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Wow! What a Response (Commenting Disabled)

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Thursday, January 31, 2008

Wow! The number of comments on our blog has been amazing. Many of the posts during the last 24 hours are exactly the types of questions we hope to answer and the conversations we hope to begin with the traveling public. Some have been downright mean and cranky but that’s okay too. For most people, this is the first chance to reach out directly to TSA and tell us about your experiences and we very much want to hear from you.

Frankly we’ve been overwhelmed with the number of response we’ve received, more than 700 comments at last count, and comments are still pouring in. Several of you have suggested a format change to go from a laundry list of: shoes, cranky officers, idiotic rules, you guys sure try hard…, stream of consciousness diatribes to a more logical way of collecting and hopefully shedding light on many of the things that passengers want to know.

Well we’ve heard the comments and we’re making the move. Later this afternoon you will find several common questions or topic areas that have been raised and are on the front of all our minds like shoes, ID requirements, liquids an others. This list will evolve as this blog does and we’ll be posting answers, thoughts and comments on each of these topics on these pages.

Because of the software we’re using to run this blog, it’s up to you to post your comment on the right page, in the correct topic. Today we don’t have any way to move posts from one place to another so we’re relying on you to post in the right place. If it’s not posted under the right topic we will not be able to move the post. Because we have more than 700 comments on the Welcome post, we are closing the comment feature there. Even though that post is not longer accepting comments, we still welcome your feedback and thoughts here.

In the spirit of transparency, we plan to note how many comments we've rejected and tell you why. Mostly the rejected comments include profane language, political rants or abusive posts that we just can't print, and some are completely off topic. Other than these, every post will go up as written and we will continue to operate this way.

Thanks again for the great range of insightful, sad, humorous, outrageous comments. Keep them coming and we’ll do our best to try to keep up.

Evolution Blog Team


electronics in flight said...
electronics in flight said...can someone please explain to me all the fuss about having all of your electronics OFF before we leave the gate?

A good question. Actually it was found that cell phone signals, specifically those in the 800-900 MHz range, did interfere with unshielded cockpit instrumentation. Because older aircraft with unshielded wiring can be affected, because of the possible problems that may arise by having many airborne cell phones "seeing" multiple cell phone towers, and because of all the electronic systems in a modern airplane that would have to undergo lengthy and expensive certification, the FCC (via enforcement through the FAA) still deems it best to stay on the safe side and prohibit the use of cell phones while airborne. It should be noted, though, that such a prohibition is being lifted in Europe.And while I'd like to take credit for that rant...all credit goes to The Mythbusters (with a little help from Wikipedia ).

Jay


How about Booties?
In response to anonymous who would like booties for their feet…
I understand your concern on the hygiene issue. While part of TSA’s mission is to promote great customer service the reality is that customer service in aviation is a partnership between the airport authority, the TSA, and the airlines. While I speak only for my airports most of them do in fact provide some type of ‘booty’ to passengers as a customer service enhancement. Those who don’t provide footwear ensure the cleaning crew cleans those floors regularly.
My recommendation is to start with your airport and explain your concern to them…the same could be said about having plastic baggies at the checkpoint for folks who forget to bring them to the airport. The airports also care about customer service and sometimes a gentle reminder goes a long way…

Jay

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Comments

Submitted by Anonymous on

Someone from TSA needs to explain why every person in a wheelchair is treated like the greatest threat to national security in our history. Every time I see an old man or woman degraded by TSA's prison work release program employees, it makes me want to leave the US and never look back.

Submitted by Atlanta on

What kind of training do the security folk in airports across the country get? And, are they full-time federal employees or do they come from private companies hired by the government? Thank you.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Amen Pair-a-docs!! Amen! You make a lot of sense.

Submitted by Anonymous on

In response to pair-a-docs:

You said the following:
"What you may not realize, however, is that the screening of your baggage takes place under the watchful eye of security cameras. Once the baggage is screened, it leaves our hands and goes to the airline baggage handlers, whose job is not conducted under the watchful eye of security cameras. We have your bag for a matter of moments before our job with it is done. It can be a matter of hours, however, before your bag is loaded onto the airplane. Think about it."

While what you said is certainly true, this defense ignores the main issue-- It is TSA that requires the bags to be unlocked, and thus makes them vulnerable to thieves!! I'm not concerned if the bag sits for hours somewhere if I know it's locked. Bag theft is primarily a crime of opportunity, and a locked bag (even with a zip-tie) is less vulnerable than an unlocked one. And if the answer is to use "Travel Sentry" locks, I can't tell you how many of those I've had cut off or missing, so that's not a solution.

If TSA has to open the bag, do so in the presence of the owner, and allow them to re-lock it when you're done. I don't want to hear about how that's hard/impractical/etc. Find a way; somehow every other country has been able to figure it out.

Oh, and by the way, if someone can steal something OUT of an unlocked bag, someone can also put something INTO one. Think about that. Apparently TSA doesn't.

Submitted by Scott on

Hey TSA -

I am a frequent business traveler (+/- 200k miles/yr). I must admit, at my darkest times I refer to your service as "Security Theater." Sorry 'bout that. I know you are all trying to do your work while dealing with the public, which is never fun.

This blog is a GREAT idea and makes the TSA more human. So far you've done a great job getting this out.

As long as you guys can remain consistent (a hooded sweatshirt is not a jacket, ice is not a liquid, etc) traveling will be much happier.

Take care, and good luck out there.

Scott

Submitted by Anonymous on

Seems like some people need more guidance getting through security (families, newbies, the elderly) and others are seasoned pros who don't want anything to slow them down.

Could we have two different kinds of lines, like a slow lane and a fast lane? People in the fast lane would be expected to hurry through, kind of like the express lane at a grocery store. Folks who need more help could go to the slow lane and not feel so stressed, because they would get a little more TLC.

Our needs are very different, so why not separate us?

Submitted by Anonymous on

Do you have any statistics about how effective your methods are? I'd like to see some numbers and percentages regarding how many people and/or items you have screened, detained, confiscated, etc., vs. how many actually were arrested, threatening, etc. Also, what is the rationale behind confiscating people's property without an option to return it to them, how does that differ from theft, and what legal recourse do passengers have in these situations?

Submitted by Anonymous on

Totally agree!!

"'If TSA has to open the bag, do so in the presence of the owner, and allow them to re-lock it when you're done. I don't want to hear about how that's hard/impractical/etc. Find a way; somehow every other country has been able to figure it out.

Oh, and by the way, if someone can steal something OUT of an unlocked bag, someone can also put something INTO one. Think about that. Apparently TSA doesn't."

Submitted by Anonymous on

The TSA is worthless, Air Travel has become inconvenient and slow. If you are lucky enough to fly a corporate or private jet (as I do on occasion), you wonder, "why the hell is there NO SECURITY, on private/corporate terminals?!?".. you literally have no checks, or security of ANY KIND!... TSA is complete waste.. it is a complete waste of time, and money.. END IT!

Submitted by Evan on

Wow Bob, it looks like we have a few things in common. I too was a musician in the past and got to see a lot of the US and Canada. Fun times! And would like to be a Behavior Detection Officer at some point (reading up on my Paul Ekman). But first I need to get hired on at my local airport. I have applied as a TSO and my application is “under consideration” right now. I just hope that if I get a job offer at some point, that they can accommodate a full time student’s schedule. Only able to work weekends I fell might prevent me from a job. But I hope not.

Anyway, my comment follows….

I just wanted to say that in these days of terrorist bombings, school shootings and serial killers, I am glad to have a staff of people who, lets face it, potently put there lives on the line every time they clock in for work, are in place doing there job the best they can to make sure we the traveling public make it to their destination in one piece, literally. Long lines, having to empty my pockets, put my skin lotion in a clear bag, opening up my laptop and taking off my shoes are all very very small inconveniences I am gladly willing to put up with to increase my chances of a incident free traveling experience.
I see that some people have expressed their opinion that the TSOs are missing a lot of stuff at the checkpoints. Well a few years ago a friend of ours passed away and we had to fly down the Southern California to deal with it, as my wife was the beneficiary of his Will. One of his items that I decided to keep was his Swiss Army knife. Well, on the way home going through security and having the knife and a heck of a lot of other stuff in a bag, I was asked to come with one of the TSOs to for a second search. Low and behold, they found the knife. Subsequently I had to turn it over to them but damn, I was glade and surprised that they could see it on the x-ray. So that proves to me that what ever they are doing at the checkpoints must be working. I say keep up the good work DHS.

Submitted by Anonymous on

The entire TSA is a joke! Why not just strip naked before you get on? Would be easier. This is all a result of our government keeping us all scared and to make it seem like the government wants to do something to protect us. If the terrorists are going to do something, they will find a way to get around all these silly security measures.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Contrary to Anonymous of February 1, 2008 11:56 AM, I believe that the whole point of communication is to get real answers as to policy. Not to get into the micromanagement of issues as they have arisen.

For policy to work two things have to happen. First you need good policy. Second you need the people at the top to put the screws into the people at the bottom to guarantee that policy is being implemented as it is set out. Failure of either means that the system is broken. A broken system would suggest that the top level needs to be replaced forthwith.

I assume that the goal of the TSA is to protect travelers physical safety as well as their dignity and personal space.

My personal pet peeve comes from the fact that every time my wife and I travel, the screeners pull her aside and grope her.

So how about providing some insight into how many employees have been let go for violation of policy. How many managers have been let go for covering their butts. And how many ex-screeners (I assume they are ex) have spent time in prison for sexual assault? I can't find any numbers, but given the widespread complaints it must be happening.

Unless it isn't, in which case, I'd like to know why.

Submitted by Avoid Flying on

This message is for Bob on the Blog Team.

You have censored 5 of 6 messages even though I am polite, have not used profane language, or any other so called offensive language.

What I have pointed out is,
TSA already has more data than they will ever need to pin point problems.

What TSA DOESN'T have is the guts to remedy the primary source of complaints, the rudeness and incompetence of their employees. And that is because they are unionized, thanks to politics, and almost impossible to remove.

My guess is Bob is a Union Representative and will continually censor any criticism of the TSA Union.

Submitted by McGaladon on

Wow back attcha! Have to admit I'm impressed that you all actually have this site, and are responsive, too! -- not just "talk". Yesterday, when I found this blog, it was grey print on ecru. Tasteful/serious, I guess was the thinking by some designer with 23-year-old eyes? Very hard to read. But just a few complaints about that, & today I see it is good ol' basic black-on-white!

Answers so far are good, too. May that only presage improvements in the other kind of terminals too!

Seems most of my own gripes & suggestions have been voiced many times already, + I have to admit that my absolute Worst security experience Ever was a few months *before* 9/11, by a contract worker, who would not possibly be hired by TSA today.

I just wish they'd pay you all better. It is so hard to stay focused on a repetitive, mundane task, even one as (arguably) crucial as TSA's. IMHO, that's worth more compensation than a fascinating job...if done well, of course.

Submitted by Anonymous on

In response to "pair-of-docs"

". . .Among the plethora of classes we're required to take, I believe it would be very worthwhile to both us and to you if we could get some good training regarding the differences between assertiveness and aggression. Sometimes it IS necessary for us to be assertive - but it's never permissible for any of us at any time to be aggressive."

To relate this to my own experience, I have been a part-time sports official for >15 years. My local organization includes some training on "conflict resolution and de-escalation" at pretty much every clinic we have. Why? Because it is important to our role to prevent minor disputes from escalating into major ones and to defuse potential conflicts as quickly as possible. Why does TSA not require "training regarding the differences between assertiveness and aggression"? Because that is not viewed as important by TSA management. There is another phrase that describes that attitude, "institutional arrogance". Frankly, most of the ills that TSA suffers stem from a culture of institutional arrogance.

"What you may not realize, however, is that the screening of your baggage takes place under the watchful eye of security cameras. Once the baggage is screened, it leaves our hands and goes to the airline baggage handlers, whose job is not conducted under the watchful eye of security cameras. We have your bag for a matter of moments before our job with it is done. It can be a matter of hours, however, before your bag is loaded onto the airplane."

Again, relating to my own experience as a business traveler who has flown fairly frequently since 1975. 1) From 1975 until the advent of TSA: nothing missing from a carry-on or checked bag. 2) From TSA to the present: one theft from checked baggage, one theft from carry-on, one theft attempt thwarted, one other possible attempt stopped. You asked us to "think about it". Given my experience to date, what should I be thinking?

Submitted by Anonymous on

Hello,

Just curious, but have you noticed the common thread among almost all the comments from the public - ie..that TSA screeners are rude, arrogant, and unhelpful. Why can't their attitude change? Why are they so ungodly hateful?

Submitted by Anonymous on

We're being prepared for the New World Order. One Constitutional right lost after another. "Papers please?"

Stop being sheep.

Let's see if this gets through.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Good Job TSA

Submitted by Anonymous on

Quoted:
"if the answer is to use "Travel Sentry" locks, I can't tell you how many of those I've had cut off or missing, so that's not a solution.

If TSA has to open the bag, do so in the presence of the owner, and allow them to re-lock it when you're done. I don't want to hear about how that's hard/impractical/etc. Find a way; somehow every other country has been able to figure it out."

As a TSAer I fully agree. If you have something in your bag that causes us to have to open it, we should put that bag aside, have you paged, make you come all the way back to the bag screening area, wait for you to find your lock keys, open your bag, screen it in front of you, reclose it, have you re-lock it and then go back through screening. Of course we know that you will make your flight because after all, you did come to the airport 4 hours before your flight, correct?

Oh and Travel Sentry locks... TSOs are supposed to have the master keys handy. Sometimes they can't be found. Sometimes the lowest bidder cheap crap keys break and take months to get replaced so they aren't there. In any case, if your TSA locks are cut you can bring them back to where you purchased them and they will be replaced free. Not many people realize that.

Anonymous said...
"what is the rationale behind confiscating people's property without an option to return it to them, how does that differ from theft, and what legal recourse do passengers have in these situations?"

No legal recourse. You gave up those rights when you submitted your bags for screening. Someday you should read ALL the fine print on your boarding pass jacket and on the airlines websites and on the TSA & FAA pages. Flying is a privelage NOT a right. When you submit yourself or your bags for screening you are giving up certain rights. Your recourse is not to fly.

Since you went to the TSA website and carefully checked that you didn't have any prohibited items in your bags, you shouldn't have anything to worry about. However, if you did have a prohibited item that we needed to remove, you have no option to get it back.

I've seen people pack gasoline, kerosene, stove fuel, bottles of rubbing alcohol which leaked all over the place, (God knows, none of this stuff is available where they are going.) Lbs and lbs of modeling clay which looked like explosives, expensive crystal with no padding, etc.

Submitted by Jordan on

Privatize airline security. When government controls it, we get a poor quality. This isn't a foreign concept... you know exactly what I'm talking about.

Submitted by Anonymous on

You guys gave me the shaft. I flew out of San Jose, CA to New York two years ago. The video camera with my honeymoon video footage was stolen right out of my bag while it was in YOUR HANDS. I called, and your TSA rep in San Jose told me she would not investigate, that you don't have any video survelance. So basically, one of your employees, who is supposed to be protecting me, ruined my honeymoon memories forever by stealing from me. And did nothing about it. Shame on you!

Submitted by Anonymous on

I'm not afraid of terrorists.

Submitted by Anonymous on

"So basically, one of your employees, who is supposed to be protecting me, ruined my honeymoon memories forever by stealing from me. And did nothing about it. Shame on you!"

It was for your own protection. Trust us, we know things you don't.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Wow, this is great! I've never seen another government agency so openly engage the public.

Submitted by Anonymous on

I just want to state that the comment about your "mother getting on the wrong" plane really is'nt TSA's job, that is the airlines doing.

Submitted by Anonymous on

For the guy whos mother got on the wrong plane...TSA does not have anything to do with which passenger gets on which plane. The scanning of boarding passes is done by the airline personnel. Airline personnel are suppose to check the passenger prior to boarding. I am glad your mother finally reached her destination safely.

Submitted by Anonymous on

It's a good thing that you guys confiscated my toenail clippers the other day - I mean, that could really have been dangerous! Who knows what I would have done with those things!

I hope that one day you'll figure out that when you treat people like inmates, that's exactly how they're going to behave.

Submitted by Anonymous on

From the inside looking out...

it's so easy for passengers to say, well maybe there should be no TSA, for you all with that type of mentality, I have a suggestion/question. Would you really feel safe flying on a COMMERCIAL airplane that was completely unsecured? That is that TSA would not check your checked bags, would not screen you, would never verify your identity would never touch you. What kind of flight do you think that would be? From the inside looking out, believe me, i WOULD NEVER PUT MYSELF INTO THAT SITUATION. I WILL ALWAYS be willing to go thru security, ALWAYS.
And regardless of what the agency might say, for TSO's our motto is Security first, Security always. We're serious about our jobs, and we will NOT LET IT HAPPEN ON OUR WATCH. So, i'm sorry to say, if that means inconviencing you to make sure that you're not carring a prohibited item, so be it.
Please, use this sight to educate yourselves and know what is going to happen before you get to the checkpoint/baggage screening area. And, don't worry, as long as I'm on duty, NOTHING will happen, you will get to where you're going safe and sound.

Submitted by Jack on
Keep up the smoke and mirrors, guys. I'm sure that when you "randomly select" those little old ladies and six year old kids for wanding and item-by-item searches, the next little old lady feels safer. I, however, watching more obvious targets (yes, profiling works, and you know it) walk right on through makes me feel like the TSA can't do the job it's been charged to do (because of political correctness?) and that none of us are any safer.

TSA has 'numbers' to meet and I suspect that in many cases they choose (with the help of the airlines) people that will be most compliant during the screening process. A little old lady or a toddler won't usually go off on them. I've sat within 20 feet of the screening line and seen the burqued up women and their male keepers walk right on through without being searched, while nuns, little old ladies, infants and toddlers get the 3rd degree treatment. TSA your 'random' searches aren't so random and we, the flying public are aware of your skewing the numbers to make people look good.
Submitted by Anonymous on

I just have a few things to say to those people who are complaining about the security measures such as having to take off your shoes or stand in long lines. IT'S FOR YOUR SAFETY! Anybody could suddenly decide that they want to blow up an airplane. Any normal looking person blending in with the croud could be mad at the world and want to do something evil! The TSA shouldn't decrease the security measures just because of some impatient and selfish people. They should improve it!

Submitted by Alex on

One of the goals of the 9/11 terrorists (and presumably terrorists everywhere), was to cause havok to the US economy, to cause the degradation of our civil rights, and to make air travel so inconvenient, embarrassing and just outright unpleasent that it would siphon billions from our economy.

Given this, how is the TSA combatting terrorism?

Submitted by Anonymous on

Response? Wait a few minutes when the Slashdot story hits. Then you'll get more response than you know what to do with. If your servers haven't screamed yet, they will be...

Submitted by Jack on
Oh and Travel Sentry locks... TSOs are supposed to have the master keys handy. Sometimes they can't be found. Sometimes the lowest bidder cheap crap keys break and take months to get replaced so they aren't there. In any case, if your TSA locks are cut you can bring them back to where you purchased them and they will be replaced free. Not many people realize that.

So just because someone pocketed the keys your becomes our problem? So what are we to do in the mean time? Baggage theives do exist and you just took secured bags and turned them into unsecured bags. Who becomes responsible for the security of those bags? Airlines? They point at TSA. TSA? They claim that the stolen objects never existed, you're lying about the theft, etc. I've had TSA cut the locks off of my tool chest even when I gave them my tool chest unlocked. I have never discovered who becomes responsible for the contents of my tool chest when they remove the locks and fail to resecure the chest.

I even talked with the president of the organization that deals with the specifications for the TSA approved locks and he said that the locks weren't intended to provide high security, and that the locks are fragile. Every time I talk with TSA about this issue I get the "use TSA approved locks and this wouldn't be an issue." Stop trying to spoon feed me used bull food and tell me that it is the food of the gods.

So what does it take to get your luggage from point A to point B with the contents intact?
Submitted by Jack on
I just have a few things to say to those people who are complaining about the security measures such as having to take off your shoes or stand in long lines. IT'S FOR YOUR SAFETY! Anybody could suddenly decide that they want to blow up an airplane. Any normal looking person blending in with the croud could be mad at the world and want to do something evil! The TSA shouldn't decrease the security measures just because of some impatient and selfish people. They should improve it!

You either don't travel much or you're a TSA hireling. Much of the security measures can be gotten around by a determined group/individual. Much of the security measures were designed to give the appearance of having security for the 'I flew ten years ago' crowd.
Submitted by Rev Randy on

We are frequently told the reason that liquids can't be taken on board is they might be hazardous or explosive. If that is the case why are these liquids discarded into open containers at security checkpoints and not treated like hazardous materials?

If in fact they are prohibited because they are deemed to be hazardous, isn't it contradictory to take these confiscated goods and donate them to homeless shelters or other aid agencies? If they are okay for the homeless then shouldn't they be okay for us?

To me it is hypocrisy to claim they are hazardous and take them away from us, but not treat them as hazardous. If they are, full hazmat procedures should be in place at EVERY checkpoint. If the liquids are not hazardous, then we needed to be able take them through security.

You can't have it both ways.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Hi! Please disband the TSA as it serves no purpose and makes us no safer than we were before! Thanks. Have a nice day.

Submitted by Ben FrantzDale on

Is this for real? This level of openness is exactly what the government needs. I'm astonished to see the TSA leading the way on this. Bravo!

Submitted by Anonymous on

I work for a large international science project, with groups from all around the world.

I have recently turned down an invitation to attend a conference in the US because of the amount of security theater we have to put up with to travel there.

Whenever the discussion comes round to where we will hold the next conference, a number of people have requested anywhere apart from the US.

We don't feel any safer as a result of the security theater, in fact we feel humiliated, irritated and scared.
Not scared of the terrorists, but scared of your personnel and what they might do. If I take a photo in the wrong part of the airport, will I get arrested. If I laugh, look happy, look nervous, behave oddly, have anything unusual in my luggage .... will I get taken aside and interrogated.

The whole process is set up to make it very clear, we are all suspects and are treated as such.

Submitted by Anonymous on

You may wish to fix your website of one annoying feature. If I click on a highlighted name to get a profile on the blog, etc, I get the page in Chinese. I do not speak, read or write Chinese and the page does not allow me to change the language. I spend a llot of time in China and I guess the blog software reads my location as China and selects Chinese language. It is a gee whizz feature that is a nonsense, it is silly. And it contributes to a lingering public impression that the TSA are basically idiots. Not useful, I suggest you change the feature.

Submitted by Anonymous on

I'm not afraid of the terrorists - I'm afraid of the random, capricious TSA officer who will detain me if I look at him funny, mutter anything under my breath, or have a ziploc baggy with a comment on it...

Submitted by Anonymous on

TSA employee should not be allowed to post here at all. They have the worst BAD security ever. The people who check the boarding passes are borderline illiterate. I absolutely hate everything about TSA. If I was in charge, you would be ALL out of job.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Dear TSA

Security of our airlines and our country is important. Until we know what happened on 9/11 we will have NO security in this country. You KNOW we have NO evidence of the so called "hijackers' boarding the so called "hijacked planes". Please show us the videos of the boarding of the four "hijacked" flights.

TIA

Submitted by Mike on

As a european I DO NOT feel welcome in the USA. I know for a fact that more people die in car accidents than in terrorist plots, so enough with that crap.

You might want to change the tagline of your site too, it's just scaring people. Do you want your customers to think they will have a pleasant 'experience' of should they think that on every trip they are risking their lives? It's up to you to make that difference.

To conclude my contribution to your new view on reality: USA is not a welcoming place, traveling on a plane is not cool. Change that and you'll have accomplished something.

Submitted by Anonymous on

I remember days after 911 and the travelling public was tolerant of added security and understood longer lines and increased scrutiny of luggage and carry ons.
The further we get from 911, the more people seem to forget that there are reasons why current policies are in place. When the TSA provides a public formum to provide feedback and ask questions, I find it disheartening to see people taking personal attacks on the TSA workers themselves...things like they work there 'cause they couldn't get a job at Walmart. That is not right and I hope that the folks monitoring these blogs consider that such personal attacks really shouldn't be posted. And no, I don't work for the TSA. Common sense,Common decency please. Let that guide these discussions please.

Submitted by Daniel Mick on

Thank you for a avenue for those you serve to express their (numerous) grievances. It's at least the first step toward desperately needed change.

Thank goodness I am a very infrequent flier. I am brimming with complaints about US airport security and I only encounter it a couple times a year! I want to make one just comment concerning this post (many other more flustered passengers can provide plenty of comments for the other posts):

First, it was mentioned that the number of deleted comments would be noted. Please do that as soon as possible. I would also ask that you outline precise guidelines for why they are banned. >>>>If the TSA some how doesn't realize it already, or has stubbornly been ignoring the issue, the fact that so many otherwise normal calm rational people are driven to cursed ranting should be a 'clue' to the TSA that their policies are unwelcome, and should be an amazing incentive for the TSA to review their efficacy and necessity.
People do not explode in anger because of logical, reasonable restrictions created for their safety. They welcome them! However, they do eventually lose it because of inane, pointless, contradictory control forced upon them. We are angry because we not only see no reason for the restrictions, we are provided none.

Show us WHY, for example "dangerous" liquids aren't allowed on a plane but can be dumped in giant barrels next to crowds of hundreds of people. Not a reference to 'studies', but the actual studies themselves.

We are highly informed with access to the world's knowledge through the internet. When every security professional on the internet not only dismisses TSA policies as ineffective but decries them as mere theatre and monstrous wastes of money and time that infuriate the masses, and the TSA continues to employ, we demand an explanation!

This blog has been overwhelmed with comments despite only being days old and only an infinitesimal fraction of the traveling population being aware of it. The number of comments, including raging rants, it has already attracted should have you racing to change things.

Thank you for at least listening. I hope to see change!

Submitted by Anonymous on

You all made slashdot so the traffic will now pour in which is good for visibility.

Now someone just needs to Digg this story to that front page.

Submitted by Mrs D To Be on

We're white, middle class, normal everyday Australians and we decided against the USA for our honeymoon, mainly because of the apparent goings on in the airport.

I dont want my memory of the first hours of my honeymoon to be wrecked by overzealous rent-a-cops, I don't want my stuff stolen, I don't want to be yelled at, I don't want to be groped or cavity searched.

I've wanted to go to the US my whole life (my parents were from there and I've never been), but between talking to people who have flown recently (which I do every day in my job), the news reports, the net reports etc, it's just too big a risk.

That's right - for tourists who want to have pleasant memories, the TSA makes visiting the US too risky.

We're going around Asia instead. That's about $15000 we're pumping into someone else's economy. Congratulations TSA.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Many travellers carry multiple luggage items and laptops. After you cross the metal detector, it is very stressful to grab stuff like shoes, laptop, coat/jacket, keys, coins, suitcases from different trays because there is little room on the belt/platform and then you have to grab everything without forgeting anything and then put the shoes on standing while others are rushing in. And also to remember to not drop boarding pass and driver's license while you are doing all this! Can this be improved?
Submitted by JL on

A short reply to mrs d to be who wrote:

We're white, middle class, normal everyday Australians and we decided against the USA for our honeymoon, mainly because of the apparent goings on in the airport.

I dont want my memory of the first hours of my honeymoon to be wrecked by overzealous rent-a-cops, I don't want my stuff stolen, I don't want to be yelled at, I don't want to be groped or cavity searched.

I've wanted to go to the US my whole life (my parents were from there and I've never been), but between talking to people who have flown recently (which I do every day in my job), the news reports, the net reports etc, it's just too big a risk.

That's right - for tourists who want to have pleasant memories, the TSA makes visiting the US too risky.

We're going around Asia instead. That's about $15000 we're pumping into someone else's economy. Congratulations TSA.

If you took the time to actually research what you "apparently" accepted as truth maybe you would see there are many flaws with what you stated in your post. Before you bash the TSA you should at least have had some kind of experience with them. It is so sad that you would give up your life long dream because of what someone else says, especially someone on the internet. It is also a shame that you would let the complaints of some form your opinions for you. If you actually had a bad experience then maybe I could understand but you are taking someone else's word as truth and then blaming the TSA for your decision. It seems like a knee jerk reaction and a lemming mentality. If you believe everything you read on the net, see on the news, and hear on the radio you must be quite naive. The TSA are not rent-a-cops, they are federal officers. The majority are not theives, but just like any other profession there are some bad apples. They really don't want to touch you, much less grope you, but they do have to touch passengers to perform their required duties. I guess it is a good thing for you to go somewhere else so you can think you are in a less risky environment, the TSA wouldn't want you to feel out of sorts here in the U.S. I hear Asia is very pleasant and seeing as they harbor terrorists in some areas I'm quite sure they will be glad to take your money. By the way when you get back to fairytale land say hi to Elvis, Bigfoot, and the space aliens from Area 51 for me, I heard on the internet they were moving into your neighborhood while you are gone.

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