, is that it WILL happen.

We come to work every day because...

We are The Power of One.
We are United.
We are America.

Never Forget.

Submitted by Anonymous on
I was just hired onto TSA at DFW, still in training. They have taught us that YES, we are supposed to treat every passenger as suspect.

This isn't the USA I grew up in. This isn't the USA whose military I served in.

Treat every passenger as a suspect?

Kip any comments on this? We American tax payers want a full accounting on this comment.
Submitted by Anonymous on

It disgusts me to see these comments regarding security and the supposedly uneducated screeners. There is quite a bit of educated personnel within our ranks from the lowest end (which is a screener) to upper management, but to assume we are all uneducated is quite ignorant. The majority of us have degrees in various subjects or we come highly decorated from various branches of the Armed Forces (you know those people who fight for our freedom), we chose this agency to assist any way we can in ensuring the American public a safe passage. We are targeted on a daily basis from passengers and the media; put yourself in our shoes just for a moment and imagine screening up to 15,000 people and that is just on your shift (which is 8 hours)daily. Can you fathom that? There is 15,000 people coming through your area and you have to explain everything to divest, declare,conduct bag checks, hand wands, full body pat-downs and etc, for eight hours. Are you gong to make everyone happy? The answer is no, because most people come in the airports already upset about the process either something happened to them (once) or they heard various things from co-workers or friends and they are determined not to be happy about any part of the process. We have taken over document checking and identification which we provide 100% better than private companies; we also are conducting Screening Passengers by Observation Techniques, which if you read the TSA website have resulted in the capturing of known felons, persons that are trying to deceive the U.S govt with fraudulent documents and etc. In conclusion, we(screeners) are all human to, we put on our shoes one at a time just the same as you(passengers)if we could all treat each other with openness and respect we would not have these problems we have to day. Have a great day or evening.

CD (IAH)

Submitted by Anonymous on
It disgusts me to see these comments regarding security and the supposedly uneducated screeners.

They display either their lack of education or lack of common sense when dealing with the public.

There is quite a bit of educated personnel within our ranks from the lowest end (which is a screener) to upper management, but to assume we are all uneducated is quite ignorant.

True, but some do demonstrate an incredible lack of common sense and an incredible lack of skills when dealing with the public.

The majority of us have degrees in various subjects or we come highly decorated from various branches of the Armed Forces (you know those people who fight for our freedom), we chose this agency to assist any way we can in ensuring the American public a safe passage.

Having a degree and working as a screener makes me doubt the degree was worth much in the first place. Waving the flag doesn't do much for your argument either.

We are targeted on a daily basis from passengers and the media; put yourself in our shoes just for a moment and imagine screening up to 15,000 people and that is just on your shift (which is 8 hours)daily.

You elected to do that job. Stop complaining or find another line of work. When either you or one of your coworkers misbehaves/does actionable things/abuses traveling citizens you get the publicity you have earned. Right now the publicity you have earned is unpleasant.

Can you fathom that? There is 15,000 people coming through your area and you have to explain everything to divest, declare,conduct bag checks, hand wands, full body pat-downs and etc, for eight hours.

Agian your job.

Are you gong to make everyone happy? The answer is no, because most people come in the airports already upset about the process either something happened to them (once) or they heard various things from co-workers or friends and they are determined not to be happy about any part of the process.

I went through Schiphol recently and was amazed at how professionally those folks did their jobs (security and passport control). No yelling, no accusations, just a pleasant experience. I can't say that about some US airports (i.e. O'hare)

We have taken over document checking and identification which we provide 100% better than private companies;

If the private companies were able to perform at 5% and you are able to do it 100% better than the private companies then you are only able to do 10%. Try harder. Oh, and with your UV flashlights and jeweler's loops, you are just putting on a show.

we also are conducting Screening Passengers by Observation Techniques, which if you read the TSA website have resulted in the capturing of known felons, persons that are trying to deceive the U.S govt with fraudulent documents and etc.

How many terrorists have you stopped? How many running terror operations have been stopped at the airport by TSA? I suspect the answer is zero.

In conclusion, we(screeners) are all human to, we put on our shoes one at a time just the same as you(passengers)if we could all treat each other with openness and respect we would not have these problems we have to day. Have a great day or evening.

Okay, how about treating the passenger's person and property like it was valuable to them? How about not treating every person as a suspected terrorist? How about using your brains when dealing with the traveling public?
Submitted by Anonymous on

How about hiring TSA agents that give the impression that they care about their jobs. One, if they did not want the job please quit immediately. Two, most TSA agents give off the impression that the only thing they could deter is their food from escaping-maybe institute an exercise program. Three, if you give off a negative outlook there is a good chance you will receive that from your customer ie the flyer.

Submitted by Anonymous on

anonymous said....

I went through Schiphol recently and was amazed at how professionally those folks did their jobs (security and passport control). No yelling, no accusations, just a pleasant experience. I can't say that about some US airports (i.e. O'hare)

You failed to mention that at Schiphol they carry machine guns freely throughout the airport, carry themselves as though not a care in the world, and unless the Dutch government has changed (it has been 18 years) some of the same people we try to keep out of the United States (ummmm--terrorists) vacation in the Netherlands as long as they dont cause any problems. This may explain the easy transition through the airport.

Submitted by Anonymous on

TSA at DFW seems to think that they are second only to GOD. They understaff on days when they should expect to be busy.

They steal peoples valuables in the name of security. When you try to retrieve those valuables you are told you can have them back. I am not talking about days later, I am talking about just a couple of hours later.

The personnel at DFW are rude, and their supervisor out there is just aas rude. If people did their jobs like TSA personnel at DFW the coutry would be in a world of trouble.

I have flown in and out of many airports, and if I NEVER have to deal with TSA personnel at DFW again I will be very grateful.

Maybe TSA can get a grant to send these people back to nice school.

Submitted by Anonymous on

I have traveled with my son now 18 months for an aprox of 16 times through DFW. I have family in the state and my connections always end up there. I have never had any problem following the liquid rules since my son has been on formula since he was born. This past visit howvwer I had my first encounter with a less than friendly and accoumodating TSa agent and supervisor. I was flying out of AUS with a connection in DFW with a sick child. I had prepared his bottles with special "nursery "water and had the pwdered formula ready to be prepared. (You cant prepare them all at once since they go bad in less than an hour) When I went through screening, they as usual put the bag aside and go trough it. When the TSA agent found the bottles he commented that they water had to be tossed or the bottles prepared outside the screening are in order for me to proceed. I tried to explain that it was not regular water what was in them and that my son had a medical condition qhich required the use of that specific water and formula. I also explained that formula would go bad in one hour and I still had an 8 hour trip ahead of me. He also found a tube of desitin as well as tylenol al in the diaper bag. He said those would have to be disposed of as well since they were not in a ziploc bag. In the end he ended up tossing my water and letting me go in with desitin and tylenol. I had to buy regular water inside the airport which did not contain the electrolyes my son needed for his diarreah. When I went to the supervisor to explian my problem, she very rudely replied that those were the rules at that specific airport and if I didn't like them i should try flying out of a different airport. I would like to know why in 18 months of flying with a baby I have never had ANY problems with bottles or desitin for that matter. Is is true that each airport has their own rules and regulations? Is there anything I can do to prevent this from happening again? I sadly, don't have a choice as to which airport I fly out of, but I believe there should be a nationwide policy as to which liquids are necessary to travel with, especiallly in the case of a sick child.

Submitted by Anonymous on

I have traveled with my son now 18 months for an aprox of 16 times through DFW. I have family in the state and my connections always end up there. I have never had any problem following the liquid rules since my son has been on formula since he was born. This past visit howvwer I had my first encounter with a less than friendly and accoumodating TSa agent and supervisor. I was flying out of AUS with a connection in DFW with a sick child. I had prepared his bottles with special "nursery "water and had the pwdered formula ready to be prepared. (You cant prepare them all at once since they go bad in less than an hour) When I went through screening, they as usual put the bag aside and go trough it. When the TSA agent found the bottles he commented that they water had to be tossed or the bottles prepared outside the screening are in order for me to proceed. I tried to explain that it was not regular water what was in them and that my son had a medical condition qhich required the use of that specific water and formula. I also explained that formula would go bad in one hour and I still had an 8 hour trip ahead of me. He also found a tube of desitin as well as tylenol al in the diaper bag. He said those would have to be disposed of as well since they were not in a ziploc bag. In the end he ended up tossing my water and letting me go in with desitin and tylenol. I had to buy regular water inside the airport which did not contain the electrolyes my son needed for his diarreah. When I went to the supervisor to explian my problem, she very rudely replied that those were the rules at that specific airport and if I didn't like them i should try flying out of a different airport. I would like to know why in 18 months of flying with a baby I have never had ANY problems with bottles or desitin for that matter. Is is true that each airport has their own rules and regulations? Is there anything I can do to prevent this from happening again? I sadly, don't have a choice as to which airport I fly out of, but I believe there should be a nationwide policy as to which liquids are necessary to travel with, especiallly in the case of a sick child.

Submitted by Anonymous on
You failed to mention that at Schiphol they carry machine guns freely throughout the airport, carry themselves as though not a care in the world, and unless the Dutch government has changed (it has been 18 years) some of the same people we try to keep out of the United States (ummmm--terrorists) vacation in the Netherlands as long as they dont cause any problems. This may explain the easy transition through the airport.

Hmmm, had the same professionalism in Helsinki as well. As to the machinegun toting guards, they may have been there but weren't visible when I flew through there.

I set off the metal detector (steel toed shoes)and was given the chance to remove the shoes and pass through the metal detector without having the screeners go TSA on me.
Submitted by Anonymous on

I travel a lot. In the past two years alone, I flew through more than 18 airports. While Denver is a logistical nightmare, the worst is DFW. They may have worked out the logistics but the people working for TSA are the biggest bunch of arrogant, self important, abusive people in the business. They act like rent-a-cops, the security guards that wannabe cops. They want so badly to show you who's the boss. They show so little respect to the passengers that it taints the entire trip.

I have seen the police assisting at the stations and they look so embarrassed by the TSA's actions. If the TSA agents would take it from the police and learn how to be authoritative without being so facist.

I know this has to be a result of their management at DFW. Sure they can consider everybody like a suspect but they don't have to treat everybody like a convicted war criminal. I completely understand the need to give clear and direct instructions. It is the attitude and the demeaner that is exhibited when there is any kind of misunderstanding or event. The agents come out swinging. They start threatening people with arrest, detainment, or inablility to enter at all. All the poor lady did was wear her sweater through the check point, or the old guy put his shoes into the same bin as his computer, or the college kids from SMU tossed their caps back after they were told that was improper.

Its not just one station there. It is every check station at the airport. And there are some very nice people working there but they really need to get over themselves. Its the boss, ya gotta get rid of the boss.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Is there someway to teach the travellors the proper way, or just an easier way to travel? What I'm getting at is when certain travellor approach the checkpoints, they only start undressing right before they get to the machines. And they dress like they were very surprised that they were going to travel that day. They have pens, jewelery, PDAs, blackberries, metal studded belts, watches, rulers, water, juice, tiaras, etc all over their bodies.

When I travel on a plane, I put those things in my carry-on before I go to the checkpoint. I also travel with several people and they do the same thing. It is truly amazing to see how the line clears up when we go through so easily and quickly.

I know you have appointed the person with the worst possible voice to go yell about putting all their toiletries into a little bag but there has to be a better way to educate the public. If you could get a successful campaign going, it would make the waiting shorter, decrease frustration, and it might even make your TSA agents seem likeable.

I've seen the Today Show and others give supposed tips on how to get through but all they do is encourage the disrobing, or "de-metalling" immediately before the checkpoints. How about working with those type news shows, commercials or public service announcements, ads in USA Today and other such publications?

Submitted by Anonymous on
I tried to explain that it was not regular water what was in them and that my son had a medical condition qhich required the use of that specific water and formula. I also explained that formula would go bad in one hour and I still had an 8 hour trip ahead of me. He also found a tube of desitin as well as tylenol al in the diaper bag. He said those would have to be disposed of as well since they were not in a ziploc bag.

Any comments from anyone on TSA's staff? Beuller? Beuller? Anyone?

I thought that medications were exempt from the 3-1-1 rule. I thought that water, for medical conditions, was exempt. Is this another example of the screeners doing what was correct? Was it an example of screeners again exceeding their authority and abusing the flying public?

Kip, would either you or one of your minions see fit to answer these questions?
Submitted by Connie on

I just passed through DFW--I had a very pleasant experience, encountering polite TSA agents. Also, a lady I thought left a book in a bathroom stall was asking the TSA agents if her book was somehow left in a bucket. When I caught up to her and told her it was in a bathroom stall, she told them "Never mind", and they politely smiled and one said, "glad you found it." I guess, as long as I have nothing to hide (I don't!!), I'm grateful for the security they provide, and it's only a minor problem to go through my purse to take out the hand cleaner, or bag my dry eye solution. Thanks for your services!

Submitted by Anonymous on

Saturday, March 22nd flight out of DFW early afternoon. Extremely quick thru security with no issues. I was stopped for not having my 1 quart bag out of my carry-on...my fault and the TSA representative was very nice and explained to me the procedure (I knew, just simply forgot.) Will be happy to come back to this airport.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Here's a simple request, if I have already told you I have a pacemaker, don't feel the need to press on my chest until I am utter pain. Your job is to look for contraband, not give me a pacemaker device checkup. I have had brutish TSA employee's press and press like they have discovered something....IT IS PAINFUL FOR ME!

Submitted by Anonymous on

I am an amputee female who wears a prosthetic leg. My leg is not covered, so you can see all the screws, poles, pipes and whatever else is in there.. Yet every time I got through a security check point I get treated as if I am on the FBI most wanted list. I have been asked to remove my LEG. I have been searched (i.e. felt up) so well that it drew an actual crowed. There were 15, yes I said 15, men who all managed to walk up and watch the women do a VERY through job of "frisking" me, well enough that I thought she should have bought me dinner first.. And, of course, as soon as she was done the crowd of men dissipated. I have had TSA swab me for bombs and on my last flight they even swabbed my hands! Oh, and to the guy who was upset about all the "minorities" being the only ones who get special screening.. Well, I'm about as white as they come. I have freckles and no tan.. If you can imagine someone with Irish ancestry, then you know what I look like. I guess I don't understand what it is that I have done to set off red flags.. Or, is this just payback for the excellent parking... Anyway, it just seems a bit excessive, to say the least.

Submitted by Anonymous on

I routinely fly 2-3 times a month that can include 15 different airports in Texas.I agree with a previous comment, each airport is different. For one, TSA personnel should be professional both in mannerism and dress and I must say that they are not. DFW is hit or miss. El Paso (my home city) is not at all. Training must be better. I've gone through lines where the screener was being trained on the spot (El Paso). He missed several items in my bag. Thank goodness I am not a terrorist. Thank You for a wonderful forum. Continue the good work.

Submitted by Anonymous on

I've found the TSA agents at Dallas Fort Worth to be some of the rudest, most arrogant, most hostile, most impatient people I've had the displeasure of having to deal with, second only to those at Philadelphia, but you don't have a blog on that city yet. I don't appreciate being yelled at while I'm trying to show them my medications bag, pull out my DVD player, and take off my shoes all in 2 seconds time. I'm being polite and cooperative while these agents are yelling at me and other passengers in line.

Submitted by Anonymous on

I knew I was going to be singled out for an extra thorough search when I arrived at my gate hot & sweaty. I had left a cold Seattle wearing a turtleneck and cardigan and landed in a very warm Dallas. Of course our flight was late and I had a bazillion gates to cover and no golf cart guy in sight. So I tied the cardigan around my waist, pushed up my sleeves and took off walking as fast as I could without getting arrested. You guessed it - I arrive red in the face, hair damp at the neck and ears with little sweat trickles and I was puffing for air. I saw the look one agent gave to the other and knew what was coming: "Ma'am? We need you to step over here please." Oh yeah - a sweaty middle-aged chubby chick is DEFINITELY a threat to our nation. And don't you love how everyone stops & stares? I hate what happened 9/11 but the government has WAY overreacted. I honestly don't believe the airlines are any more, or less, safe than 10 yrs ago. Take away my perfume, make me toss my water bottle and God forgive me for wearing rubber soled shoes - yep - I feel SO MUCH safer now.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Last November I went to Tel Aviv. You want to see security. On my return through Atlanta I was reminded how poor this system is. It amazes me how we all stand on line especially at D/FW just to pass through and see at least 10 agents just hanging out in the terminal area.

It is evident that Israel and that part of the country is aware of the real threat at all times. But the screeners all apprearing to be in their late 20's to early 30's were efficient as well as professional in the duties.

I once sent a comment to the agency concerning my concerns about the attitude of some of the folks at a screening point. I got a token letter from the head chuck i believe his last name to be slone. Amazing no follow up I did remind him how I though it was amazing how they all "stick together" got some silly reply basically saying I did not know what I was talking about.

I used to work for ASA when Delta had a hub there and I could take an entire page of horror stories I did see at the airport.

Maybe the TSA should watch how these other countries work and realize they can do their job in a highly professional manner

Submitted by Anonymous on

When the security crackdown began after September 11th 2001, travelers were hostile. TSA made an effort to be polite. Recently, efforts to be polite have declined to ridiculous levels. I’m a frequent traveler and I deal with these people on a weekly basis. I honestly believe that TSA personnel would like their jobs so much better if they did not have to deal with travelers. I am certain there is a great deal of protest concerning the rules behind toiletries and the tensions weigh heavy and high on the shoulders of TSA personnel. However, things would go more smoothly if “please” and “thank you” were used on occasion. If they are utilized at all, I have not heard them in my frequent interactions.

In one encounter with a female TSA employee, I had to check my luggage because my liquids did not meet the current guidelines. She asked with some sarcasm if I thought if the rules did not apply to me. Well, it depends, I said, it seems the rules are different from airport to airport. She asked if I wanted help going through my luggage and throwing away any unacceptable bottles, I told her politely that I would check my luggage and I did not care to have her going through my things in a public forum.

The encounter quickly escalated into hot subject for her and when I offered to take my suitcase from her, she yelled at me and told me she had to take it until we exited the area. I backed away from my luggage…. I asked if it was at all within her capability to address me with the respect I deserved as a human being. After all, through the entire encounter, I addressed her as ma’am. A TSA manager came over to intervene after I caught his eye. She tossed her head back and laughed at the suggestion. I guess when you are perceived as cattle, mutual respect and decency do not apply.

Although I would like to attribute this experience to the individual, I have frequently had experiences where I felt as if I were in boot camp. I know the process. I have my ID out at the right time. I keep out my plane ticket for review. However, if I don’t get it to the TSA employee fast enough then I am greeted with a harsh reprimand……. Mooooooooooo.

I mainly attribute this example of indignant behavior as poor training on the part of management. At the very least, poor hiring on the part of TSA should be blamed.
If you are NOT going to train your employees in common etiquette, why not just arm them with cattle prods? You will probably get better results and reduce the size of those lines on Monday morning.

Submitted by Anonymous on

I agree wholehartedly with Robert's comments about TSA employees at DFW. They are rude. They act arrogant. They are gruff and impolite with even the nicest people. I actually had to say something to one of the employees when he addressed an elderly woman in an inappropriate manner. He became impatient and raised his voice to her. This seems to be more the norm now. Not only are your possessions searched and handled, your emotions are in for a beating! Especially if you are new at the game!

Submitted by Anonymous on

I work for the Federal Aviation Administration, yet my badge is insufficient I.D. to show at the security checkpoint of DFW Airport. Not only that, showing it always insures additional screening. Your powers of wasted time (TSA) are stunning to me.
A screener, trained in looking for a "driver's license" is laughable. Not once have I seen a screener verify a driver's license as legitimate. Do they seriously have all 50 states unique licenses memorized? Even bars have books that show them every state license and they use it for out of state patrons if they appear under age...do TSA screeners have such a book? Would they even know a forged Montana license? I seriously doubt it.

-I travel as an FAA inspector more than 50% of the year, I have gotten the shoe removal/laptop/liquid disposal down to a ridiculous science. All in the name of the great illusion that we are somehow "safer" as a flying public. Do you want to know what the scariest part of all this?The FAA wants to continue to contract out technicians who are responsible for maintaining the communications infrastructure, NAVAIDS, Air Traffic Controllers, and everything else that makes flying in this country truly safe. Screeners being made inherently governmental means NOTHING when the rest of what goes on behind the scenes is in danger of being being contracted out. Correct me if I'm wrong, but weren't the screeners on 9-11 contract employees?

-When are we going to get smart about true safety? The folks who bring food to the planes, the ones who clean them, vendors who are INSIDE the security checkpoints don't have their gift shop stock sent through an x-ray machine. PERHAPS some "smart" terrorist would figure that out and get a job delivering bottled water and pretzels. Are you guys working on any of those security risks???

-The TSA is inconsistent, depending at what airport you happen to be departing from. I have watched screeners literally throw luggage with no care or concern for it's contents. I have seen screeners who show only the most angry of emotions. I have seen many more act as if they are "superior" to their fellow citizens. Their sense of entitlement reminds me of the cop that pulls you over simply because he can.

-I fly only out of necessity, because I went to East Berlin once when there was a wall still in place and thank you TSA for reminding me of that experience every time you scowl around like a jerk treating me like a "suspect". I served this Country in the military and continue to serve it as a Federal Inspector and so do thousands of other Americans that you treat so poorly while "just doing your job" Give us a break. You are us, and we are you. Try and remember that when you deal with us because taking off our shoes and the entire process is scary enough for us as a country, and humiliating enough without your complete lack of concern. I have NEVER had a pleasant encounter with TSA. You may add DFW to the top of the list for the worst screeners.

Submitted by Brittni on

I have flown into (from San Diego) and out of the DFW airport 4 times in the past 6 months and it was fairly easy for me. I even had a stroller, car seat, baby, diaper bag, carry on PLUS a purse. The only thing that I disliked was I had NO help trying to break down my stroller to put through the x-ray machine. I had plenty of people behind me probably getting mad, but i had to do all this on my own. On top of it all, I had to dig out all the formula I had with me AND wait for EVERYTHING to go through the x-ray machine before I could begin to gather all my things and get out of the way of all the other passengers coming through. They weren't nice, but they weren't mean either. They just did their job. I did once, go through the new x-ray machine they were testing and it was awesome. I didn't have to do the extra stuff like taking formula out of the bags, etc. If those work effectively, I'm all in favor!!!

Submitted by Anonymous on

Would someone like to explain to me why last month in DFW the TSA personnel felt the need to scream and actually raise his hand to a 73-year-old Japanese grandmother? Did the gentleman think that physically terrifying an old woman would help her understand his drawl? Furthermore, why was I threatened with arrest and denied access to a supervisor when I tried to intervene as an interpreter?

Submitted by Anonymous on

guess what..

people, flying is, and always will be, a PRIVELIGE.

it is no ones right, and it never was, to fly on a commercial airline, nor will it ever be.

if you don't like it, hey guess what. you DO have the right not to come to the airport and consent to the screening process. there are many other ways to get around...go greyhound!! haha. boats, trains, buses, you choose! none of which have long security screening checkpoints to wait at!

it amazes me that people get to the checkpoint, which mind you, have CLEARLY VISIBLE IN MULTIPLE LOCATIONS, posted signage which tells you EXACTLY what to do to make your screening experience go as smoothly as possible, and yet even with everything right there in front of your face, you still come to the metal detector with: your bulky jacket on/sweater tied around your waist, your shoes still on, cellphone in your pocket, lots of jewelry on (for you women out there..), and then after you get thru, we have to do a bag check because you put other items on top of your laptop in the bin, you either didn't put your LGA's in the quart-size plastic bag and kept them in your carry-on, or you may have remembered to get them in the plastic bag, but the you put the plastic bag back inside your carry-on!! and then to top it off, when you walk thru the metal detector, and we ask for your boarding pass....oops! i left it in my bag and now its in the x-ray machine! oh that calls for yet another, boarding pass check! what's the point in having all these signs and pictures put up right in your face when you don't even pay attention to them? there are RULES you must abide by when coming into OUR checkpoint. if you don't like them, you can turn around and find another way to get where you're going. we are here to provide the safety and security that you, the passenger, obviously need and want. you sit here and complain about long wait times and why your bags are always getting searched, when you're the reason the x-ray operator has to stop the belt every other bag to get another officer to come and get the bag and go thru it. it does get quite annoying having to tell people OVER and OVER, "HAVE YOUR BOARDING PASSES OUT LADIES AND GENTLEMEN." mind you, DFW is one of THE largest airports in the nation, and the THIRD BUSIEST IN THE WORLD. of course there are going to be lines, waiting, problems, etc etc. what do you expect? over 50 thousand people a day come to DFW, with about 60 to 70 thousand bags...

Submitted by Anonymous on

"guess what..

people, flying is, and always will be, a PRIVELIGE.

it is no ones right, and it never was, to fly on a commercial airline, nor will it ever be.

if you don't like it, hey guess what. you DO have the right not to come to the airport and consent to the screening process. there are many other ways to get around...go greyhound!! haha. boats, trains, buses, you choose! none of which have long security screening checkpoints to wait at!"

TSA screens at only 5% of the airports in the US.

Add General Aviation to the list. No lines, no ID, checks, no baggage search, security, sure. Many more airports to choose from, thousands, actually.

Submitted by Anonymous on

I just looked through the comments for the other airports that you have blogs for. None of them come close to the number of comments complaining about the rudeness, arrogance, etc of the TSA screeners there compared to the DFW blog. Does this give you an idea that there is something wrong there?

And the posts by one or more of the TSA screeners on this blog surely demonstrate that arrogance and rudeness. Suggesting that we take a bus or a boat is such a nice way to correct the situation there. When we fly, we buy the tickets from the airlines, the TSA screeners provide a service to the passengers and the airlines. We are not there for the sole support of TSA screeners.

Come on, read the blogs, recognize the problems, and correct them. Its obvious.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Do you actually have "Federal Civil Service employees"? They must be old dudes, I haven't anybody at the checkpoints that are old enough to be in the CSRS. I thought they had to be FERS.

Submitted by Anonymous on

"Flying is a privilege."

Wow, a frightening, but not unexpected, level of ignorance from a federal employee.

Travel is a right. The Government can only interfere to the point that it can PROVE it must. Did you sleep through Civics?

To everyone reading this blog: You have the right to travel. You have the right to speak your mind. You have the right to pray to any God you want. Your government is accountable to you.

Yes, people died to secure these rights for us. The fact that TSA appears to have forgotten the basic principles of Liberty irritates to no end.

Or, to put it in White House vernacular, "The TSA hates us for our freedoms."

Submitted by Anonymous on

I am a child of 13 and flew out of the airport March 14 and in March 21. The way it worked at 6:30 in he morning is unsatisfactory to me because what makes you think that you can be rude to a child I was so mad at TSA during security of course I passed through fine but thier attitudes need to change and be a little happier in the mornings.

Submitted by Anonymous on

When I travel with my daughter & grandbaby, we take the baby's stroller with us. The stroller is very big because a carseat attaches to it. It is too wide to fit through the scanner. After having gone through DFW airport many times, I know that the buggy will not fit. On our recent trip, I explained to the TSA employee that it will not fit. She told me, "Fold it, pick it up and put on the conveyor belt." I tried explaining again. She got annoyed, yelled at me, "It will fit. Just put it up there" I folded up the stroller and said, "Alright. Show me how it will fit." Of course she kept ramming it at different angles to try and get the buggy to fit. Guess what? It did not fit! She finally said that it would need to be inspected and pushed it around. She never apologized for yelling or scratching the buggy up.

Did I get a badge number or report her? No. We had a baby crying at the top of her lungs, two purses that had long cleared the screening and sitting unattended, and a flight that we needed to catch, due to the delay in watching a TSA employee attempt to cram a big object into a too-small opening and waiting for somebody to inspect the buggy since we had the audacity to purchase a stoller that did not fit the DFW TSA scanner.

Submitted by Darla on

We were flying out of DFW to Orlando on American around 8 am on December 16, 2006. I hadn't flown since September 1998, but researched online so I would know what to expect. We placed our things in the plastic bins, and went through. While I was collecting my things (I went through first), I saw my 7 year old daughter's shoes come down without the bin. I saw the screener throw something away, but didn't think anything about it until I asked my daughter if she got her bag of liquids back. She said no. I quickly went back to the checkpoint, and asked a different screener about it. He asked the woman that had originally screened us, and she told him she had thrown it into the wastebasket. Luckily, we found it and I went back to the gate.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Thousands of people walk across the unsanitary floors going through the scanners. No customer should have to remove socks, our sandals unless there is a clean area to do so.


If I wear flip -flop sandals, light weight footie’s, our surgical disposable shoe covers, I am ask to remove them and walk barefoot to the next area. Nasty! Nasty! Nasty!

Submitted by Anonymous on

I have no problem with my baggage being checked. What I detest is that the TSA employee cannot put the items in the luggage back as they found them. I many times have had to re-lauder my shirts and pants because some TSA employee, after checking my luggage, just threw everything back into the luggage, with no consideration. Trying to file a claim for laudry expense is worse than telling the IRS you don't want to pay taxes anymore.

Submitted by Anonymous on

If you do not want to walk on the floor barefoot bring socks with you. Its not like it is unexpected that you will be asked to remove your shoes when going through security so bring socks. The worst kind of complainer is a person who just expects someone else to provide the solution for them instead of trying to come up with solutions themselves. Its not rocket science besides dfw provides hospital booties for their passengers they are located conviently underneath the very large sign that announces their whereabouts complete with a very large ARROW.

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