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Got Feedback: Reagan National Airport (Commenting Disabled)

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Thursday, January 31, 2008
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Due to the new Got Feedback? program, we have disabled commenting on this page. This page was part of a pilot program that has evolved and this page is no longer needed. You are still welcome to leave general feedback on our blog, or you can visit our Got Feedback? page and leave specific feedback with a Customer Service Manager from any one of our 450+ airports.

Thanks,

EoS Blog Team

Comments

Submitted by Aw on

I flew out of national on 3/16 to Toronto on Air Canada and did not have any difficulties.

Submitted by BMac on

I've done a few domestic flights to/from RRNA and I've been generally pleased by the speed and thoroughness of security there. They seem generally a bit a more gentle with luggage, too.

Submitted by Anonymous on

After a recent trip I discovered that TSA had "inspected" my luggage. That in itself is not a problem. The problem was that the inspector left the contents a mess...ditty bags left open allowing contents to spill throughbout the interior...small items scattering about inside. Inspection is one thing...with authority to safeguard comes responsibility to "safeguard"! Clean up the act people!

Submitted by MM on

This is a recommendation not only for Reagan National which I fly out of, but also most other aiports.

I am concerned that there is not enough care or protection for laptops as they exit the screening machines. Mine almost fell off, or was pushed off the conveyor by succeeding carry-ons, after passing through the machine. Once a laptop hits the floor, it's functioning and all the valuable data within might be permanently destroyed. If there were a way to channel the post-screening gear better to ensure that it doesn't fall off the conveyor, it would make those of us who need to carry a laptop (or two) a whole lot less nervous (and therefore suspicious) as we pass through what is otherwise a good screening procedure.

Submitted by Mike on

I have traveled through DCA three times in 2008. Two of the three times, the officer operating the x-ray unit was running the bags through without stopping for an extended period of time. Their hands weren't even on the control panel. To quantify, I watch about two dozen items (bags, shoes, laptops) go through without stopping. I don't see this happen at the other airports I typically travel though, which is why it stood out.

Submitted by Mike on

Just to give kudos...the DCA folks were generally professional. In the three times I traveled through DCA in 2008, I never waited in a line more than a few minutes. The most recent trip (this week) I encountered a very happy and friendly officer collecting empty bins.

Submitted by Anonymous on

I applaud this effort to reach out to the flying public. My question is regarding shoes. I don't have much issue taking them off ... I do take issue with not having a consistent policy about how they to through the x-ray machine. Some airports make me put them on the belt. Some make me put them in a separate container from my other stuff. Some let me pile it in with my jacket and purse and such. There are times when I have t have three separate bins - one for laptop, one for general stuff, and one for shoes. This seems like overkill. However, whatever the rules are I just wish they were consistent from airport to airport. I am well travelled and hate it when I'm fumbling at the security line because the rules have been switched up!

Lisa --

Submitted by Anonymous on

The security lines need to open up earlier in the morning. If you have a 6:00-6:30AM flight it is a real rush to make the plane once security opens (there is often a LONG line).

Submitted by Jason on

it seems as if CO is the only one still enforcing the 30 minute rule that requires passengers to stay seated.
I flew on CO 1058 IAH-DCA on 3/14
and again on CO 442 DCA-IAH 3/23.
Both flights locked the lavatory's and told all passengers to remain seated for 30 minutes after take off.

Calling TSA (spoke to Mike at the contact center) and it just started a conversation about how they have nothing to do with anything after the aircraft takes off and resulted in nothing.

Can you clarify the rules on www.tsa.gov for the 30 minute rule from DCA?

Submitted by Anonymous on

I recently flew out of DCA and all went well. The line flow at the US concourse looks like chaos but it moves well.

One suggestion overall -- could you make the grey bins 2" wider so I can put my laptop in sideways? That way my shoes can or baggie can fit next to it.

Submitted by Anonymous on

I've had issues in other airports, but found DCA a pleasure to walk through. Security was friendly, intelligent, and easy to communicate with -- I was in and out in no time. More airports should take cues from DCA (especially Hancock International -- SYR).

Submitted by Anonymous on

General comment on DCA. TSA are pleasant and professional. There is a breakdown, however, when it comes to giving crew members priority in the screening lines. This is handled chaotically. Crew should not be allowed to jump the same line. TSA should "allocate" crew to the open lines pro-rata. So, for example, if there are four lines and twelve crew members show up within 15 minutes, they should go three to each line, line by line and crew member by crew member. Instead, the way it currently "works" 12 crew members are all put in the same line (the one closest to the ID checking agent). This means that the pax in that line get screwed. Please think about it.

Submitted by Anonymous on

It disgusts me to see these comments regarding security and the supposedly uneducated screeners. There is quite a bit of educated personnel within our ranks from the lowest end (which is a screener) to upper management, but to assume we are all uneducated is quite ignorant. The majority of us have degrees in various subjects or we come highly decorated from various branches of the Armed Forces (you know those people who fight for our freedom), we chose this agency to assist any way we can in ensuring the American public a safe passage. We are targeted on a daily basis from passengers and the media; put yourself in our shoes just for a moment and imagine screening up to 15,000 people and that is just on your shift (which is 8 hours)daily. Can you fathom that? There is 15,000 people coming through your area and you have to explain everything to divest, declare,conduct bag checks, hand wands, full body pat-downs and etc, for eight hours. Are you gong to make everyone happy? The answer is no, because most people come in the airports already upset about the process either something happened to them (once) or they heard various things from co-workers or friends and they are determined not to be happy about any part of the process. We have taken over document checking and identification which we provide 100% better than private companies; we also are conducting Screening Passengers by Observation Techniques, which if you read the TSA website have resulted in the capturing of known felons, persons that are trying to deceive the U.S govt with fraudulent documents and etc. In conclusion, we(screeners) are all human to, we put on our shoes one at a time just the same as you(passengers)if we could all treat each other with openness and respect we would not have these problems we have to day. Have a great day or evening.

CD (IAH)

Submitted by Anonymous on

What a speedy experience! I went through Terminal C pier on Friday evening Easter weekend with no line. I was prepared for holiday travel delays, but walked up and through. Plenty of staff--maybe supplemented by trainees? Only observation I would make is that I've seen the press on self-select Diamond lanes and the Clear Card, so as I was approaching the line, I asked a security officer if there was a black diamond lane here yet. She seemed not to understand my question and I clarified that I wasn't asking about the clear card, but the "expert" lane. She turned to another officer behind her to forward my question. He really did not have an answer either, but simply said that if I wanted a fast lane, just use the one ahead because it had no line. It seemed as if I, as a passenger, knew more about new efforts to expedite passenger screening than the officers did.

Submitted by Ian on

I go through DCA a fair bit and it's usually been okay, though I never seem to be there at peak times.

The screeners at DCA are usually on the better side of courtesy compared to much of the country. It's a vastly different experience from the torment that is Dulles (international flights? less frequent travellers?).

Submitted by Anonymous on

Traveling thru any airport, on any airline is a bit, well, scary. The very fact that our government "protects" us by stripping us of our self defense tools we may be well trained with is a bit ironic at the least, downright incidious and the worst. Even in a terminal, let alone an airplate, "when seconds count, the police may be ONLY minutes away".

Submitted by Anonymous on

I am a veteran world traveler..I have been in many airports in the USA and throughout the world. I applaud the TSA, It is not an easy job, never will be. My woer aiport is Dulles in Wash DC. People who are coming back from overseas (already tired) have to process through a "GESTAPO" like environment. There are never words like" Ladies and Gentlemen make sure all your belongings are place in the the trays provided etc etc" Instead is is a barrage of yelling, very high pitched at times to gert the message across. WHat should be done is to get some of the screeners away from the x-rays machines cand closer to US Customs giving out instructions in a more courteous manner.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Reagan national is a good airport to travel through. My issue is that I get a full body frisk everytime I fly anywhere because I have a knee replacement. It is easy to identify the area setting off the alarm, and I'm willing to show the scar. why does the rest of my body need to frisked when wanding sets off no other alarms?
Thank you,
A Grey-haired old lady

Submitted by Anonymous on

I'm tired of the "it's not our fault your late," line from TSA staff. Yes it is. If people had been doing their jobs on 9/11, we wouldn't be in this overreactive state today.

Speed it up. It takes too long to get through screening. It would be nice if we could ban carry-on luggage, but that's tough to do, with the airlines doing such a crappy job of losing luggage and taking too long to unload it.

What if we all just travelled naked? It would be more fun. Would that speed things up, or would TSA start turning on to more cavity searches?

Thanks for asking, but I'm driving on my next trip. Flight times should include the extra hour or more to meet check-in and security requirements.

Submitted by Anonymous on

I know that TSA wasn't responsible for it, but the plastic bags that the Washington Metropolitan Authority has at the entrance to every line are great. TSA should consider that for every airport, not just the cheap ziploc box floating around, often empty.

Submitted by Anonymous on

I flew into Reagan and had no problems whatsoever. Everything was at ease, even down to getting my luggage fairly quickly instead of waiting too long. Will definitely fly into there more often than IAD.

Submitted by Anonymous on

I live in the D.C. suburbs and prefer to use Reagan National (DCA).
My only complaint(s) are TSA employees are often very rude and at times there is no consistency to their methods.

I understand they are under a great deal of stress but feel they, and the traveling public, would both benefit if they took communications training and showed empathy for travellers.

Other than that I have no complaints as to the time it takes, etc. I feel the time through security lines in justified by our need for safety.

Submitted by Anonymous on

I am concerned that when I have to take off my shoes, people will see that I have holes in my socks.

Also, I couldn't help but notice that the ladies in this airport look very cute and clean, but they are too stuck up to give the time of day for a guy like me who has to work for a living. All they want are rich politicians.

Submitted by Anonymous on

The metal detectors at DCA seem to be set differently than at other airports I fly through. For instance, my belt buckle will set off the metal detectors at DCA, but will not at MSY (New Orleans). It makes for a very confusing time on deciding what will/will not set off the metal detectors at various airports.

Submitted by Anonymous on

I'm glad that we have you but, why do you pre-select our military for extra search? I know you can pre-select people that you should search, but our military? The ones that protect our country? That's just silly. I don't care if you hurt ethnic groups feelings by searching them, they are more likely to cause problems then our military personal!

Submitted by Anonymous on

My experience at DCA has been generally very positive, except that last time I flew out of DCA, I had forgotten that I always carry a 4 oz. jar of hand cream in my purse (it's a big handbag). I didn't even know it was in there until I was leaving my destination city in Tampa where it was confiscated by a TSA official there at the checkpoint. The DCA TSA folks missed it entirely.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Could TSA people look at my face when they are checking ID's against tickets? MOST of the time they never make eye contact so I'm not sure how they are confirming that I am the person on the ID.

Submitted by Mulan on

I have flown to/from Reagan many times with no issues. Unfortunately, my last flight (Wed, 23 Apr, flight 628) from San Diego to Reagan, though I used a TSA approved lock (TSA2), my lock was removed and never returned. This was a problem when I needed to leave my luggage with the hotel concierge for an entire day the next day... Is there a way I can get TSA to send me a new lock or reimburse me for the lock not returned? Thanks ahead of time for any answers.

Submitted by Yiling on

On my way home from Reagan National today, I noticed a whole sitting area with a great view of takeoffs, lined with rocking chairs. It reminded me I'd seen some in Dulles airport too, and I want to say that whoever thought of having rocking chairs in either airport is great. What could be more relaxing than sitting in a rocking chair when you've got some time to kill before boarding? I look forward to making use of one of those chairs one day soon.

Also: this blog was a great idea.

Submitted by Anonymous on

RESPONSE TO

"Anonymous said...
What a speedy experience! I went through Terminal C pier on Friday evening Easter weekend with no line. I was prepared for holiday travel delays, but walked up and through. Plenty of staff--maybe supplemented by trainees? Only observation I would make is that I've seen the press on self-select Diamond lanes and the Clear Card, so as I was approaching the line, I asked a security officer if there was a black diamond lane here yet. She seemed not to understand my question and I clarified that I wasn't asking about the clear card, but the "expert" lane. She turned to another officer behind her to forward my question. He really did not have an answer either, but simply said that if I wanted a fast lane, just use the one ahead because it had no line. It seemed as if I, as a passenger, knew more about new efforts to expedite passenger screening than the officers did."


well there are tons of different airports around the country its virtually impossible to keep up with every airport's rules and regulations. we can only cater to the one we work at.

Submitted by Anonymous on

RESPONSE TO

" Anonymous said...
I am a veteran world traveler..I have been in many airports in the USA and throughout the world. I applaud the TSA, It is not an easy job, never will be. My woer aiport is Dulles in Wash DC. People who are coming back from overseas (already tired) have to process through a "GESTAPO" like environment. There are never words like" Ladies and Gentlemen make sure all your belongings are place in the the trays provided etc etc" Instead is is a barrage of yelling, very high pitched at times to gert the message across. WHat should be done is to get some of the screeners away from the x-rays machines cand closer to US Customs giving out instructions in a more courteous manner.
"

WELL..we have tried that before but... i find that if you politely tell a passenger to keep their boarding pass in their hands that the next passenger slaps him/herself on the forehead because they realize they just did the same thing which is forget it in their bag. so we usually make a loud announcement. with commotion going out you really have no choice but to make that loud announcement

Submitted by Anonymous on

RESPONSE TO

"Anonymous said...
I'm tired of the "it's not our fault your late," line from TSA staff. Yes it is. If people had been doing their jobs on 9/11, we wouldn't be in this overreactive state today.

Speed it up. It takes too long to get through screening. It would be nice if we could ban carry-on luggage, but that's tough to do, with the airlines doing such a crappy job of losing luggage and taking too long to unload it.

What if we all just travelled naked? It would be more fun. Would that speed things up, or would TSA start turning on to more cavity searches?

Thanks for asking, but I'm driving on my next trip. Flight times should include the extra hour or more to meet check-in and security requirements.
"

so... its TSA's fault that you arrived rather late to the airport ?? tsa didnt set your alarm clock to wake up earlier or prep you at your home to arrive earlier ? are you serious. thats one of the worst things i have ever heard in my life. to seriously put a blame like that on someone else. thats just lazy.

Submitted by Anonymous on

RESPONSE TO

" Anonymous said...
I am concerned that when I have to take off my shoes, people will see that I have holes in my socks.

Also, I couldn't help but notice that the ladies in this airport look very cute and clean, but they are too stuck up to give the time of day for a guy like me who has to work for a living. All they want are rich politicians.
"

is that a real reason to keep your shoes on ???

Submitted by Anonymous on

RE4SPONSE TO

"Anonymous said...
I'm glad that we have you but, why do you pre-select our military for extra search? I know you can pre-select people that you should search, but our military? The ones that protect our country? That's just silly. I don't care if you hurt ethnic groups feelings by searching them, they are more likely to cause problems then our military personal!
"

we dont pre select you.. whomever you are flying with does. we just carry on the procedure. you would have to run that with us airways and american airlines... just to name a few. the boarding passes are printed out on their computers in which we have no connection

Submitted by Anonymous on

RESPONSE TO

" Anonymous said...
Could TSA people look at my face when they are checking ID's against tickets? MOST of the time they never make eye contact so I'm not sure how they are confirming that I am the person on the ID.
"

i can vouche for myself that when i check tickets i ALWAYS make eye contact when reaching for the boarding pass/ID. so when i look down to verify i already have your "face" in mind for the ticket and if not i occasionally take a 2nd look.

Submitted by Lynn on

In response to:

Yiling said...
On my way home from Reagan National today, I noticed a whole sitting area with a great view of takeoffs, lined with rocking chairs. It reminded me I'd seen some in Dulles airport too, and I want to say that whoever thought of having rocking chairs in either airport is great. What could be more relaxing than sitting in a rocking chair when you've got some time to kill before boarding? I look forward to making use of one of those chairs one day soon.

Also: this blog was a great idea.


Thanks for the kind words on the blog - glad you like it. Hope you keep coming back with feedback. The rocking chairs are a great idea!

Lynn
EoS Blog Team

Submitted by Bob on
Anonymous said... I applaud this effort to reach out to the flying public. My question is regarding shoes. I don't have much issue taking them off ... I do take issue with not having a consistent policy about how they to through the x-ray machine. Some airports make me put them on the belt. Some make me put them in a separate container from my other stuff. Some let me pile it in with my jacket and purse and such. There are times when I have t have three separate bins - one for laptop, one for general stuff, and one for shoes. This seems like overkill. However, whatever the rules are I just wish they were consistent from airport to airport. I am well travelled and hate it when I'm fumbling at the security line because the rules have been switched up! Lisa --March 23, 2008 8:33 AM

Lisa,

Shoes are supposed to be placed either on the belt or in a bin with the sole facing down.

If you can list the different airports and what they're doing, I can look a little deeper into the matter for you.

Thanks,

Bob

TSA EoS Blog Team
Submitted by Aten on

With reference to recent regulations restricting the size and location of Lithium Batteries allowed:
-How are passengers to know what type of battery they are transporting? Is there a standard that requires that batteries be clearly marked with the chemistry inside them?
-How will TSA employees scanning check in and carry on luggage be able to differentiate between Lithium Ion , Lithium Polymer, NiMH and Nickle Cadmium rechargeable batteries?
-Is signage currently in place prior to security checkpoints that clearly explains the restrictions to passengers?
-Will check-in luggage be screened after check in?
-Do the restrictions include Lithium Polymer batteries or are they limited to Lithium Ion and Lithium Metal chemistry batteries?
-Most professional that use large Lithium Ion batteries, such as the one in my power drill or my colleague’s professional video camera, are not likely to know of the new restrictions. Will their batteries be confiscated if discovered at Airport security checkpoints?
-What in fact is the enforcement provision of this new rule?
-If there are going to be rules on the battery types and sizes that are deemed safe for airline travel from the US, how will batteries arriving into the USA from foreign countries be handled? Are these new rules going to be enforced for all US bound airlines passengers too? In other words- are these rules going to require special checkpoint provisions for foreign airports that now screen US bound shoes for example?
Thanks

Submitted by Anonymous on

I didn't see the HSPD-12 ID listed as approved form of identification. Is it and can it be used in trusted traveler lines?
Thanks

Submitted by Anonymous on

Inconsistencies.

How come when I travel through IND, once the TSA person has looked at my ID and ticket, I am done with it, but when I go thru DCA, they need to see my ID/ticket again.

Why?? Do they not trust the person that looked at it not 5 friggin minutes ago!

If there is a legitimate reason, ok, but how about some consistency!

Submitted by Anonymous on

The reason that some airports check the boarding pass twice is because they're helping to reduce human error by having another screener look at the boarding pass. We do make mistakes and pulling a whole planeload of passengers to rescreen them all due to one of these mistakes is way beyond inconvenient. People do walk around the ticket checker on occasion as well.

Submitted by Anonymous on

We travelled thru Reagan DC earlier this month and had one of our bags pulled over for search. The crew were all friendly and courteous, the searcher was respectful whilst still being thorough and it was an Ok experience.
Blake

Submitted by Anonymous on

Anonymous said...
Inconsistencies.

How come when I travel through IND, once the TSA person has looked at my ID and ticket, I am done with it, but when I go thru DCA, they need to see my ID/ticket again.

Why?? Do they not trust the person that looked at it not 5 friggin minutes ago!

If there is a legitimate reason, ok, but how about some consistency!

ITS NOT AN INCONSISTENCY, SOME AIRPORTS HAVE DESIGNATED LANES ESPECIALLY FOR PASSENGERS FOR ADDITIONAL SCREENING. DCA HOWEVER DOES NOT. ITS ALL ABOUT MAN POWER.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Dear Nationality That Gets Special TSA Treatment:

To help ease the waste of time conducted by the TSA on your person and your belongings, just remember that those same people are making a little above minimum wage and that you are not. Some of us have been here for only a few years and are earning more money in one year than they will in their entire lives. So next time you get selected for that 'random' security check just smile while thinking this person lives paycheck to paycheck :)

Submitted by Anonymous on

minimum wage ? really ?

if "just above minimum wage" = 13.00/hour how come the economy isnt booming ? how come there are sooo many foreclosures if the minimum wage is 13.00 instead of 7.00 it was a couple years ago ?

Submitted by Anonymous on

"Some of us have been here for only a few years and are earning more money in one year than they will in their entire lives. So next time you get selected for that 'random' security check just smile while thinking this person lives paycheck to paycheck."

While I realize that the piece rate for vegetable pickers may indeed work out to be slightly greater than that of a TSA employee's salary (travesty, that), especially when taxation is taken into consideration, I do believe that this may be something of an overstatement.

Submitted by Stephen on

I fly into DCA every other week and it's one of the best airports in the U.S. TSA lines are always short and quick.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Today while going through security at National Airport, I was having my license checked. A lady cut through the line and came up with 4 people. She told the TSA agent that she has the people, and he told her that he will check thier ID's after he checked mine. She proceeds to rush them through and flashes her back. The TSA agent was clearly annoyed, and proceeds to tell me "Whatever, if something happens its not my fault." I am sure the people flying through were important, but doesn't every need to have their ID's checked now? And if the TSA agent feels that his authority has been comprimised, then why is there no escalalation. This was clearly not a FLYCLEAR escort. This was an imporant person being rush to a flight. I don't understand why that would matter when it comes to security. In case you want to look at the time, I was at the security gate around 3:40. Im am ot complaining. As I hear the TSA agent make a statement, there clearly was something not right.

Submitted by Anonymous on

The airport itself was fine, but the layout really was poor. I landed from New York in one terminal and due to the long waits to take off from New York, I was running late for my connecting flight which was in another terminal. I had to leave a "secured" area and then get in line for another security check. Due to the rush, I was now finding myself being forced to quickly get things ready for the unexpected security screen, and horrors of horrors, I had a bottle of water. Purchased at the New York airport after security. Not too big of a deal, the water was thrown away, a shame with how much it costs now.

I would say my complaint was the attitude of the checker. Maybe she was having a bad day, but the negative attitude should have been checked before she started working. It is stressful for the paying passengers, having to deal with the "budget-saving" adjustments and the difficult connections, without having to deal with security personnel with attitude issues.

Her attitude was enough that I regretted not getting one of the comment cards, but they were only available at the entrance to security and not the exit. I would suggest that the cards be relocated so that they are available after the customers have experienced either a positive or negative experience.

It would also be nice if the airlines would let you know that you have to exit a secure area to get to your connections. Reagan Airport is the only airport I have experienced that so far, so perhaps I have just been fortunate.

I do know that I was angry enough that I will avoid using that airport for transfers in the future.

Submitted by Denise on

First, my recent trip was my first one through Reagan National and was overall a positive experience. The lines moved quickly and TSA employees were friendly. However, when I got back, I found a purse belonging to someone else in my suitcase. It was empty so I have no idea who it belonged to. Anyone missing a Dooney & Bourke bag who flew out of Reagan the morning of July 17 at US Airways terminal? Second, several small items (shampoo, conditioner, lotion, body wash and mouth wash) that were in the bottom of my cosmetic bag in my checked luggage when I took it to the airport were not in it when I arrived home. Third, my expansion zipper was opened, although it was not needed, and my suitcase zipper was jammed in a position I never leave it. Sad that my taxpayer dollars pay for this "extra service." And no note that my luggage had been gone through as I usually have received in the past.

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