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Inconsistencies, Part 2 (Commenting Disabled)

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Comments

Submitted by Laura911972 on

I am 35yr old white single parent who frequently flies with my 6yr old daughter. Why is it that in Detroit I can go through security with apple sauce and pudding for her snack without a problem but when I try to return home from Fort Meyer's I am pulled aside and treated like a criminal? I was even told that 2 apple sauces and 1 pudding were excessive, how is that when we have a 4 hour lay over in Atlanta. I was told that I should buy her something to eat in Atlanta. Gee, maybe I am on a budget because I am, let me say it again A SINGLE PARENT!! Why is apple sauce and pudding considered a liquid, is it not a food, along the same lines as, oh I don't know, baby food?? This whole time while I am trying to figure out why the rules are different here than they are in Michigan and while I am trying to reign in my temper my 6 yr old is crying and starting to have a fit because she knows that they are telling us we did something wrong. Later she askes why that lady was so mean, I replied that she was just trying to do her job, but inside I was just as confused as she was. Get it together TSA, americans are not the criminals.

Submitted by Anonymous on
Anonymous said...
Vendors have been vetted and have airport privledges. The companies that deliever the liquids, lotions, gels, and aerosols to be purchased in the sterile area are also cleared.

April 27, 2008 10:42 AM


So the vendor was vetted, so what?

What is to prevent an employee of that vendor from adding something to the shipment that is dangerous.

I was vetted for a Top Secret Sercuity Clearance, yet I must be checked each and every time I pass a TSA checkpoint. So does anyone else with simular backgrounds.

Your argument is invalid!
Submitted by Anonymous on

What is to prevent an employee of that vendor from adding something to the shipment that is dangerous.

I was vetted for a Top Secret Sercuity Clearance, yet I must be checked each and every time I pass a TSA checkpoint. So does anyone else with simular backgrounds.

Your argument is invalid

You may have a top secret security clearance but you don't have an airport badge at that particular airport.We TSO's are required to ensure that the vendors badges are valid. My argument isn't an argument its the reason why vendors are authorized to carry liquids to the sterile area.

Submitted by Karen Shaw on

My 87 yr. old disabled Father of Irish descent, who can barely walk at all, was asked to nearly undress in front of everyone. No one would help him undress, or get dressed back up (in front of everyone.)
The purpose of this is unclear, and abusive.
This doesn't help national security.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Someone needs to start profiling again.
I get stopped everytime for a complete search -- I'm red-haired, green eyed, 55, a female with arthritis.
The time wasted on me does not help anyone, least of all national security

Submitted by Anonymous on

We transfered planes in Chicago O'Hare, terminal 1, about 1:00 pm April 18 th this month. Since I have a hip replacement I was being checked out. I had taken shoes off as well as all the other requirements. As they were checking me, about 4 or 5 men slopply dressed jumped ahead of the line, didn't take off shoes and proceeded through the metal detector and proceeded on their way. Not one of the security personnel paid any attention to them. It was a direct violation of the rules that the rest of us had to apply with. Why didn't they get stopped? They appeared to be in gang type of dress. Were the security agents afraid to stop them? This line of security was one of the most strict that I have gone through. They were even going through the purse of a little old crippled lady with a cane, and then not even batting an eye of some hoods forcing their way through that would be a much greater threat.

Submitted by Anonymous on
Anonymous said...

We transfered planes in Chicago O'Hare, terminal 1, about 1:00 pm April 18 th this month. Since I have a hip replacement I was being checked out. I had taken shoes off as well as all the other requirements. As they were checking me, about 4 or 5 men slopply dressed jumped ahead of the line, didn't take off shoes and proceeded through the metal detector and proceeded on their way. Not one of the security personnel paid any attention to them. It was a direct violation of the rules that the rest of us had to apply with. Why didn't they get stopped? They appeared to be in gang type of dress. Were the security agents afraid to stop them? This line of security was one of the most strict that I have gone through. They were even going through the purse of a little old crippled lady with a cane, and then not even batting an eye of some hoods forcing their way through that would be a much greater threat.

April 28, 2008 3:40 PM

Those fellows with their shoes on might have been airport employees. I'm not sure but if they had valid airport badges and their shoes don't alarm they can keep them on.
Submitted by Anonymous on
You may have a top secret security clearance but you don't have an airport badge at that particular airport.

A few weeks back TSA found an airport worker in the ramp area with a handgun in their vehicle. I suppose since this person had an Airport Badge they were good to go?
Submitted by Anonymous on

A few weeks back TSA found an airport worker in the ramp area with a handgun in their vehicle. I suppose since this person had an Airport Badge they were good to go?

April 29, 2008 11:08 AM

No it's obviously not good to go. That is why we screen employees and vehicles on the ramp. Who knows if there was a nefarious purpose for the gun, but I'm glad that the TSA is doing their job and screening employees as well.
Submitted by Anonymous on

That is why we screen employees and vehicles on the ramp. Who knows if there was a nefarious purpose for the gun, but I'm glad that the TSA is doing their job and screening employees as well.

April 29, 2008 12:29 PM


The person and weapon was already past the checkpoint.

Good job at security? I think not!

Submitted by Anonymous on

Airline employees do not for the most part go through the checkpoints. When escorting passengers perhaps but they have other access to the sterile area. TSA is piloting 100% employee screening at some airports, and does do screening of employees other than through the checkpoints. That is how the employee with the gun was caught by the TSA.

Submitted by Casino Gambling on

Flying out of Detroit Metro,my wife and I were asked to remove our hooded sweatshirts. Good thing we had t-shirts on underneath. Secondly, has anyone ever seen a TSA official smile?

Submitted by HSVTSO Dean on
CasinoGambling wrote:

Flying out of Detroit Metro,my wife and I were asked to remove our hooded sweatshirts.

And rightly so. Though this does fall in line with something I've said in other threads, where various airports have their own methods for dealing with such things.

At my airport, for instance, having a hooded sweatshirt on when you enter into the walk-through means you get sent over for additional screening and patted down to ensure that you aren't hiding anything beneath it.

Some airports extend the requirement for coat and jacket removal to hooded sweatshirts, asking that they be removed.

Under the guidelines, both options are correct and it'd be up to the specific federal security directors of each airport to decide how to implement the procedures.

Good thing we had t-shirts on underneath.

If you did not, you wouldn't have had to take them off. At that point though, if the hooded sweatshirt were your only line of defense between you being clothed and you standing there in your skin, you likely would have been sent over for the same pat-down that I mentioned above. Since I don't work at Detroit Metro, I can't precisely say that they'd do, but given that I am a TSO I have a fairly good idea, given that everything we do is generally along the same lines.

Secondly, has anyone ever seen a TSA official smile?

Yes.
Submitted by TSA Supervisor on

There are a lot of valid complaints in this blog. I recognize the frustration. We are not as consistant as we should be as an organization.
Firstly just to clear up one of the most damaging concerns...TSA does not confiscate any items. We have items that are prohibited from going past the security checkpoints. You as the owner of the prohibited items are told that it is not permitted past and may be checked as baggage, given to someone who is not flying, or mailed. If you choose not to do any of those things we are willing to dispose of them for you. You may not like your options but you do have them. The exception to this is when the police and or FBI are involved, at that point the items may be confiscated and used as evidence against you. If you aren't carrying a gun or throwing star mace etc. you will likely never have an item confiscated.
Secondly none of our officers are permitted to keep any surrendered items even if the passenger offers them as a gift. The largest part of these items which are voluntarily surrendered, are liquids, pastes and gels, and go directly into garbage cans to be disposed of by a contracted cleaning service. The exceptions would be those items that are flamable, toxic or otherwise hazardous, and liquor.The disposition of hazardous materials is the resposibility of by upper management and I don't know the details. Liquor, wine, beer etc is poured down a drain with at least one witness. This is done to insure the cleaning company workers don't take it and drink it, at least that is my understanding. I do not know what happens to the knives and scissors once they have been collected. I have heard it is possible to reclaim voluntarily surrendered items but as it is not something handled locally by the airport I don't know anything about the process or even if it is true.
I agree with the person who mentioned the fact that diabetics are allowed to carry insulin and needles. There will always be a risk to life and safety as long as customer service is being taken into account and," even if they are not," ie. large men etc.. There will never be perfect 100% security. The idea behind TSA is to limit the threats as much as possible while attempting to keep a balance with customer service.
I know that no matter how much we are allowed to do what we want ,when Mom or Dad say, "no," we think they are the meanest most unfair parents who ever walked the earth. Of course when TSA has told you," No you can't take such and such through the checkpoint." and you didn't give yourself enough time to check it in as baggage, or it's too far to walk, or too much trouble, and your ride already left, you think," TSA is just mean!!!"
To the person who wrote that inconsistancy is a good thing...YOU ARE DEAD WRONG! We have standard operating proceedures and we are expected to abide by them. The inconsistancies are to our shame. It is very embarrassing when I have passengers telling me their knife came through several airports, officers looked at it, decided it was small enough, and let it go. I only hope they are lying to try to persuade me to allow it past, which I can not do because no knives are allowed!!
In closing I'd just like to ad a reminder. We are not mean, as a rule, I realize we do have some people working for us that are. When we disallow something it is either because we are required to or through our interpretation of our proceedures, they are sometimes less clear than others, believe we are required to disallow said item. There is always an alternative to giving up your property. If you are not sure it is allowed send it by mail or in checked baggage, have your ride wait until you call and tell them you are okay. We really want you to make your flight without ever having to see us, the supervisors, that is.

Submitted by Anonymous on

hsvtso said: "At my airport, for instance, having a hooded sweatshirt on when you enter into the walk-through means you get sent over for additional screening and patted down to ensure that you aren't hiding anything beneath it."

Dear blog team,

I never saw any TSA recommendation to avoid hooded sweatshirts in airports apart from on this blog. I certainly did not know that wearing them, or "clothes that do not show the outline of your body", as stated by another TSA blogger, made me an additional screening candidate. Could you please put an explanation regarding this point on the TSA site? I think we deserve to be warned that wearing tight clothes can help us avoid secondary screening.

Submitted by Anonymous on

TSA Supervisor said: "The idea behind TSA is to limit the threats as much as possible while attempting to keep a balance with customer service."

Sorry TSA, from a quick look through this blog, the balance with customer service has long been lost...

Submitted by Sherry on

I was stopped at ORD airport by a TSA agent before I even entered the security line. She told me I could only have two carry-on items and I would need to consolidate my bags. I was carrying one small messenger bag, one laptop in a case, and one rolling bag. I am aware of the 2 item rule, and was prepared to put my laptop inside my messenger bag once I got past security since I would have to have it out to go on the belt individually. I asked if I needed to have my laptop out to go through the line and she told me I did. I then continued to walk towards the line when she stopped me again. With a sharp, "Ma'am you NEED to consolidate your bags." Didn't we just go through this? I proceded to shove my laptop in my bag, walk five steps past her, then take it back out again to prepare to go through the security line. What's up with that?

Submitted by Anonymous on

Anonymous said...
"...I would really like to know what happens to all these items – even new, sealed products – that are “thrown out” by the TSOs. If you don’t believe me, then search in Google for “confiscated items” +airport. You will find numerous articles that show money is being made off these items – AT YOUR EXPENSE."

To whomever wrote this blog entry, at most airports it's the custodians who are making money off of your surrendered items. Most of the liquids are actaull "thrown in the trashcan" and taken out by the custodians. If they want to pilage through the trash, they can because it's considered "gargabe" after they take it off the check point. If you'd like to make a complaint about it, you should contact your local airport or the company that provides custodial services to that airport. Same goes for confiscated prohibited items (knives, tools, or other weapons) when it comes to disposal. A contracted company picks up the prohibited items for disposal. How they dispose of it is pretty much up to them once they take it off of airport property.

April 5, 2008 3:06 PM


for one... we throw them in the garbage. that garbage bag has so much thrown in it that if you seriously take something out of it to consume then thats your personal health. i NEVER ate or drank out the garbage and do not plan to. tsa DOES NOT take the trash out, there are airport workers. so if there is money to be made then you should look in their direction because if you look up while inside of a checkpoint there are TONS of cameras so there is no way a tso can go into the garbage pull something out and not be seen.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Anonymous said...
Anonymous said: "I've never had any of the problems with security that people have described, and it's for two very simple reasons: I check my luggage, and I travel light."

Dear Anonymous, I travel light too, typically a carry-on size suitcase that I do not carry on, but check in, plus a purse. I still get selected for super-security every single time I fly. I am a tiny white woman in my 30s. I have no clue why I am subject to "special treatment" in airport security, and there is nothing I can do about it

"Do you really NEED to carry your toothpaste with you?"

Yes I do. I typically travel internationally, in long overnight flights, involving connections that often take 24 h between checking in and seeing my luggage again. I couldn´t care less about makeup but need both toothpaste and deodorant, or you won´t have a very pleasant time sitting next to me on your next trip.

April 8, 2008 6:38 AM


there are plenty of grocery stores and store aids (rite aid, duane reade, cvs pharmacy) that have TRAVEL SIZED products. you just have to ask for them. they have very small toothpaste, deodorant and shaving cream bottles. JUST ASK.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Anonymous said...
On 4/7/08 I went thru security at RDU. The short,young TSO man looked at my MI drivers license, made some comment about Penn State that I didn't get. When he mentioned something else about Penn State I said "I don't know about that." He proceeded to tell me that maybe I was asking for a body cavity search. I was so shocked that I said nothing more and didn't think to get his name or badge ID #. This is totally unacceptable and I hope to be able to contact the TSA at RDU to make a formal complaint. Talk about unchecked and inappropriate powers.

April 9, 2008 2:09 PM

indeed it is unacceptable but....you didnt say anything either. so how can such behavior be stopped ?

Submitted by Anonymous on

Anonymous said...
""Inconsistencies" Is what it takes to catch the bad guys! If every airport was the same then the average traveler would find loop holes through TSA checkpoints, and if the average traveler can seek out loop holes imagine what a terrorist can find. Don't forget TSA is not the only one watching you go through the airport, so are the terrorist. Its your option to fly, take the Gray Hound if you don't feel safe!

April 9, 2008 12:44 PM"

So the terrorist is standing around watching you? Laughing, perhaps? Maybe he will invite you for a drink and chat you up.... Try not to be a security risk in the unlikely event that this occurs.

April 9, 2008 6:11 PM

as crazy as it may seem in some aspect he is right. you are so into getting into security that you are probably unaware of what goes on around you. you ever see those "MEN IN BLACK" people standing outside the checkpoint ? most of them are private owned limo drivers waiting to pick someone up. ever notice how some...may focus attention more on the checkpoint than the exit lane in which passengers are leaving security to get their bags ? that the very same person whose name is on the piece of paper may have walked by them because they arent looking ? i have also witnessed (now im not really stereotypical) but i seen 4 guys who... in some eyes may fit the description of possible terrorists. gather around and talk and when approaching the line began to separate and i mean go into individual lines waay far apart from each other and then when done gather again and chat. now if that is the norm for you then you are naive but... tsa manage to pull them aside and question one passenger why he had luggage of only STACKS OF BOOKS in his bag and nothing more. no clothes, no shoes, no toiletry kit...nothing. but books. like i said if that is the norm to you then hey...be naive and believe what you want.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Anonymous said...
I am a diabetic who wears an insulin pump. When going to the airport I never know if security is going to treat me like a criminal or a normal person because I am wearing an insulin pump. I have now gotten to the point of before I go to the security area I stop off at a bathroom hide the insulin pump where the sun doesn't shine and walk back out and go through security. So far this has worked, but it makes me wonder how many other people are hiding things like I am. Is security really doing anything? or is it just making people like me really good at sneaking things in?

April 10, 2008 1:16 PM


if you want your insulin pump smelling like... your private parts just to prove a point, then thats on you. its really not that serious. and your pump probably doesnt have enough metal to alarm it. and if it did you would go through additional screening in which when they wand you and hear the alarm go off in your private area they will call for a supervisor to assist and when you finally say its my insulin pump thats when they call for extra help because now then this sounds a bit insane and abnormal. in which they might call over police to study your patterns and make sure you are sane.... now... do you want all that attention just for a pump ???

Submitted by Anonymous on

Matt said...
In several recent trips i had several inconsistencies that really make no sense. I travel 60% of every month, and have a nice routine when going through security. Ever since the 3-1-1 was put into place i have been carrying my 1 Quart size bag. But time and time again i see folks with 2 or 3, or even 1 gallon bags go right through security with no issues. Then again in Charlotte, i was preparing to go through the checkpoint and i always place my laptop and my liquids in 1 bin to reduce the number of bins. The laptop is small and the liquids are not on top of the laptop, i was told they must be separated. Never before was that the case, so i had to get another bin. Then 3 days later in Louisville i put my laptop and liquids together and everything was fine. Why? The last one is the kicker, i was just coming home from Newark, and watched an employee going through security with a cart full of water and soda. Why is ok for them to put there liquids in the radar scanner but our liquids are not acceptable? You don't think once those liquids go through they cannot be given to someone of interest. Come on? Remember those are the same liquids we are allowed to purchase to bring on to aircrafts.

April 27, 2008 9:05 AM


ummm thats probably because he/she is not flying therefore does not pose a threat

Submitted by Anonymous on

Anonymous said...
Anonymous said...
Vendors have been vetted and have airport privledges. The companies that deliever the liquids, lotions, gels, and aerosols to be purchased in the sterile area are also cleared.

April 27, 2008 10:42 AM


So the vendor was vetted, so what?

What is to prevent an employee of that vendor from adding something to the shipment that is dangerous.

I was vetted for a Top Secret Sercuity Clearance, yet I must be checked each and every time I pass a TSA checkpoint. So does anyone else with simular backgrounds.

Your argument is invalid!

April 27, 2008 11:47 AM


if that employee/employer does in fact do that, then now you have a name and face to go with it and prosecution will come.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Anonymous said...
You may have a top secret security clearance but you don't have an airport badge at that particular airport.

A few weeks back TSA found an airport worker in the ramp area with a handgun in their vehicle. I suppose since this person had an Airport Badge they were good to go?

April 29, 2008 11:08 AM


no im sure they were fired then slapped with a felony fine and had to go to court to pay that wonderful 4 digit fine

Submitted by Anonymous on

Anonymous said...
That is why we screen employees and vehicles on the ramp. Who knows if there was a nefarious purpose for the gun, but I'm glad that the TSA is doing their job and screening employees as well.

April 29, 2008 12:29 PM


The person and weapon was already past the checkpoint.

Good job at security? I think not!

April 29, 2008 2:13 PM


for one.. not EVERY employee has to go through security. there are other access points in the airport for employees who do not need to go through security to report to work. THUS the person got caught. so why the sarcasm ?? passengers definitely cannot go where that employee went because the alarm would go off instantly.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Anonymous said...
hsvtso said: "At my airport, for instance, having a hooded sweatshirt on when you enter into the walk-through means you get sent over for additional screening and patted down to ensure that you aren't hiding anything beneath it."

Dear blog team,

I never saw any TSA recommendation to avoid hooded sweatshirts in airports apart from on this blog. I certainly did not know that wearing them, or "clothes that do not show the outline of your body", as stated by another TSA blogger, made me an additional screening candidate. Could you please put an explanation regarding this point on the TSA site? I think we deserve to be warned that wearing tight clothes can help us avoid secondary screening.

May 1, 2008 6:07 PM


wouldnt recommending passengers not to wear hooded sweatshirts result in tsa doing too much ??

Submitted by Anonymous on

Anonymous said...
TSA Supervisor said: "The idea behind TSA is to limit the threats as much as possible while attempting to keep a balance with customer service."

Sorry TSA, from a quick look through this blog, the balance with customer service has long been lost...

May 1, 2008 6:20 PM


thats on the checkpoint. customer service on a blog ?? what exactly are you buying ? what product or service is tsa selling on this blog ?

Submitted by Anonymous on

I am quite amazed that the new "black diamond lane" procedure, which was instituted mere weeks ago, has already given rise to the myth that it's for frequent flyers, 1st class passengers, and those with elite status with the airlines.

No, it's for people who are experienced with the security process, or have no carry-ons, etc., i.e., people who can get through the line quickly.

Admittedly, these two groups overlap significantly, but they are not the same! The gatekeepers for these "black diamond" lanes need to be informed of the difference.

Submitted by Snuggle Comfort on

People are known to take only the bits and pieces of what they hear, such as 3 ounces but then they don't hear about the baggy. An even finer example is when back in august of 2007 a newspaper article was posted noting how disposable cigarette lighters were now allowed and within a day everyone believes they can bring lighters now, but then they get up to the checkpoint and find out that its not allowed until september 5th or 6th for instance. This is a major inconsistancy. I recommend training your officers first about this then establishing a set date to allow them and finally notifying newspaper and the media.
I'm sure this caused many angry individuals to complain about this across the country when this happened. I recommend learning from this mistake and not letting it happen again, "fool me once shame on you, fool me twice shame on me!".

Submitted by Anonymous on
for one.. not EVERY employee has to go through security. there are other access points in the airport for employees who do not need to go through security to report to work. THUS the person got caught. so why the sarcasm ??

Not sarcasm, the person with the weapon had passed a checkpoint controlled by contract security. TSA's supervision of the contract security was inadequate to ensure that no contraband made its way to the secured area. The person was on the aircraft ramp area, so I suspect this is a controlled area.

Had this person brought a bomb on he could have placed it on an aircraft or into a passengers checked baggage after it had been cleared.

Additionally, it proves the point that access to the ramp areas is not secure and is the most likely means of introducing contraband.

TSA is busy confiscating water and such and has a severe security whole that remains unplugged.

Hey, if your ok with that then so am I. I'm willing to take my chances that the next attack will not be via aviation.
Submitted by D Brooks on

I originally posted this comment (on 4/15); I just wanted to come back and put my name on it. It's the same as before (just re-posted), I figure this would make it easier to keep track of what I say or in this case, have already said, and responses to it. Whether it's on the page or another one.

by D.Brooks...(Originally posted 4/15/08 under Anonymous)

I have read most of the comments on how TSA is horrible with bad attitudes and not doing their job. I agree that from airport to airport our procedures are inconsitent. That is not because it's written that way, it's because the individuals at that particular airport are interpreting the procedures in their own manner and applying them as such, so complaints should be made directly to that airport and the TSA management their and not to TSA as a whole because most of us are doing our job to the guidelines that we are given. We do not come to your jobs and ask you to bend the rules for us, so we would appreciate if you would provide us with the same courtesy. Everyday we have people come in saying "i didn't know" and "well when did this start" and blah blah blah. Same nonsense, different day. If the people from Japan know the rules and the people from Germany know the rules, then there is no reason that the people from Ohio, or Kentucky or some of these other places don't know. Stop the lies people. The liquid ban has been going on for over a year, so to come in a say you didn't know or this must be new is ridiculous. Too many people come in begging to get things through they know they shouldn't have, and when you make an expection for them, these same people are the ones telling everyone we aren't doing our job because we let them through with something they shouldn't have. Stop testing us and just follow the rules. 3.4 oz!! Not a brand new 2 liter bottle of soda, not your 12 oz bottle of suntan lotion or you 8 oz perfume. The reason you come across screeners with bad attitudes or a no nonsense mentality is because we get tired of some passenger screaming at us that they didn't know the rules, or trying to sneak something in only to pretend they didn't know it was in their bag. After 8 hrs of the same B.S. your patience wears thin and you do become more rigid. Don't blame us, blame the clown in front of you for stuffing the 4 inch hunting knife in his kids bag and trying to pretend he didn't know it was their or the lady with a 2 liter soda holding up the line because she wants a ziploc back for it. These are real examples of the ignorance we deal with every few minutes.
Yes on the TSA website they have a few examples of items found and I can personally tell you that we have confiscated REAL guns, brass knuckles, and large knives not little belt buckles or lighters; so there are REAL threat items being taken daily and it's not an exaggeration or joke. If people stop trying to test us by bringing stuff in they shouldn't have, then we wouldn't have to waste as much time going through bags and checking people we don't need to. People always say " do I look like a terrorist?" Well since Jeffrey Dahmer didn't look like he ate little boys and Tim McVeigh didn't look like he was going to blow up the building in Oklahoma and since we don't know all of you personally, we can't really say if you are one or not, but we can say this.... If you don't want to be mistaken for a possible terrorist, then stop acting like one. Terrorists like to test security, beg to bring things they shouldn't, and try to sneak items in. We would love to not dig through your stuff if we don't have to, and you would love to pass through security without being stopped, so leave the extra stuff home and we can all have a better experience at the airport.
Thanks....

Submitted by Ceronomus on

Let's forget about things like shoes coming off at one airport and not another and talk about a MAJOR inconsistency.

Why are there six year old children, SKY MARSHALS, and heads of State such as NELSON MANDELA, on the do not fly list?

We're looking for terrorists right? We're trying to catch terrorists. Using a list of names is bound to cause inconsistencies and problems since it is so easy to get a fake ID in the first place.

So, while the TSA and the Department of Homeland Security prevent Sky Marshals from boarding the flights that they are to protect (because their name is similar to someone on the watch list), a person ON the watch list only needs a fake ID to breeze onto a plane.

THAT is inconsistent and that needs to be addressed. This "super secret" watch list that is growing exponentially will soon make it impossible for anyone to fly. Heck, a friend of mine was cavity searched while they asked him questions about the Russian mob.

So how about we go back to things that actually work? Prevention, WELL TRAINED screeners, and a little thing called common sense. Looking for a terrorist by name isn't going to accomplish much, they'll just keep using aliases while non-terrorists get refused access to their planes and, apparently, cavity searched.

Submitted by Anonymous on

To the diabetic pointing out that he's allowed to bring on medication which can be used to kill folks? Yup. And I can still walk onto a plane with enough explosives to bring it out of the sky.

And yet I have to pay $3 for a small bottle of water because I can't carry that on.

How about we end the Security Theater and concentrate on things that actually DO something?

Someone trying to bring on a hunting knife? X-Ray and metal detection catch that, arrest the idiot. Someone bringing on a liquid?

Technically speaking if ANYONE is allowed to bring on more than the prescribed amount of liquids, then it is "selective enforcement" and actually unconstitutional.

Don't get me wrong, common sense states that you let people bring on medication, however common sense (and numerous prominent scientists) has shown that no, the liquid explosive plot would not have worked.

Submitted by Anonymous on

To anonymous who posted on May 4: "wouldnt recommending passengers not to wear hooded sweatshirts result in tsa doing too much ??"

If the TSA is selecting persons in sweatshirts for additional screening, we should be warned about this beforehand, so we can avoid being singled out for this reason.

Of course, I totally agree that selecting a person for addition screening based on the fact that this person is wearing a hood, or the tightness of their clothes, is ridiculous in the first place.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Anonymous said...
for one.. not EVERY employee has to go through security. there are other access points in the airport for employees who do not need to go through security to report to work. THUS the person got caught. so why the sarcasm ??

Not sarcasm, the person with the weapon had passed a checkpoint controlled by contract security. TSA's supervision of the contract security was inadequate to ensure that no contraband made its way to the secured area. The person was on the aircraft ramp area, so I suspect this is a controlled area.

OK ONCE AGAIN BECAUSE IM STARTING TO BECOME ANNOYED. AIRPORT.. ARE YOU FOLLOWING ME ?? AIRPORT EMPLOYEES "DO NOT" HAVE TO GO THROUGH CHECKPOINTS. THERE ARE DOORS WITH ID SWIPES THAT THEY USE TO GO TO WORK. IT HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH THE CHECKPOINT BUT NOW TSA NOT ONLY CHECKS AIRPORT EMPLOYEES BUT THEY ARE ALSO CHECKING PLANES BEFORE FLIGHT CREW AND PASSENGERS BOARD. CONTRACT SECURITY ?? AIRPORT EMPLOYEES SWIPE THEIR ID TO GAIN ACCESS INTO THAT AREA. WHAT SECURITY ARE YOU TALKING ABOUT ?? YOU HAVE BEEN SERIOUSLY MISINFORMED.

Had this person brought a bomb on he could have placed it on an aircraft or into a passengers checked baggage after it had been cleared.

Additionally, it proves the point that access to the ramp areas is not secure and is the most likely means of introducing contraband.

TSA is busy confiscating water and such and has a severe security whole that remains unplugged.

Hey, if your ok with that then so am I. I'm willing to take my chances that the next attack will not be via aviation.

May 5, 2008 10:40 AM

IF THE NEXT ATTACK ISNT WITH AVIATION THEN THATS NOT MY CONCERN AS I COULDNT DO ANYTHING TO PREVENT IT

Submitted by Helena on

My beef? I have to transport a medication that needs to be kept cool at all times. The manufacturer has suggested that I use a long thermos with ice to transport the Byetta medication. TSA also suggest that I keep my original prescriptions with my medications. This has led me to attach my prescription to the outside of my thermos.
I have been to 10 different airports in the past year and have had to go through 10 different screenings on my thermos. Thank god I carry documentation and my glucometer at all times to show I am diabetic! I feel the TSA needs to better address a diabetics issue of transporting their medications and that all TSA agents perform the same screening. This inconsistency is very irritating as I am a road warrior who never knows if I am going to be pulled aside on an item the TSA says I can transport.

Helena S.

Submitted by Anonymous on

re:OK ONCE AGAIN BECAUSE IM STARTING TO BECOME ANNOYED. AIRPORT.. ARE YOU FOLLOWING ME ??

.........................

I don't give a Rats Rearend if your getting annoyed.

Airport..Are you following me.

A person had a weapon on the ramp area of a supposedly secure area.

TSA is tasked to make sure that Civil Aviation is safe.

TSA failed, plan and simple.

If your not checking everyone entering the operations area then there is no reason to check anyone.

TSA=Theater

Not Security!

Submitted by Anonymous on

Back on the subject of wearing hooded sweatshirts and getting pulled aside for additional screening. Why is a hooded sweatshirt considered any different than a regular sweatshirt? Is it the hood or the zipper that intimidates the TSA?

Submitted by Anonymous on

Most hooded sweatshirts and sweatshirts of any type are rather bulky and items of interest could possibly be hidden. Does that mean every person getting a patdown has something hidden? Obviously not. Does that mean every person coming through with a hooded or bulky sweatshirt will get extra screening? Obviously not. But patting down someone wearing skin tight clothing in which nothing could possibly be hidden underneath really doesn't make much sense, so it's better to pick someone with bulky clothing on.

It's semi-random but using some common sense which we and our procedures are consistently attacked for not being routinely used.

Submitted by Shawn on

At the Ontario, California airport on Thursday, May 1 at 6pm, a young female TSA agent checking my ID and boarding pass asked why I had removed the receipt from my boarding pass (it's perforated). I explained that the receipt is not the boarding pass...it's my receipt for my personal records and not required for anything. (The Southwest boarding passes generated at the kiosk have a small perforated receipt). Well, the fact that it was detached threw her into a tizzy. Even though she had my boarding pass and ID (and the detached receipt that I retrieved from my wallet), she had to call other TSA agents over, get approvals, holding up the line, etc. (the boarding passes printed at home don't have receipts, so what's the big deal?). So I was "tagged" for the full body search, inquiry, etc. upstairs at the X-ray area, just because this TSA agent didn't know the rules.

Submitted by Anonymous on

I went to Mexico City, and they would not LET you go through the metal detector without your shoes on. Most people were taking their shoes off and going through the detector since we were from the US and that's the way we are used to doing it. But they kept stopping us and telling us to go back, put our shoes back on, and go through again.

Submitted by Carbon Freeze on

Probably the best side-effect of the TSA's ramp-up following 9/11 was the sudden change from terse, unhelpful, discourteous, unknowledgeable agents to human, effective, courteous, knowledgeable ones. I found this remarkable at the time, but since then the pendulum has slowly and inconsistently drifted back in the other direction. Are we simply no longer engaging in the excellent training program that those initial post-9/11 employees obviously undertook? Or is it rather that we are no longer willing to offer the salaries that we did immediately after 9/11?
In either case, we travelers deserve to be treated as humans, and if the only way to do that is to spend more on salaries and/or training, I say do it.
Even better: Offer, at the cost of $1, a security line where the traveler is guaranteed to be served by one of these better-trained employees. Compared to $300 and $400 airfares, it'll feel like a drop in the bucket!

Submitted by Anonymous on

I am having difficulty with one inconsistency at airports that can easily be handled. Why am I allowed to use a luggage cart in all airports except Orlando, Newark and a couple of others (that I am having trouble remembering.) Recently, I challenged TSA at one airport and they reversed this rule.

I am getting older and cannot lug my laptop and one other small bag any more, but I am forced to do so at a few airports that don't allow the carts. It sure would be helpful if this rule could be made consistent or to at least have additional carts on the other side of security.

Aside from losing the $3.00 paid for the cart with no indication that it will not be allowed through security, it is often a very long walk to my gate, especially in Newark, NJ.

One possible soultion, Pay the $3.00 for the cart, leave it at the front of security and get a token for another one on the other side where you could have "cehcked" carts ready to go.

Anyone else feel this would be helpful?

Submitted by Alexander on

I have two things, and for at least the first comment, I would like a responce.
My first comment is that very recently, my son was flying from miami to pittsburgh with his grandfather. First of all, they were both asked to show ID, in SPANISH. It is a good thing that my son spoke fluent spanish, because the tso did not speak english, and my father wouldn't have known what to do. My son is only 13, and he was asked for ID, and he had to correct 3 tso's (remember, they only spoke spanish) and was subject to additional screening because he didn't have an id on him. You should make shure the rule that anyone younger than 18 doesn't need an id is enforced, and that an international airport inside the U.S. should have some ENGLISH speaking tso's.

secondly, an easy to impliment suggestion. Many people would like more time before security to be able to take off their shoes, take things out of their bags, or to do other things. My other son has braces that he uses to help him walk, and they are difficult to take off, and I would also like this more room. I know that in many airports lengthing the checkpoint is not feasable, but what you could do is in one or two lines, across from the tables leading up to the x-rays, have some chairs that could be used. This would provide the same effect as lengthening the area before the x-rays, but in a more compact version.

Submitted by Anonymous on

I want to thank the TSA employees for what they do for this country. We the American people have no idea the risk that you take on a daily basis. Please if you are an employee and you read this blog at all- which I recommend that you do not read it. Remember that you are dealing with people that already have anxiety because they are flying- We live in a country of whiners- that have completely forgotten what the concept of "liberty" and perfect union really mean anymore. I fly all the time. I put all my liquids in a bag. I take off my shoes because duh thats the rules. I can appreciate the rules changing because the threat changes. Thank you for all that you do and the changes that you are constantly making. My opinion is that TSA is doing its job- we have not had a hijacking or plane explosion since 9/11/2001. That is almost 7 years. I wish that the TSA had more authority like a police officer- maybe fine people for trying to break the rules. I think that if they did people would take them more seriously and that it would eliminate the whining. However, we do live in a great country where everyone has the right to whine.- and we all have to listen to them...God Bless America!!!

Submitted by Karen on

I frequently travel with a laptop. Depending on which airport I'm at i can either place the laptop in a bin with its protective sleeve and my ziploc of liquids or I'm rudely informed that the laptop must be in a bin by itself. Which is it?

Submitted by Carbon Freeze on

Regarding the above comment on luggage carts -- YES! Your solution of a token/exchange setup is perfect, and should be easy enough to implement, if airports actually cared about the passenger experience. However, since they don't, here's an even more radical idea: FREE CARTS. Free carts in the ticketing area, free carts beyond security, free carts in the baggage area. This is the way it's done all over Europe, where having to pay to rent a cart for 5 minutes sounds unthinkable and appalling. So come on, America, we can do better.

Submitted by Alexander on

First of all, adding to the cart topic, it really isn't under the tsa athority, it would be good to have free carts AFTER security. This way, there would be no risk of loseing them. Second of all, I have a comment/suggestion. It would be very easy to gain access to the secure section of the airport by terrorists, by using online check in, while we law-abiding, non terrorists, can't. If it is so easy for a terrorist to get by the security checkpoint by just using a fake boarding pass, why are we not allowed to go to see our family off. Along with that, the ability to electronically check in without seeing an agent, and the fact that you do not need an ID to board a flight, this first of all, renders the no-fly list usless, and second of all, can alow someone to fly on someone elses name. By reinstating the ID check at the gate, and letting non-flyers into the secure zone (and maybe adding a security tax of 1-2 dollars to do so), the process will become safer (as ID's would be checked at the gate, and there would be more people to notice suspicious behavior in a 9/11 concous public), and fares would be lowered (as airports would charge less of a tax, as there would be more people to buy in their shops). The only change to the pre 9/11 system that would have to be made would be that people without boarding passes would only be able to bring through security one small personal item, and NO liquids (this would be less of a hassle for them, as they would be able to go and return those items to their cars, and there would be less prohibited items through the checkpoint for this same reason) For some airports (most notibly large ones like JFK), during peak times, this may be an issue, so it should be at the airport's discression. To impliment this, at smaller airports non-passengers could go through the regular line, but at medium-large airports, a one lane "well-wishers" lane could set up, and priority given to passengers.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Anonymous said...
re:OK ONCE AGAIN BECAUSE IM STARTING TO BECOME ANNOYED. AIRPORT.. ARE YOU FOLLOWING ME ??

.........................

I don't give a Rats Rearend if your getting annoyed.

Airport..Are you following me.

A person had a weapon on the ramp area of a supposedly secure area.

TSA is tasked to make sure that Civil Aviation is safe.

TSA failed, plan and simple.

If your not checking everyone entering the operations area then there is no reason to check anyone.

TSA=Theater

Not Security!

May 7, 2008 4:47 PM

to this hard of hearing/seeing person. if tsa is on the checkpoint and an employee gets through to the ramp with a weapon. how exactly is that tsa's fault? that person only has to swipe his badge to get through downstairs. airport employees have the benefit of going wherever they please as they are granted permission with the issue of their badge. im not understanding at all how that is tsa's fault though.

the only other option would be to screen everyone at the same time at the same checkpoint but keeping in mind the thousand of employees PLUS the hundreds of employees who all clock in for work at the same time. means they would bump passengers ALL THE WAY to the back. but then again you would just come back here and complain about being bumped by airport employees causing you to miss your plane

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