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Gripes & Grins, Part 2 (Commenting Disabled)

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Comments

Submitted by Anonymous on

I have read many of the blogs posted and couldn't resist commenting. I have to congratulate the TSA for this blog idea. Strategicly, it is important for two reasons. First is allows customers to blow off steam and secondly it lets TSA employees know that they are being watched. Both have great benefit to TSA Management. As to most of the comments posted. Many remind me of comments from a two year old. It is disappointing how Americans grip about the littlest things and throw out how their "rights" have been violated. We have such an entitlement mentality. Have people forgotten WHY the TSA is doing this? I for one am happy to stand in line an extra hour at the airport, take my shoes off or give up my precious water bottle if it means my fellow Americans don't get blown up in a plane! Come on people....get a clue! Obviously you don't have enough drama in your life to keep you entertained. You certainly haven't managed a large initiative like this which requires consistency across multiple locations with employees that have varing skill levels. OH yes...and on a tight budget. If you complainers think you could do a better job....then step up. Having said all this, it is appropriate to post comments where policy may have been abused. These comments are most appropriate. In doing so I don't think all the attitude and superior comments are necessary.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Please explain why a procedure cannot be developed to address travelers with medical conditions like joint replacements, especially middle-aged and elderly who clearly are not in the profile of a terrorist. I was in the hospital recuperating from total hip replacement surgery on 9/11 and was given a card to verify this. I have had several experiences when I felt violated because of a TSA screener groping my breasts. The metal detector did not go off during the physical screening why do they have to handle my breasts? I am for airport security however it seems to me alot of time and effort is wasted on over screening people with legitimate reasons for setting off the metal detectors and are the least likely to be terrorists. Some screeners are rude while some are understanding and considerate.

Submitted by Anonymous on

I heard about this blog this morning on the news, and I was shocked that you have given people the opportunity to complain about bad experiences. You have opened Pandora's box- but I think this is a good opportunity for people to express their concerns.
I for one don't care that I have to remove my shoes, my belt my hair clips, my liquids/etc- if it is going to keep me and others safe than so be it. What I do hate is the "flyers" who show up late for their flights and get crappy towards all the TSA people who are just doing their jobs. Next time show up early like the rest of us that way you wont need to be mean and nasty towards the employees.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Saw the piece on GMA this morning. I've wanted to comment on airport security for a long time. Here's the thing that disturbs me the most.

You go to an airport, and it's as though you've left America. It looks and feels like we live in one of those countries we've always thought of as inferior, less free, in which even citizen movement is government-controlled.

I find the military-style, overbearing government presence disturbing. I find it disturbing that you cannot even express displeasure. It looks and feels, for all the world, like an old-style communist country.

I fly only when I have to now. I hate to think of America this way. You know what I hate even more? I hate that I thought twice about posting on this blog, because I can no longer trust our government not to track down anyone who criticizes it. I'm posting anyway, and I sure hope that I don't end up on one of your "no fly" lists. You know, the ones that innocent people are placed on and can never get off because the bureaucracy just doesn't work that way.

So, I'll post this anonymously, although I am certain you could get my name, address, political affiliation, and underwear size if you wanted to.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Last summer I was bumped on a flight from Indianapolis to Minneapolis and wound up taking an alternative flight which connected in Kansas City. Once in Kansas I went out of our secured gate in order to get a Starbucks. I had no luggage, purse or anything except two coffees. Going through the security at the gate I did not cause an alarm yet I had an overzealous TSA agent whose sexual orientation became questionable as she pulled out my waistband and looked down the front of my pants - UNACCEPTABLE! As I watched from the sidelines I saw this female TSA agent feel women's breasts, look down more pants and behave inappropriately to many women. I have traveled all over the world and never received treatment as poor as this. Maybe someone will file a class action lawsuit that I can get in on?

Submitted by Anonymous on

I am a frequent traveler out of EWR (Newark Airport) Terminal B and everytime I go through TSA I am treated like a criminal. The employees there are always on their phones, downgrading you, screaming at you, don't seem to care and just want to make there money and go home. It doesn't seem that "US" meaning the passengers are the only ones being treated like this as well as I have seen airline crew and pilots being screamed at and put to shame as well which is uncalled for. They have no manners and it doesn't kill you to say please or thank you once in a while. Mentally when you get through the process of TSA at Newark Terminal B you are so mentally drained, tested and upset that some of the times you don't want to fly.

The employees at Newark Terminal B TSA are just trouble waiting to happen! I think that this should be one of the airports that should be looked at next. And of course when I go through any other airport (not all but some) it is so relaxing and a pleasure to go through TSA check point.Just don't understand why all the TSA employees at Terminal B are so nasty and unhappy people?

Submitted by Steve on

I shake my head at the throngs of people who complain about the TSA. If taking my shoes off at the airport allows me to safely get back from another trip and see my kids than I am happy to comply.

The system may not be perfect but I prefer this system to the alternative that is to scary to mention. Next time you are miserable, think of everyone who didn't make it back from the fateful 9/11 flights and then let me know how you feel.

The TSA is doing a thankless job that is part of stressful air travel for all of us. Get there early, be patient and be thankful when you land at your destination safely.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Why are people who are members of airline "elite" programs permitted faster access to TSA airport security checks? Does TSA work for the airlines, or am I paying for TSA through my taxes?

Submitted by Anonymous on

Why are people who are members of airline "elite" programs permitted faster access to TSA airport security checks? Does TSA work for the airlines, or am I paying for TSA through my taxes?

Submitted by Anonymous on

I think the TSA agents at Henal Montana Airport are number one. They are very efficient and friendly. Thanks from a frequent flyer.

Submitted by Anonymous on

As a very frequent flier (2-4 planes a week), my greatest concern is the lack of any critical thinking, or judgement on the part of TSA folks. A couple of weeks ago I flew out of Rhinelander Airport a tiny regional airport and boarded a small (16 passenger) jet to Minn. The idea that this airport is a staging area for terrorists is far fetched at best. Out of the 12 people boarding this flight one - an elderly gentleman at least 80 yrs old with a metal hip replacement was pulled out of line, had every bag thoroughly searched wanded several times, and basically was given the complete search treatment. The idea that this elderly man in rural northern Wisc. boarding a small jet was any type of threat is abdolutely ludicrous, a nine-year old girl could have taken this poor old man out.
Over and over again I see the elderly, mothers with children as the most frequent passengers that end up being searched. This lack of basic COMMON SENSE on the part of TSA officials suggests that either TSA screeners are too tied to a policy to use any discretion or they lack the intellegence to identify a real threat - in either case these rules/people do nothing to keep us safe.

Submitted by Anonymous on

I just heard about this blog on an ABC sunday morning news segment.

I travel about 75,000 miles per year, all domestic travel.

1. THANK YOU for creating a blog to hear from real passengers.

2. THANK YOU for keeping us safe. At the end of the day, no US planes have gone down since 9/11; the most important thing is the outcome (no "successful" terrorist attacks).

3. I find TSA screeners to be professional, courteous and I'm glad they are there.

4. I have a titanium "rod" inside my Tibia with several titanium screws. Titanium is not a ferro-magnetic metal, and as a result, it does NOT trigger the metal detecters at the airports. Why then don't the "bad guys" try to fabricate a handgun out of titanium? And a bullet/shell casing out appropriate non-ferro-magnetic metals?

5. The place I do not feel safe: San Francisco and San Jose, California. Why? the security people seem to be contractors rather than TSA, and they are all Chinese nationals who are NOT citizens of the USA.

6. Some times, it seems the amount of time each screener at the X-Ray machine spends on each bag going thru the conveyer belt is about 5x the average. I'm VERY GLAD they are taking the time to sceen everything carefully... but maybe that means the faster screening isn't as thorough.

7. Really, you don't make anyone safer by doing in depth searches of blonde haired, blue eyed 9 year old girl scounts flying to the mid-west. You really should focus on people who look like the last 2 dozen terrorists. It is OK to profile "terrorists" based on what they look like.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Retraining needed at Seattle-Tacoma airport ASAP! TSA racially profiles at this location.

Why do 2 TSA "officers" need to see a boarding pass before I even check in my bags?

Why does TSA need to follow me as I check in my bag? These people would probably open my bag on the sidewalk and spread it's contents on the ground if they had the authority.

I have also had the experience of extremely slow lines at this location. The entire airport was filled with people waiting to be checked through security. Not until upper management in suits talked to the screeners, & then watched from above, did the line actually move. Perhaps the upper management should watch from above 24 hours a day so they may see the mismanagement of this airport!

Submitted by Anonymous on

I had a knee replacement in Oct 2007 and flew for the first time after that in Jan 2008. Even though I showed the TSA agents in both airports (PHL and MCO) the scar, I was still wanded. The area around the incision is very tender and even though I asked that my skin not be touched, the agents ran the wand over my skin anyway, causing me great discomfort. Because I was being hand-searched, my bra area was also wanded (I wear an underwire). None of this was done in a private area and I found the whole experience extremely humiliating. I will be flying again in two weeks between PHL and RAP (first class this time). How can I avoid being so embarrassed and hurt?

Submitted by Down's Mom on

This happen in the first week of march 2008. We were flying home from Orlando Flordia back to Michigan, we were on my daughters make a wish trip. My daughter is 6 years old who has down syndrome, severs asthma and other health issues. She is in a wheelchair, on oxygen always and cognitively inpared her mentaily age is about 2 to 3 years old. The TSA people in Detroit were wonderful with us, we have never flown before so this was all new so they walked us throught all of that because we had special machines we needed to take with us. But flying home from Orlando airport to Metro airport was a trip i will never take again! First of all we were not allow to take the oxygen we were renting past the security check point. My daughter was already sick and having really bad asthma attacks and needed the oxygen. we were told that because be had it on the plane that the airport would supply it for us and they did not. We told to Tsa person at the check point and they did noting about it but say ya she is in respitory distress. And then the second part was to check my daughter who is already in respitory distress they take her away from me and out of my site. I do not care if you have to check her i can follow rules but to take a minor and a disable minor out of a parents site is not right. They made me go back in the line and wait for all of our bags to be checked. So durning that time when my daughter was out of my site i have no clue what happend to her and the scary part is she can't tell me. Then they leave her in her wheelchair all alone waiting along the side, no one watching after her in this day and age someone could have just come behind her and started pushing her and she would not know what to do she would just go along with it. Oh yes i almost forgot all the yelling thats was thrown at me because i didn't say that i had medal in the machines i was carrying on. An to say anything to anyone is a joke because they just kept telling me to you want to fly today. Yes i needed to because my daughter needed to seek medical attention we knew that we had to get back to her doctors. But just a little fyi know that when we landed in metro my daughter was rushed to the University of Michigan Hospital and was put on life support and we almost lost her she had to be put on ECMO which is a heart and lung bipass machine and i am writiing you this letter from her hospital room because today is day 55 and we are still here. Just because i could not get oxygen in the airport! I am also following up with the complaint department and will take this as far as i can be heard so this does not happen to someone else!

Submitted by Catinlap 1 on

Please show some consideration for handicapped passangers. I turn my walker in at the screening point, then I simply ask for a hand to help me get through the metal detector. Screeners say, "No, I can't do that!" Then they put me into a thorough screening group where they put their hands all over my body. Too often, I get preselected for thorough screening just because I have a walker. Now, this is very painful because I have multiple ruptured cervical disks with associated fibromyalgia and pinched nerves. I now only fly when I absolutely have to do so.

Submitted by Anonymous on

We have to take our shoes off because someone put a bomb in their shoe. We have to use 3oz liquid bottles because there was a plan to use liquids as a bomb. We have to stand through metal detectors because 9/11 hijackers used box cutters. So why then is everyone placing the blame on the TSA and their screening process? Its the terrorists fault that we have to go through all this. If the govt WASNT trying to protect us then people would be complaining about that too. Americans, we want it all yet its never enough.

Submitted by Anonymous on

On December 17, 2008, my sister and I left for Costa Rica from Chicago O’Hare Airport. I had broken my wrist one week previously, and had a metal plate inserted in my wrist, so was not surprised when the beeper went off. However, I was surprised at the treatment I received.

Before I went through the metal detector, I was in line and picked up a bin in which to place my belongings. One of the TSA employees moved the bag away from me. I said, “Excuse me,” and moved it back to me. She replied in a defensive manner, “I was just moving it!” I wanted to say, “Yes, but it’s my bin and I don’t want you to move it!” Instead I gave her the evil eye.

So I took off my shoes with my one available arm, put all my belongings in the bin, and then took of the brace on my arm and put that in the bin. I then went through the metal detector, and the beeper went off. I was placed in a glass cage and was stuck there for 15 minutes. It was explained to me that a female employee would be over soon to finish the process. 20 feet away were two female TSA employees talking to each other. One of them was the rude person who moved the bin. I was informed she was the supervisor. I was upset because all of my stuff was still not in my possession and I had no confidence that someone else would not walk off with it.

In the meantime, my sister (who was also recuperating from a broken wrist suffered 6 weeks earlier), had gone through another line, and had no idea what had happened to me. She could not see me from where she was. She looked and looked for me, but finally gave up and walked to the gate for our flight, deciding I must have gotten through quickly and was down the hall.

I saw a man placed in the glass cage next to me who was seen immediately by a guard and got through. I, on the other hand, was waiting, and waiting, and waiting for someone to come over the finish the security process. No one came. The female employee guarding me was trying to get the attention of the supervisor, but without any means of communicating with her - other than leaving her post and risking me walking out of the cage - she had no way of getting attention. She tried to be nice in spite of me asking her too many questions and expressing my anger. When I banged on the glass trying to get someone to notice, she gave me the impression that I had better stop before something more dreadful happened that I wouldn’t like. So I continued to wait and be totally frustrated. I didn’t have the brace on my arm (that was back with my stuff to which I couldn’t get access), I didn’t know where my sister was, and I couldn’t get through this awful process.

Finally some nice female employee came out of nowhere and finished the process (which turned out to be fairly simple) and I continued on my way. I couldn’t find my sister anywhere, so I finally went down the hall to the flight gate where I found my sister.

I hope that you find a better way of processing seniors suffering from physical ailments – or anyone else for that matter. The next time I have to fly (in August) I will call ahead and see what I can do to avoid a recurrence of that procedure. In the meantime, perhaps your new efforts will make a difference for people who travel by plane.

Submitted by Bob on
down's mom said... This happen in the first week of march 2008. We were flying home from Orlando Flordia back to Michigan, we were on my daughters make a wish trip. My daughter is 6 years old who has down syndrome, severs asthma and other health issues. She is in a wheelchair, on oxygen always and cognitively inpared her mentaily age is about 2 to 3 years old. The TSA people in Detroit were wonderful with us, we have never flown before so this was all new so they walked us throught all of that because we had special machines we needed to take with us. But flying home from Orlando airport to Metro airport was a trip i will never take again! First of all we were not allow to take the oxygen we were renting past the security check point. My daughter was already sick and having really bad asthma attacks and needed the oxygen. we were told that because be had it on the plane that the airport would supply it for us and they did not. We told to Tsa person at the check point and they did noting about it but say ya she is in respitory distress. And then the second part was to check my daughter who is already in respitory distress they take her away from me and out of my site. I do not care if you have to check her i can follow rules but to take a minor and a disable minor out of a parents site is not right. They made me go back in the line and wait for all of our bags to be checked. So durning that time when my daughter was out of my site i have no clue what happend to her and the scary part is she can't tell me. Then they leave her in her wheelchair all alone waiting along the side, no one watching after her in this day and age someone could have just come behind her and started pushing her and she would not know what to do she would just go along with it. Oh yes i almost forgot all the yelling thats was thrown at me because i didn't say that i had medal in the machines i was carrying on. An to say anything to anyone is a joke because they just kept telling me to you want to fly today. Yes i needed to because my daughter needed to seek medical attention we knew that we had to get back to her doctors. But just a little fyi know that when we landed in metro my daughter was rushed to the University of Michigan Hospital and was put on life support and we almost lost her she had to be put on ECMO which is a heart and lung bipass machine and i am writiing you this letter from her hospital room because today is day 55 and we are still here. Just because i could not get oxygen in the airport! I am also following up with the complaint department and will take this as far as i can be heard so this does not happen to someone else! April 27, 2008 2:58 PM

We would like to look into this further, but will need more information to do so.

Please post a comment with your flight itinerary, air carrier, departure time, etc. Also, if you can remember the lane you went through or a description of the officers, that would help as well.

If you like, you can also leave your name and contact info.

We will not publish your info.

Thanks,

Bob

TSA EoS Blog Team
Submitted by Anonymous on

My wife and I are in our eighties and have done considerable traveling over the years. She now has had hip replacement and uses a wheelchair in the airports. We are appreciative of the help offered by mosty of the airports but she is quite disturbed by the requirements for her security checks. Being scanned is not a problem for her but being asked to stand for a lengthy time, being patted down along with the scan does cause her some consternation. Most TSA workers are polite and often seem uncertain just what they are supposed to do with this eighty year old who rings the bells. She does carry a card from her doctor with the information about her hip. My question is always what is there about an eighty year old woman in a wheelchair that is so threatening to airport security?
Rev. Frank M. Burch

Submitted by Anonymous on

We now are able to carry on one bag and one personal item. Since I have to carry a computer, I carry a small, soft handbag that I can put in my carryon bag before I board. On occasion a TSA agent will remind me "two bags", but when I tell them it goes in my larger bag after I clear security (so I can put my ID away, and possibly buy a meal near the gate) they are generally OK with it since it's clearly nylon and stuffable. Not so last week in Oakland, when the agent pulled me out of line and made me put the bag in my rollaboard before entering the security screening area. I told him I would onkly have to pull it out again after clearing security, but he had his little power thing going and made me do it anyway. I do this every week-I know how to manage getting on a plane and don't really need a babysitter.

Submitted by Anonymous on

I have one question: why are we so paranoid as a country to have such ridiculous screening? What is the point of living in the country of the "free" with all these rights, when they really don't exist at all? I'm not saying that other countries don't have it rougher, but let's be realistic! Why do we give up so much for a little security? There is absolutely no privacy anymore... Packing my luggage has now become a "process," just so I can make sure that I don't have anything in my carry on that would be deemed "explosive!" The days of overnighters with a carry on are practically gone... unless you're gonna buy a whole bunch of stuff on the other end. What has the world come to?



Come on now are you kidding me! I think we have forgotten about that terrible day of 911 and richard reid. You people wouldn't be saying that if you were sitting on a plane and someone stood up and had a bomb vest on. Get real!! Wake Up!!! This isn't the 1960's anymore!! We are at War!!!

Submitted by Anonymous on

On Monday April 28th at about 5:45a, I went through BWI's new Checkpoint Evolution. The new look was interesting and they had some nice technology. It seems like there were a ton of TSA employees around. The difficulty was that my normal 5 minute trip through security (which was great!) turned into 20-25 minutes. 20-25 minutes doesn't sound bad, but when you have it timed for 5 minutes it makes things a little tighter. Hopefully everyone is just learning the new system and the speed will improve soon. It looked like they might have less lines open which I don't really understand.

Submitted by Anonymous on

We travel to New Orleans annually, one of the reasons being that we love the food. Last week we wanted to bring home some of the delicious olive salad made by one of the local delis.

Standing in line to show our IDs, have our boarding passes checked, etc., we were behind a young man who only had a photocopy of his driver's license as ID. After some back and forth the agent let him through.

We put our carry-ons containing two sealed quarts of olive salad ($13 each) through the scanner. When the agent asks us what it is, we explain and ask them to unwrap it and see for themselves.

TSO: "This is a liquid. It has to go in a three-ounce container."

Me: "It's olive salad, fer godsakes, It's food. Here, I even saved the receipt."

TSO: "It's liquid. You can check it in your bags [already on the plane] or leave it here."

My wife: "OK, I'll pour off the little bit of liquid in this garbage can and we'll take what's left."

TSO: "That's not going to happen."

Me: "This is moronic."

TSO: "Blame it on Washington. They make the rules."

Me: "Yeah but aren't you allowed to used some common sense?"

TSO: "Keep it up sir and you won't be flying today."

End of discussion.

Someone posts here as "WinstonSmith." Your average American probably has no idea that he's taken the name of the main character in Orwell's "1984," who refuses to knuckle under to Big Brother. Sure, something like olive spread may seem trivial, but it's more evidence that we are already living in Orwell's nightmare society.

America is saved from the deadly threat of olive salad. Somewhere a real terrorist is grinning and thinking "We've won!"

Submitted by Anonymous on

Just as a follow-up, when I related the olive salad story to a friend who traveled to New Orleans a week later, she responded:
"They never batted an eye at my little container of leek salad from
the farmers market on Magazine St. It was drenched in olive oil and in a
flimsy little plasitc container."

Submitted by Anonymous on

My husband and I just returned from a cruise in the Carribean and a few days visit in South Florida. Our return flight was out of Ft Lauderdale International. We checked in two hours early and the TSA agents definitely had plenty of time to go through our stuff. And go through our stuff they did. Not only was everything shifted and moved, pockets were rifled through and personal items that were in the upper compartment (KOTEX pads)were removed and put into to clothing. Needless to say these were tossed as they had been handled. (How gross is that.) Also left behind were two dirty kleenexes (YUK!!). Aside from the mess they left with the lotions and shampoo bottles opened and in our clothes (these were packed by me in plastic) the most disconcerting thing was that the agent rummaged through a closed envelope of reciepts and specifically pulled out was our reciept for car rental in Antiga that had bee placed with our books. (My bad...yes, but it never occured to me that they would actually take the time to look through these. That certainly won't happen again.)

And we are supposed to trust these people because they are protecting us. Give me a break!

Let me tell you I would rather fly out of Mexico where your bags are checked in front of you and then sealed in front of you before check-in. It might take a few more minutes but the way I look at it is I can have the confidence of knowing that the inspector is not going to pilfer anything or potentially ruin my clothing. The TSA agents should be required to do all checking under duel control when done out of passenger view and be in area where they are being filmed...no ifs ands or buts. In addition they really should be checking the bags upon check-in in front of the passenger. I would rather get to the airport spend a few extra minutes at check in than to find out 6-10 hours later that something had been taken out of my bag or that a bottle of shampoo had been removed from the plastic bag and left on my clothing. The sad thing is that the majority of what they went through was dirty clothes and our toiletry items. We had a few books but all valuables we had on our person. You cannot tell me that going through dirty clothes and bottles of toiletries we are required to put in our bags necissitates bags being rifled through when they can see those items on their equipment. Makes me as a passenger wonder whether or not we are truly being protected. And going through pockets and envelopes....gee I wonder what that agent was looking for? Money perhaps, credit card numbers...

Plus they did not leave the required paper in our bags indicating they had been gone through, just a red TSA dot on our luggage tag. Ipacked these bags myself and unpacked them as well...just to make sure they had not taken anything. While it appears nothing was taken I am concerned that the agent may have pilferred our credit card. Which has been cancelled.

That is why when my son marries in Mexico this summer we are driving our truck the 1600 miles one-way. I wouldn't want them to disrespect the wedding dress and bridemaids dresses we will be carrying like they did my dirty clothes that I had carefully packed and layed according to their directions. Not to mention the possibility that they just might decide to do a little side pilfering of wedding presents.

I find it incredibly hard to respect what these people do and even more difficult to believe they really are protecting me as a traveler. It is a joke that we cannot carry water or food with us and we are expected to try and consume the garbage food found in most terminals. Next we will be expected to purchase disposable cameras and throw out our electronic devices...which I happen to think are more potentially dangerous than the liquids found in most carry-ons. The TSA could solve the distrust many travelers have by making sure to hire educated professionals to inspect on site at check-in luggage being checked then sealing in front of the traveler to assure that the bag will not be further opened. This would deter people trying to sneak through contrabanded items and they could arrest those people on the spot carrying bombs, illegal drugs and substaces, in addition to articles that can be made into items of mass destruction.

It seems to me we are protecting ourselves from ourselves instead of really focusing on the real problem. Instead we are just making traveling more difficult for the masses and seriously wasting our tax dollars that could be better spent.

Submitted by Anonymous on

One of the biggest gripes I have is the need to show ID at 3+ checkpoints, some often times a mere 2 or 3 steps from the last. Instead of wasting TSA resources with such petty ID checks why not post one of those TSA agents to walk through the line asking if anyone has questions before they get to the checkpoint. Many people may think they know what to do (or are afraid to ask) only to find out that once they are at the checkpoint they must do something else. If the TSA would be more proactive in assisting rather than standing back and reacting maybe some of the problems could be prevented before they happen.

Submitted by Anonymous on

I have had two incidents of missing items from my suitcase while flying out of LAX. One of my friend had his video camera stolen from his checked in luggage.

Recently, my daughter flew in from Hong Kong to LAX. Upon reaching home she found that her TSA lock was missing. To make matters worse, her expensive Chanel sunglass was also missing from the suitcase.

It is extremely annoying to see such pilferage from checked luggage. Who does one blame for such losses and where can one lodge a complaint? No passenger is going to sit and comb through each and every item inside their luggage at the airport to see what is missing. The fingers can be pointed towards either TSA or the luggage handlers. In the past, when we could keep our luggage securely locked, there were very rare instances of lost items but now it seems to have become more common. I travel frequently and its a pity to see such losses. How can I claim such losses from my insurance company without any proper proof?

Submitted by Anonymous on

There simply has to be a better way for the TSA to inspect the checked in luggage instead of having to either use TSA approved locks or keeping your suitcase unlocked. If they want to randomly inspect any such checked in luggage then they should point it out in front of the passenger and do a thorough check up and then seal it so that everything is in order and there is less likely chance of pilferage.

Submitted by Hektikshok on

To speed up the xray process, why not post a sign at the conveyor that tells the people to PUSH there baggage onto the belt, instead of just standing there waiting for instructions wondering why the bags aren't moving. We should see at least a 20% improvement in processing. And speaking of improving the speed of the xrays, instruct the person sitting at the screen to stay focused on the job and not chit chat the the other Tsa employees whoile our bags are just sitting there or while we wait for the bags to come out the other end. Disney has monitors which explain how the process works, so consider a screen with a loop tape that tells newbie travelers how to proceed efficiently through the line.

Hi Bill,

At my airport we have numerous signs and monitors with instructions on how to handle various items when coming to the check point.

And they're all a useless waste of money... everyday I have to point out the sign that somebody claims doesn't exist.

Submitted by Phil on

On May13, 2008, at 08:40 -07:00, someone anonymously wrote:

"One of the biggest gripes I have is the need to show ID at 3+ checkpoints, some often times a mere 2 or 3 steps from the last."

Although TSA would like you to believe otherwise, you are not required to show ID to government agents in order to fly domestically in the United States.

After I filed a complaint with TSA about the incorrect TSA signs at the Kansas City International Airport, Jeanne Oliver, Associate Director, TSA Office of the Executive Secretariat, wrote to me in response, confirming the lack of ID requirement, but providing no indication that the signs would be corrected.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Thursday at ATL, with every line jammed, our line ran out of bins. The man 4 in front of me politely asked for more. No response from the TSA. The man asked a little louder. Crickets could be heard chirping. Another man asked even louder for more bins. The TSA guy at the x-ray screen stared intently at a display under which nothing had passed for 90 seconds. The guy at the magnetometer stared at the arch through which nobody had passed in 90 seconds. Crickets chirped. Nobody made eye contact. Nobody acknowleged that any request had been made. Finally, I yelled as loud as I could that perhaps those of us who paid the taxes might get some response from our employees. See if we had bins we could all then load our explosive shoes and incendiary shampoo into bins as required. Only then did the TSA respond, and only then to finally announce that they would be working on it shortly. Maybe the TSA could hand out numbers and then they'd be exactly like the DMV, where the customer is scorned and each employee does only the minimum necessary to make it through the day.

Submitted by Anonymous on

My guess is this won't even get read...since I'm not traveling in one of the selected feedback airports.

I would like to express my concern of the care taken of luggage during my recent baggage inspection experience at LGA airport in New York. I carefully tucked the baggage straps and handles for all 4 luggage pieces from my family into the side pocket of a pricey duffle bag. This bag was inspected and the side pocket was left completely unzipped! During the flight 3 of the 4 handles/straps were lost. This is quite disappointing as now all 3 of these bags are basically rendered useless for future traveling as I have no comfortable way to carry them. I took the time to carefully stow them to avoid the straps being caught during the flight. Of course I am grateful that TSA checks bags, but please have the decency to finish the job you have started. I am now left with almost one thousand dollars of useless luggage that I do not have the money to replace.

Submitted by Anonymous on

I was very unimpressed with the quality of service at the Detroit Spirit Airline gate a few weeks back. The TSA agents were rude at best. I, like many others am frustrated by the liquids ban and the fact that if you screw up and try and take of cup of coffee through the gate, you may get mauled. I appreciate what they are doing and why they are there, but they are paid to do a job and the fact is they work for the public and I therefore insist on good quality service with a smile.

Submitted by Dr S Morgan on

I just returned from a visit to the midwest for graduation ceremonies. I found my bag had been searched, which typically does not bother me. What bothered me tremendously, was that they failed to place things back in the zipped section of the suitcase, or at the very least they left the zipper un-zipped. Then they failed to reattach the elastic holders which connect together to keep the clothes from being tossed about in the suitcase (they were connected when I packed my case). Because of this, my clothing was a mess, smelled like perfume (this was in the zippered pocket so it could not get on my clothing if the cap should dislodge), and was covered in lotions (also in the zippered pockets). If you are going to go through people's baggage, please respect their items, their packing, and make every attempt to return it to prior. This is blatant disrespect.

Submitted by Alex V on

Like many other frequent travelers, I consider myself a "road warrior". I spend quite a bit of my week traveling by plane. I have to carry a tool case as part of my job. I don't mind the additional time required for screening. My complaint is the condition of my case after review (as I pick it up from the baggage carousel). Most of the time, my box is in dis-array, the hinges are broken and the last visit, my TSA approved lock was broken. There is never anything missing, but it takes me about half an hour to re-organize it only to have it messed with on my return travel. Can I file a claim for the hinges and the locks? Thanks for the time to read this posting.

Submitted by Steph on

As a frequent traveler (2-3 times per week) I wanted to make a couple comments.

1. I recently used the "ski lane" approach at the Oakland airport (I normally fly out of SFO). I think this is a great idea especially for someone who travels so much. My problem was that most people did not notice the signs. They looked for the shortest line and there was no one from the TSA directing people. I was in the expert line and there were people in the line who did not even have their ID out or know they need to take their computer out of their bag for screening. This is a great idea but I think people need to be made more aware of what line they are in. The expert line should move quickly and was the slowest line.

2. Since I travel so much and am female it is extremely annoying dealing with the liquid inconsistencies especially mascara and lip gloss. Most airports let it through but some catch it and make you separate it. If there could be a consistent message on this, that would be extremely helpful.

I hate having to go through my make up bag to pull out one lip gloss I easily forget is in there. Also, my bag is brought out to be checked a lot of times for having powder makeup. Sometimes, I am also told I can't have powder makeup or deoderant in my plastic bag for liquids. This sounds like a TSA training issue to me and consistency would make things a lot easier for frequent travelers, especially women.

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