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Gripes & Grins, Part 2 (Commenting Disabled)

Comments

Submitted by Anonymous on

Anonymous said...
"Please fill the trunk of your car with food, drinks, and condiments and drive to your destination!
Don't forget your GAS card!"

Why do you automatically assume that this was a TSO?

Walks like a duck, quacks like a duck....

Submitted by Anonymous on

"Anonymous said...

I have no idea who some of these TSO's are, responding to some of these "Anonymous"idiots who post here."

Let me see, you are posting anonymously, and complaining about anonymous idiots. Hmmmm...

Submitted by Anonymous on

What items are clearly allowed as carry-on food?
wrapped Candy/nutrition/fruit bars?
homemade sandwiches?
bagged nuts/fruit/trailmix?
chips or crackers?
boxed items- what sizes are permitted?

I think that it is fair to say that the guidelines are very unclear about these items and permitted quantities.

Submitted by Anonymous on

hi sandra

you commented on child screening and i though it would be nice to explain this process a bit.

i am sure u are aware of the fact that profiling is ineffective since a terrorist can look like anyone and be from anywhere.
If you’ve read any newspapers there are countless atrocities reported oversees where women and children are harnessed in killings.

Given these bleak truths the TSA is trained to screen everyone acordingly

TSO's are not looking to screen your 9 moth old or your 5year old... they are merely insuring that there is nothing prohibited being smuggled in via covert means.

Having your child scream at the top of his/her lungs while being patted down... is a bit cruel and excessive and will lead to a bit more of a delay as you explain this disruption to a supervisor.

The child will not be screened without an accompanying adult present, so of course you will be briefed on what will occur and you will be watching.

if anything you can always complain to the STSO if you feel something was done wrong during your screening.

It is never the TSA's intension to cause you anguish.
Obviously screening is not something we do for fun but rather to clear any alarms or solve any selectee designations. It is a matter of security and we will not take the risk of assuming.

I'm sorry this bothers you but it’s always important to maintain "better safe then sorry"

sincerely
TSO :)

Submitted by Anonymous on

My gripe is at Kansas City International Airport (MCI) the TSA will not allow a passenger to take drinks into the secure area. Although everytime I fly out, early especially the flight crew are allowed their Starbucks in as well as bottle water. Why as there is no decent place inside the secure area to purchase something are the flight crew allowed? Are they special?

The rule should be one rule if it is dangerous then it is dangerous for all. If the captain needs his Starbucks in the morning let him get up early and get it just like the rest of us. Stand in line like us and no you do not have special "Cut in Line priviledge!"

As a very frequent flyer this practice is not allowed in larger airports.

Submitted by Anonymous on

"I am extremely cordial with passengers and go out of my way to greet the passenger, smile at the passenger, give helpful hints to the passenger, and wish them a great day and a happy flight, no matter what duty station I'm on.
If you have a situation with a TSO, talk to the STSO and a Complaint form will be filled out. It will be submitted for review.
This week I received three written compliments which made me very appreciable. Have you ever tried either one?"

Both good advice and a great attitude. I hope that you continue to post, and that you mentor other TSO's in your method of dealing with the traveling public.

Thank You.

Submitted by Anonymous on

To Phil,

Please ensure that if you post a link to letter that you want everyone to read, you read the letter yourself. It is true that it is not required to show ID, however if you do not show ID you will be subject to secondary(additional) screening. That letter that you refer to was also published 2 months before TSA began checking ID's and boarding passes in place of the contracted company doing so.

Submitted by Anonymous on

I may be wrong but it seems to me that there is alot of anti-TSA "spam" here.

I'm still waiting for the "anonymous" poster to "school TSO's" about the exceptions to the 311 rule. What are they?

I applaud the Navy Veteran with the two replaced knees for his service! However if you walk through the MAG and it alarms you will be asked to exit and reentered. If you set the alarms off again you will be "wanded"! Thats everyone.

The poster who has a reason for his CPAP setting off alarms when it is tested....clean it! I've seen filters on CPAP machines co crusted, it is a wonder air gets through. Secondly, TSO's are not trained to accept your excuse why, they have to test to be sure.

Ah yes, the DVD player. The rule is that it comes out of the case.

Sandra is the best though. Appalled at children being patted down!! I guess we are the only country in the world that does it? BTW, the correct name is a "Process"! The reason that the child is being processed 99% of the time is because the Airline you purchased your tickets from....called for it!!

So if you have a gripe against TSO's, at least know what you are talking about.

Submitted by Anonymous on

TSA Carry-on Regulations Update — August 4, 2007


As of August 4, 2007, the TSA is requiring travelers to remove full-size game consoles (examples include Playstation, X-box, and Nintendo), CD and DVD players from their carry-on bags for separate X-ray screening at security checkpoints. They will be handled the same way laptops and larger video cameras (that use cassettes) have been for some time. The TSA states that “Small electronic items, such as cell phones, MP3 players, iPods and portable video game systems do not have to be removed from their carrying cases.” Bear in mind, however, that since this is a new regulation, there may be some initial confusion or misinterpretation on the part of the TSA inspectors. Be prepared to remove any and all electronics from your carry-on bag, and allow a little extra time for screening.

Also new as of August 4th, the TSA has relaxed the ban on lighters in carry-on luggage: “In an effort to concentrate resources on detecting explosive threats, TSA will no longer ban common lighters in carry-on luggage as of August 4, 2007. Torch lighters remain banned in carry-ons.

Lifting the lighter ban is consistent with TSA's risk-based approach to aviation security. First and foremost, lighters no longer pose a significant threat. Freeing security officers up from fishing for 22,000 lighters every day (the current number surrendered daily across the country) enables them to focus more on finding explosives, using behavior recognition, conducting random screening procedures and other measures that increase complexity in the system, deterring terrorists. The U.S. is the only country in the world to ban lighters – all other nations, including Israel and the U.K., do not.”

In addition, the TSA has modified the regulations on carrying breast milk through security checkpoints: “Mothers flying with, and now without, their child will be permitted to bring breast milk in quantities greater than three ounces as long as it is declared for inspection at the security checkpoint.

Breast milk is in the same category as liquid medications. Now, a mother flying without her child will be able to bring breast milk through the checkpoint, provided it is declared prior to screening.”

Travelers will not be asked to taste the milk to prove it is not a liquid explosive.

Submitted by Will Kamm on

"BOY, YOU ARE MISSING THE POINT COMPLETELY - DID IT EVER ACCUR TO YOU DO NOT NEED A SECRET CLEARANCE FOR YOUR JOBS SSI INFORMATION THAT USE MUST USE TO PERFORM YOUR JOB??

IF YOU ACTUALLY WERE AWARE OF THIS, YOU WOULD NOT HAVE COMMENTED ON THAT."

Don't be silly. If information is classified, you need a clearance - even if it's only a garden-variety FOUO (For Official Use Only) clearance, which requires no background check.

If SSI material is unclassified in your organization, I would call it "SBU" (Sensitive But Unclassified). We call this "open source". It is restricted, but unclassified, which means that it technically can be released to those who have no clearance. The exclusion categories for this include "national security". Good luck fitting that category to include the specific criteria for taking your shoes off in an airport security line.

The funny thing about what you said is, not only do you need the SSI information you alluded to in order to perform your job; but travelers need that information to know how to get through your checkpoints. It would be like us setting up a checkpoint in Iraq, not posting any procedures, and then shooting people for violating the procedures that we didn't post.

Oh, and would you mind writing using lower-case? All-caps is considered rude on the Internet.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Now that a TSA-certified flight deck officer's gun has accidentally discharged during a US Airways commercial flight, who is going to protect us from those who are protecting us?

Can one request "handgun-free" flights from the airlines?

Submitted by Anonymous on

To the lady, Sandra, with the comment on the patting down of infants. Unfortunately you are not seeing all sides to the enforcement of security at the airports.

In your eyes it may seem that the patting down of children is absurd but the TSA is unable to make assunmptions about any individual coming through security and all persons who alarm or children being carried by sn adult who alarmed must get screened.

If you did research and thought about the logic behind TSA screening infants you would find that there have been multiple incidents where children and infants have been used as suicide bombers and terrorists.

Children are vulnerable and for a suicide bomber they may be a prime choice to try and get past the security process.

Unfortunately as absurd as it may seem, it is what our world has come to and it has to be done or the U.S. will be compromised again.

Submitted by Anonymous on

While it's unfortunate that we need security checkpoints, I feel that TSA employees have a thankless job. Perhaps if passengers knew what they were doing before getting in the security line TSA personnel would treat people better.

When we go through the line we do what we're supposed to do, TSA treats us fine, and we say "Thank You" to each that we have contact with.

As with everything in life, acting properly and politely goes a long way.

So, we say TSA is doing an adequate job given what they're dealing with. We prefer screening rather than dangerous objects going onto a plane we're riding in. THANK YOU TSA.

Submitted by Anonymous on
I'm still waiting for the "anonymous" poster to "school TSO's" about the exceptions to the 311 rule. What are they?

Medications?
Food/drink for diabetics?
OTC medications?

We, the traveling public are tired of dealing with made up on the spot rules and regulations. Many of us fly on a weekly basis and know when we're being fed a shovel of used bull food.

Oh, and please someone define the term 'reasonable amounts."
Submitted by Winstonsmith on

Hello Anonymous Person:

To the following:

In your eyes it may seem that the patting down of children is absurd but the TSA is unable to make assunmptions about any individual coming through security and all persons who alarm or children being carried by sn adult who alarmed must get screened.

If you did research and thought about the logic behind TSA screening infants you would find that there have been multiple incidents where children and infants have been used as suicide bombers and terrorists.

It is theoretically possible to wire a baby as a bomb, true. Can you cite a single incidence where this has been tried (since you claim multiple incidences, just one will do)? No, strollers don't count. We're talking baby here. Similarly for children -- there have been documented cases where people have blown up children as part of a suicide bombing (i.e. leaving them in a rigged car perhaps to make the car look less suspicious to passers by -- an incident that was reported recently coming out of Iraq comes to mind for that) but it was the car, not the kids who were rigged to blow. The children were no less the victims of this than anyone else who may have been unfortunate enough to be in the immediate vicinity of the exploding car.

All kinds of crazy things are theoretically possible. It is impossible to guard against every micro threat that comes along. The kid does not understand why a strange adult is patting him or her down and why Mommy and Daddy can do nothing but watch it happen. All the kid understands is that he's scared. So are the parents. So is everyone else who watches this -- is it going to be my turn next?

Leave the kids alone. They have enough to worry about with the mess the people in power are leaving to them to clean up without the TSA's help.

Submitted by Anonymous on
I applaud the Navy Veteran with the two replaced knees for his service! However if you walk through the MAG and it alarms you will be asked to exit and reentered. If you set the alarms off again you will be "wanded"! Thats everyone.

Wanded is one thing. Being frisked like a criminal suspect is something else. 99.99% of the people who fly aren't in any way criminals. TSA treats people (i.e. elderly and disabled) as if those folks were hardened terrorists/criminals on the level of Karlos the Jackal.
Submitted by Anonymous on

"I may be wrong but it seems to me that there is alot of anti-TSA "spam" here."

Spam? I don't see ads for stuff we neither want nor need. I do see lots of very displeased people complaining about TSA abusing the traveling public.

Submitted by Anonymous on

"In your eyes it may seem that the patting down of children is absurd but the TSA is unable to make assunmptions about any individual coming through security and all persons who alarm or children being carried by sn adult who alarmed must get screened.

If you did research and thought about the logic behind TSA screening infants you would find that there have been multiple incidents where children and infants have been used as suicide bombers and terrorists.

Children are vulnerable and for a suicide bomber they may be a prime choice to try and get past the security process."


How many children suicide bombers have there been in the US? Why wasn't this procedure put into place in the 60's when VC used children as bomb delivery systems? How do the Europeans handle infants and children? Do they make the assumption that all infants and children are nothing but wanna be bombers or do they assume innocent until found guilty?

Submitted by Anonymous on

I wrote two posts related to a specific question that were barred by the administrator. None had fowl language, and the question was perfectly pertinent (won't post it again to see if this message gets through).

I do not believe the Delete-O-Meter! Much more is being deleted!! Considering how many negative posts are here, that thought is rather scary!!

Submitted by Phil on

In response to my previous comment, someone anonymously wrote:

"Please ensure that if you post a link to letter that you want everyone to read, you read the letter yourself."

I've read that letter many times. I'm very familiar with it. In fact, I quoted the entire thing in the comment thread of another post of this blog.

"It is true that it is not required to show ID"

Right. That's what I stated that the letter confirmed, and indeed it does. (As does the TSA's Web site.)

"however if you do not show ID you will be subject to secondary(additional) screening."

I never suggested otherwise. You are not required to present any credentials (to present documents which can be used in the process of identifying you; to "show I.D.") when flying domestically in the United States. Many people incorrectly believe otherwise.

For more information, see "What's Wrong With Showing ID" at The Identity Project.

Submitted by Anonymous on

re: "If you did research and thought about the logic behind TSA screening infants you would find that there have been multiple incidents where children and infants have been used as suicide bombers and terrorists."

Please enlighten us and list some of your several incidents of children being used as suicide bombers and terrorist that you refer to. How many in the Northern Hemisphere?

TSA is a larger threat to freedom than any terrorist!

Submitted by Anonymous on

"Sandra is the best though. Appalled at children being patted down!! I guess we are the only country in the world that does it? BTW, the correct name is a "Process"! The reason that the child is being processed 99% of the time is because the Airline you purchased your tickets from....called for it!!"

You really have missed the point, in less of course you don't think child abuse is a problem. Sexual abuse of their children by strangers is a concern of every parent. TSO's are not immune to arrest for child abuse. Sandra's concern is understandable, your comment shows a blatant disregard for human rights. If the TSO next to you is a pedophile, are you going to cover for him? Do you really think child abuse is a subject for your mockery?

Submitted by Anonymous on

Anonymous said...
Figure this one. I have a TSA approved lock (i.e., one for which the TSA has a key) for my suitcase, although I usually carry on. On one flight recently, however, I checked my bag .. but forgot to lock the suitcase. Thus, the lock was attached and secured, but not preventing the suitcase from being opened. When the bag arrived, the lock was removed, gone. Only a TSA person could have removed the lock.

March 23, 2008 11:44 AM



I work in bags and I see locks that have fallen off via the belt system all the time. Sometimes they don't lock all the way (even tho we think that they do) sometimes they pop open, sometimes they get ripped off. I'm sorry that that happened to you but it is not always TSA's fault.

Anonymous said...
On a direct flight from Memphis to Detroit, jewelry was stolen from my suitcase. The jewelry was packed inside of a box, which was packed inside of a zipped up bagged. The jewelry were the only items taken, and no card was left to indicate that my luggage had been searched. I know that my suitcase had been tampered with, because the zippers were in a different location than where I put them. The only time my suitcase was out of my possession was when I turned it in to the TSA people at the airport in Memphis.

The only way someone could have known that the jewelry was there was via Xray. My claims with TSA and the airlines were denied.

Now, you tell me - who could have pulled off this theft? It MUST have involved a TSA employee, perhaps in cahoots with someone from the airlines.

In any case, DON'T TRUST ANYONE with TSA. They're human beings and not all of them are honest!

March 23, 2008 3:45 PM



Guess what? After a TSA personell gets done checking your bag (which at least at my airport is ALWAYS under a camera) it gets handed off to an airline worker. I would not risk my job for some jewlery most of my co-workers would not either.

Submitted by Courtney Utt on

i am a photographer who still shoots film. when i travel i usually take 60-80 rolls of 220 film with me. since all the new rules after 9/11, tsa employees routinely open every single plastic packaging of each roll of film, exposing the paper-backed film to the air (roll film is different from 35mm - it is not protected by a metal cannister). because i do not want to put 800asa roll film through the x-ray machine (film ends up with xray lines crosshatching the film) all of my film becomes exposed to the elements, causing the film to take in moisture, which can in turn ruin the film. is there anything i can do to protect my 800asa 220 roll film in the future?

Submitted by Anonymous on

Comment-curious as to whether or not spurs on western boots pose a possible weapons threat. Did I also mention knitting needles of various number sizes. Anyone with any knowledge of close quarters contact know that either of the above mentioned items can and will do serious or fatal results. Yet I consistantly see these items being passed through security w/o as much as a look at. Want to witness unqualified, untrained TSA officers, try Fairbanks, AK. I travel through there two to three times a month. One never knows what to expect. Of course, neither do they. Just roll your eye and wonder how these folks were selected for this highly sensative position. Makes for a good time passing conversation with other travelers. Thank you.

Submitted by Anonymous on

It is so easy for people to bash TSA and what they do but in all reality the people who are making comments about TSA and how unprofessional they are and how they treat people like criminals (especially elderly, children and people with disabilites)are the ones who are on the outside looking in and have no idea what they are talking about.

Bottom line is that there will never be a time when all persons are satisfied with how the security process is. Right now people non-stop complain that TSA does too much and takes away too many items and screens people who should not be bothered with so they think security should be lessened.

But the second something happens and the nation is put in an uproar then TSA will be blamed because they did not do enough. TSA is in a lose-lose situation but continues to do their job day in and day out despite all the negativity made about them.

TSA as with any company is always trying to improve but nothing in life can ever be 100% error proof.

People are so quick to judge TSA and blame them for anything that goes wrong with flying, whether it be their flight being delayed, showing up late, something is missing from luggage, items are broke, what have you. TSA is not the fault of everyones problems and a sensible person would sit back and think about it for awhile and realize that TSA screeners are human just as anybody else.

Submitted by Anonymous on

To the lady complaining about the lotions and shampoos leaking all over her daughters clothes, it is called ZIPLOC bags and they sell them at stores so you can put your spillables in them and they will not leak.

I am not sure if you are familiar with an airplane and flying but there is such a thing called air pressure and unfortunately when a plane gets high in altitude containers and such tend to expand and burst. The same thing would happen if you brought a bag of chips on a plane unopened, the bag would expand. Just thought i would help you out.

Submitted by Anonymous on

This is in response to the person whose jewelry was stolen. I am sorry for your loss, but the TSO's are not the one and only people who have access to your baggage after you check it with the airlines. After the TSO's screen your luggage, there are at least three other people who handle the property. 1. the person who loads the bag on the tug to take it to the plane. 2. the person who unloads from the tug and onto the conveyor into the plane itself. and 3. (most likely of the three) the person in the belly of the plane loading and stacking the luggage where there is no (that I know of) cameras to keep watch on them.

Submitted by Anonymous on

I am a scientist, and as such I would like to see factual analysis of the efficacy of TSA screening.

The only scientific evaluation of TSA´s work I have found to date is published in the last issue of 2007 British Medical Journal (you can download it at www.bmj.com, archive, 2007, Dec 22). The article (Screening programme evaluation applied to airport security, by Eleni Linos, Elizabeth Linos and Graham Colditz) is very well put together and brings up important questions.

Could a TSA person on this blog please answer the questions in that article? Better still, could the TSA please publish a serious, peer reviewed work showing that its policies are effective?

Submitted by Anonymous on

First time to the Blog, SHEESH - nothing constructive just a bunch of crybabys with no common sense, venting their frustration about rules and regulations now that they consider themselves adults, I just see the 3rd graders complaining about having to remove their shoes to take a nap. As far as food and such thru the checkpoint for babies, I don't see any under fed kids out their in the lanes, on the contrary. just feed your kids b-4 you fly and use the drinking fountain inside security (poor baby)I always thought the proper terminolgy was "handy capable" stop using your old age or military background as a crutch to skate security. You will be playing golf when you land anyway.

GET OVER IT and FACE THE FACTS this is the way it is going to be from now on when you travel the friendly skies. You all probably yell at the McDonalds attendant TOO!

Submitted by Anonymous on

"This is in response to the person whose jewelry was stolen. I am sorry for your loss, but the TSO's are not the one and only people who have access to your baggage after you check it with the airlines. After the TSO's screen your luggage, there are at least three other people who handle the property. 1. the person who loads the bag on the tug to take it to the plane. 2. the person who unloads from the tug and onto the conveyor into the plane itself. and 3. (most likely of the three) the person in the belly of the plane loading and stacking the luggage where there is no (that I know of) cameras to keep watch on them."

It is TSA that created the opportunity for theft, however. Not properly resealing luggage, cutting off TSA approved locks, and doing nothing to prevent theft is the problem. Handing over the luggage in a non-secure condition just aggravates the situation, as well as annoying the public. Blaming the airline baggage handlers does nothing to make the situation more palatable to the public. The baggage security issue is the TSA's problem, if you wanted to resolve it you could. A tamper proof seal of some description together with a tag that stated that the bag had been searched, a time stamped tag inside the luggage, all would help resolve the issue of responsibility for theft. Some TSA employees have been let go or prosecuted for this very issue of theft.

Submitted by Anonymous on
On a direct flight from Memphis to Detroit, jewelry was stolen from my suitcase. The jewelry was packed inside of a box, which was packed inside of a zipped up bagged. The jewelry were the only items taken, and no card was left to indicate that my luggage had been searched. I know that my suitcase had been tampered with, because the zippers were in a different location than where I put them. The only time my suitcase was out of my possession was when I turned it in to the TSA people at the airport in Memphis.

Memphis is rather infamous for baggage thefts. I've had more things stolen from there than at any other airport. It is possible, also, that a TSA type was working in conjuction with one of the ramp rats. This doesn't bring back your jewelry. Next time carry it with you to keep the theives at bay.

The airlines don't allow for claims for expensive items (jewelry, laptops, medications, etc)in checked luggage because they know that they have both theives working for them and customers who file claims for non-existing items.
Submitted by Anonymous on

To the person whose jewelry was stolen - don't pack valuables in your luggage. This is written on just about every piece of travel literature. Either wear them or don't take them. Any many people have access to luggage, not just the TSA.

Submitted by Anonymous on

"First time to the Blog, SHEESH - nothing constructive just a bunch of crybabys with no common sense, venting their frustration about rules and regulations now that they consider themselves adults, I just see the 3rd graders complaining about having to remove their shoes to take a nap. As far as food and such thru the checkpoint for babies, I don't see any under fed kids out their in the lanes, on the contrary. just feed your kids b-4 you fly and use the drinking fountain inside security (poor baby)I always thought the proper terminolgy was "handy capable" stop using your old age or military background as a crutch to skate security. You will be playing golf when you land anyway.

GET OVER IT and FACE THE FACTS this is the way it is going to be from now on when you travel the friendly skies. You all probably yell at the McDonalds attendant TOO!"

Maybe you can get a role in TSA Gangstaz,(watch it on You Tube) Part2.... Seriously, you are guilty of the very whining that you complain about. Got a problem with "traveler envy"?
Do YOU have a problem with parents being concerned with the health, safety, and wellbeing of their children? Are you a parent? A good parent?

Submitted by Anonymous on

"I wince when seeing little children and the obviously disabled getting the 'treatment' from TSO's and have refrained from commenting. No more will I do that. Outrageous conduct, witnessed by me on the part of TSA will be reported to the local FSD and TSA hqtrs. I usually have lots of time on my hands while at the airport (arrive two hours early for check in and security screening)."

It is abuse, and should be stopped!
The more that this issue is brought to the attention of the blog,and to the public through the media, the more likely it will be addressed by TSA officials, hopefully before it becomes crisis management.

Submitted by Anonymous on

To me its the same neurotic anti-TSA posting here. What a waste of a valuable information tool for people who use the Air Ports, Ports and Railroads.

Never mind what the truth is, this mal-content is going to jam this blog with garbage.

To other TSO's who post here, do what you wish, but don't waste your time on this "passenger"!

Submitted by Winstonsmith on

Mr. Anonymous Scientist:

Thanks for posting the following:

The only scientific evaluation of TSA´s work I have found to date is published in the last issue of 2007 British Medical Journal (you can download it at www.bmj.com, archive, 2007, Dec 22). The article (Screening programme evaluation applied to airport security, by Eleni Linos, Elizabeth Linos and Graham Colditz) is very well put together and brings up important questions.

Could a TSA person on this blog please answer the questions in that article? Better still, could the TSA please publish a serious, peer reviewed work showing that its policies are effective?

March 25, 2008 6:56 AM

I have been asking the TSA now since I started posting to this forum to produce some kind of documentable proof that the tradeoffs they force upon the traveling public in terms of dollar cost and lost liberty in exchange for what appears to be effectively illusory security are worth it. One of the central themes of the many things that I have posted is that some security is necessary, but the extremes to which the TSA has gone, particularly with checkpoint security, are ridiculous; constitutionally questionable; morally repugnant; and sickening to anyone who values their rights and the sacrifices people have made to protect those rights in the past.

To date, no such proof has been offered. I doubt any such proof exists. There will be plenty of people who will respond in knee-jerk fashion to this by saying, "well prove that it hasn't." It is not for us to prove a negative. The TSA makes the claim that it protects. Let them prove to us that it has succeeded in its mission.

Submitted by Anonymous on

I don't like the new lanes TSA are making to get people threw faster.

What you are doing is giving blue print on how to figure out how and when to get something threw. This is by having a routine for the family lane or the business lane etc

The TSO's will fall into a routine and when that happens there will be problems

DT

Submitted by W Kamm on

"The TSO's will fall into a routine and when that happens there will be problems."

Not hardly, if the routine that they fall into is a routine of thorough, professional checks made to the best of their abilities and those of the equipment they use.

Submitted by Anonymous on

"To me its the same neurotic anti-TSA posting here. What a waste of a valuable information tool for people who use the Air Ports, Ports and Railroads.

Never mind what the truth is, this mal-content is going to jam this blog with garbage.

To other TSO's who post here, do what you wish, but don't waste your time on this "passenger"!"

This blog is an open forum. The moderators decide what gets posted.
What passes muster might not be for the thin skinned, especially people who are unable to accept and learn from the information shared here. It probably isn't a very easy job being a TSO, but there are some who do it well. My own concerns are about the ethical, fair, humane and non-abusive treatment on both the passenger and TSO sides of this debate. The elderly, the disabled, children, and TSO's all have the right to the same fair treatment.
Unfortunately, it begins with the TSO community. It is part of your job description to be courteous and professional. Barring some heroic action, your job probably won't get many accolades. Sadly, many people see what you do as an intrusion in their lives. This dialog might seed some changes. Who knows, but we can hope.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Dear Winstonsmith,

Thank you for supporting my petition for hard data from the TSA. Let us hope that more people read this and force some kind of information (which I also doubt exists) from these people.

Don't miss the British Medical Journal article. It is great!

Submitted by Anonymous on

This is the conclusion of the British Medical Journal article:

"Conclusion

Of course, we are not proposing that money spent on unconfirmed but politically comforting efforts to identify and seize water bottles and skin moisturisers should be diverted to research on cancer or malaria vaccines. But what would the National Screening Committee recommend on airport screening? Like mammography in the 1980s, or prostate specific antigen testing and computer tomography for detecting lung cancer more recently, we would like to open airport security screening to public and academic debate. Rigorously evaluating the current system is just the first step to building a future airport security programme that is more user friendly and cost effective, and that ultimately protects passengers from realistic threats."

Submitted by Anonymous on

A few of my favorite parts of the BMJ article:

"With such high value attached to airport security, the details of efficacy, precision, and cost effectiveness of screening methods are easy to ignore. Protection at any cost is a reassuring maxim for us jetsetters. But preventing any death—whether from haemorrhagic stroke, malignant melanoma, or diabetic ketoacidosis—is surely an equally noble cause. In most such cases, screening programmes worldwide are closely evaluated and heavily regulated before implementation. Is airport security screening an exception?"

"Since 1969, only 2000 people have died as a result of explosives on planes, yet the US department of homeland security spends more than $500m annually on research and development of programmes to detect explosives at airports. Even the devastating 11 September 2001 attacks caused around 3000 deaths, which is similar to the number of deaths attributed to high blood glucose each day13 or the number of children dying of the human immunodeficiency virus every three days worldwide."

"Furthermore, the cost of airport security ($9 per passenger) is 1000 times higher than for railway security ($0.01 per passenger), even though the number of attacks on trains is similar to that in planes. This is analogous to committing mammography resources to screening only the left breast, and ignoring the right side, even though cancer can affect both breasts."

"We systematically reviewed the literature on airport security screening tools. A systematic search of PubMed, Embase, ISI Web of Science, Lexis, Nexis, JSTOR, and Academic Search Premier (EBSCOhost) found no comprehensive studies that evaluated the effectiveness of x ray screening of passengers or hand luggage, screening with metal detectors, or screening to detect explosives. When research teams requested such information from the US Transportation Security Administration they were told that evaluating new screening programmes might be useful, but it was overshadowed by "time pressures to implement needed security measures quickly."

Submitted by Anonymous on

I had a extremely unpleasant encounter with the TSA officers while traveling through the San Diego airport SAN last saturday (March 22, 2008).

How it happened was that I somehow set off the metal detector alarm, I have absolutely no idea how that is possible because the ONLY metallic thing on my body was the underwire in my bra, and other people that I was traveling with were able to walk through with belts on, change in their pockets, jewelry, ect without setting off the same exact metal detector's alarm.

So, I was pulled inside and put into the "box" that is on the other side of the metal detectors. As I was standing in there, I politely asked if I or possibly one of the officers could retrieve my stuff which included a brand new laptop, a purse with cash, cellphone and bag, because other passengers were knocking my laptop around and moving it while retrieving their own bags, also I was concerned that my things could be stolen (since airports are one of the highest theft areas). The officer rudely snapped at me "You cannot leave here, and don't worry about your stuff." While I waited, my laptop was knocked onto the floor, and upon turning it on I found that the screen is now damaged. I was treated like a criminal and told to stand in the "box" and not allowed to even place my objects in a safe place.

Then they used the wand and patted me down as if I were a criminal. That wouldn't have been so bad if the security officers would not have been complete jerks (There other words that describe them much better).

While the officer was waving the wand over my chest area it kept going off, and it was mysteriously going off while passing over my shoulder. The officer rudely asked if I had anything metallic in my shoulder or chest area, and I told her maybe underwire in my bra, but I have no idea why it would be going off while passing my shoulder. Then the officer became even ruder with me. The she patted down my shoulder/chest area, and I was already wearing a skin-tight shirt, it was pretty obvious that there was nothing in this area of my body.

Then while searching my bag, the officer asked me if I had anything 'round' in my bag. I had a confused look and said "I'm not sure", and then the officer began to yell at me. I'm sorry that I did not take an inventory of the various shapes of the items that I had packed in my bag. "Do you have anything round?" is such a vague and off-hand question that my only quick on the response could be something like "I'm not sure." Then the officer opened my jewelry bag, and a piece of jewelry fell on the floor and the officer just stepped on it like it was nothing. When I reached to pick it up to place it on the table she yelled "DO NOT TOUCH THAT."

I really hate being treated like a criminal and my personal possessions treated like garbage.

The saddest thing is that my story isn't nearly as bad as other stories of read on this blog or reports that I have heard on the news. My heart goes out to all of the people who have been harassed and abused by TSA people.

Thank you TSA for allowing my brand new $2,000 computer to be broken. (I could not have it retrieved when I asked POLITELY, and of course laptops have to come out of their protective padded bags.)

Also, thank you TSA for treating me like a CRIMINAL.

The terrorists are getting what they wanted. Our civil liberties and freedoms are being chipped away one by one, and the Bill of Rights is being thrown out the window. I hope these TSA officers enjoy their jobs of treating innocent people like criminals and pieces of crap.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Hmmm, I suspect that the SOPs governing the day-to-day operations were written by career paper pushers with little thought given to the what-if senarios that engineers would have discussed.

Grammar correct?
Spelling correct?
Okay we're ready to use this as policy. I suspect that little thought went into reactions of US citizens, or the much longer lasting repercussions for a slip-shod, half baked, SOP. Homeland security and TSA have me shaking my head and wondering just what were they thinking when they put pen to paper.

From the TSA's own website:

3-1-1 for carry-ons = 3 ounce bottle or less (by volume) ; 1 quart-sized, clear, plastic, zip-top bag; 1 bag per passenger placed in screening bin. One-quart bag per person limits the total liquid volume each traveler can bring. 3 oz. container size is a security measure.

The rule limits the volume of liquids, gels and aerosols to bottles 3 ounces or smaller (or 100 ml), in 1 quart-sized zip top bag, and 1 bag per traveler.

All liquids, gels and aerosols must be in three-ounce or smaller containers. Larger containers that are half-full or toothpaste tubes rolled up are not allowed. Each container must be three ounces or smaller.

So just what is allowed? You lack consistancy even on the place, we fliers use. You wonder why you get so much grief over things like this. FYI 3oz doesn't equal 100mL.

Fix the minor details like this and your jobs will become easier.

Submitted by Anonymous on

The last few years my wife and I have traveled internationally. We had not traveled just with in the USA until this month.

We made a quick 4 day weekend trip and packed two small suitcases. One we checked and one we carried on during the out bound trip, as we were taking some Tequila to my brother in law to try.

On the way home we decided to carry both suitcases on board, something we have not had the opportunity to do for years.

We did not think about some of the liquids that tend to stay in the suitcase we normally check. The TSA people a John Wayne Airport were extremely nice in requesting permission to check our bag, and in explaining why. We knew better but had a brain fade as we were out of our normal routine.

I did have to remove my belt and watch, and go through the metal detector again. I was wearing the same belt and watch on the out bound trip, and did not set of the metal detector. Other wise I would have removed them to start with.

I understand different machines can have different levels of sensitivity.

I do not understand why there are different procedures from one airport to another. Most require shoes removed, a very few do not. This must be training and monitoring issue and should be corrected.

Overall we have no problem meeting and complying with the requirements. We have had very few TSA agents who were unfriendly, or difficult. I must say however, that the John Wayne TSA agents were the most pleasant I have ever meet.

Submitted by Anonymous on

re post by Duane on 03/21/2008 3:18 PM.

It has been mentioned in another blog that multiple attempts were made to respond to the post made by Duane.

TSA block all post advising Duane to contact local police for 1 1/2 days, a delay that could prevent an effective investigation of the incident.

I have to wonder if TSA places its agenda above the 8 year old citizen that went through the TSA checkpoint? What does TSA have to hide?

Smells like an attempt to cover-up the actions of a TSO.

TSA continues to disappoint!

Submitted by Marshall on

Here's another horror story from FlyerTalk about the TSA's treatment of a 2 year old child:

"I flew out of PHX Saturday March 8th with my wife and 2 year old and they seperated* my son from us and patted him down. I have filed a complaint with Office of Civil Rights which is part of TSA, but have not had any response in almost two weeks. I am spending time today writing my Congresswoman and Senator and trying to find some way to get this addressed. There were two people who wound up being very helpful, but two were hostile and had our 2 year placed on a chair against a wall and had us stand four feet away and turn our backs on him while they decided who was going to pat down my son.

I have heard repeatedly that people are horrified by this experience and they recommend I contact legal counsel."

*The TSA's website says they will NOT separate you from your child.

Among comments to the above were:

"This seems cruel. I know that there are many *$&%*##$ TSA types, but surely they don't condone cruelty to children. Is there any sort of logic or justification for isolating a 2 year old and making his parents turn away from him? Are there really TSA staff who are that sadistic, and others who would let such behavior go on without comment or correction?"

"A situation such as .....'s child endured could very well produce signs of trauma: not sleeping well, nightmares, fear of airports, clinging to parents, not wanting to go to nursery school/day care. What happened to him was despicable and it seems to be becoming the norm rather than an aberration."

"....consider filing an abuse complaint with the Phoenix PD"

The flying public, as others have said, must start to speak up. If you see the TSA treating a child or a disabled person with disrespect or in an abusive manner, speak up so that other people in line can hear you, point out the abusive treatment, call a police officer, call a supervisor..... don't wait until such things happen to you, take a stand for your fellow travelers.

I would love to see a coordinated day of civil disobedience at our airports, where thousands of people join together and say WE HAVE HAD ENOUGH.

Submitted by Anonymous on

I had an umbrella confiscated by the TSA at the Portland (Oregon) Memorial Coliseum prior to a Barack Obama rally because "it was too long."

only a few of us were tsa the were secret service. they were having tsa do their bag checks. their uniforms look really similar to ours. next time look around.

Submitted by Anonymous on

While traveling from Detroit with TSA approved locks---the fastening hole for the lock was snipped thereby making the lock useless. Looks like someone needs glasses. We were following the "directive" for having TSA approved locks. Hmmmm.

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