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Some of the Hardest Working Dogs in the Nation

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Friday, March 14, 2008

So here we are in the year 2008, we have laptops as thin as a potato chip, cars that run on electricity or hydrogen and 400 channels of satellite TV beamed right to your living room…yet the best way we have to detect explosives in many environments is that 4-legged friend, the dog. That’s right, TSA uses all kinds of tools to ensure the safety of passengers; things like minivan-sized explosive detection systems How We Do What We Do: Baggage Screening , handheld liquid explosives scanners and many, many other devices but nothing out there today is as flexible or mobile as man’s best friend. None of these tools can search a plane in minutes or sniff a pallet of cargo without removing each individual box.

Today we announced that for the first time we will be training and deploying TSA employee-led canine teams to complement the 496 TSA trained and certified law enforcement teams stationed at 70 airports and 14 mass transit systems. These teams (one handler and one dog) go through the same exact training as our law enforcement teams but will focus on air cargo screening and be one part of our answer to screen all air cargo on passenger-carrying aircraft by August 2010. The handlers are all trained cargo security inspectors so they can cover both the explosive detection and screening side with their dog as well as making sure our partners are meeting their obligations from the regulatory side of the house.

Speaking of air cargo, some of you may not realize just how immense an operation it is to ship air cargo around the world. Commerce and customers have come to expect that millions of packages will fly around the world, arriving at their destination with amazing efficiency and accuracy. The volume is so large that, in addition to the cargo company’s trains, planes and automobiles, many packages often fly with your luggage in the belly of commercial passenger aircraft. Care packages sent to Billy in his dorm room or fruitcakes from your grandmother are sometimes stored below passenger’s feet, right next to suitcases. This is an important source of revenue for the airlines as well as a means for customers to get their packages on-time. Some less popular commercial flight routes survive solely as a result of the money brought in by transporting cargo.

Screening the large volume of cargo passing through the airports is a great challenge that TSA has been addressing since its inception. When the Baja Men so eloquently asked “Who Let the Dogs Out,” TSA answered the call by saying, “we did, we sir, let the dogs out.”

Since joining TSA in 2002 from the FAA, the expansion of the canine program has been huge but we are not stopping there. We plan to deploy 400 more specially trained bomb dogs in the next two years, 85 of which will be TSA teams (non-law enforcement teams) whose main duty will be to search cargo bound for passenger aircraft. The first 12 TSA teams graduated today and will be deployed in the coming months to Dulles International, John F. Kennedy International, Los Angeles International and Miami International Airports. So, by the end of 2009, we will have a force of about 800 bomb sniffing dogs from coast to coast.

While most of us are lucky if our family dog knows how to sit and stay, TSA’s specially trained dogs and handlers enhance the safety of the traveling public, one sniff at a time.

Make sure you read the canine article on the TSA web page.

Comments

Submitted by Milwaukee Web Design on

Are dobermann's really necessary? I hear some smaller dogs are just as adept at sniffing out certain substances and are much less intimidating to foreigners.
Milwaukee Web Design

Submitted by Anonymous on

Please use rescue dogs from shelters and pet rescue organizations.

I saw a demonstration of a Beagle by a TSO at the dog show in Boston in December. It was great PR, and the dog gave a great job! Currently there are almost 7000 Beagles/mixes of various ages on Petfinder.

Almost any member of the sporting dog group would be great at finding explosives or other contra-band. They are bred for hunting, flushing game and tracking. It is their job! Thats tens of thousands of various breeds that could be rescued and trained.

Submitted by Anonymous on

So it will have taken TSA NINE YEARS before it's at the point of screening all of the cargo on passenger planes?

So TSA does not screen all of the cargo currently loaded onto planes?

So TSA has decided that the risk of unscreened cargo has been an acceptable risk for nine yeas?

How on earth, then, do you sit there with straight faces and tell us that our shampoo is so dangerous we can't bring more than 3 ounces, or 3.4 ounces, or an unlabeled container of acceptable size, or whatever amount the TSO decides is acceptable that day, even though there's no such thing as a binary liquid explosive that could be used on a plane?

Why are the risks of unscreened cargo acceptable, and those of impossible liquid explosive fantasies dreamed up by a bunch of wannabe terrorists who didn't even have plane tickets, let alone a liquid binary explosive, not?

Submitted by Anonymous on

"Are dobermann's really necessary? I hear some smaller dogs are just as adept at sniffing out certain substances and are much less intimidating to foreigners."

The pictured dog is a German Shepherd, a member of the working group of dog breeds. They can be quite intimidating, especially if not trained properly. I'd be a little nervous about transporting them by air, or even getting them through security... Its not like you can just put them under the seat or in the overhead bin (really just kidding).

Submitted by Hawthorn on
"Are dobermann's really necessary? "

I suspect the answer is no, since the TSA website article shows a Golden Retriever and the blog posting shows a German Shepherd.
Submitted by Anonymous on

Any chance the TSA will ever scale BACK its operations? You'll have inspection of all cargo, inspection of all checked and carry-on luggage with both X-Ray and the clumsy hands of your careless staff (http://www.jeremyjohnstone.com/blog/archives/2008/03/12/united-states-re...), scrutiny of passenger facial expressions and mannerisms, surveillance and physical access controls up the wazoo, a ban on beverages, an assumption that the different is deadly, people walking through metal detectors in their socks, a staff trained to intimidate... at what point do you stop adding features? At what point are we "safe enough" ? I used to enjoy flying, now, thanks to your agency I dread it and avoid it.

When will you be satisfied?

(And don't you dare say "When it is 100% safe to fly" or "Never" because those are ridiculously stupid answers and you'd insult my intelligence) At some point there will be enough security. WHEN?

Submitted by Greg on

Use of dogs is better than most other topics here - it is highly effective, it doesn't interfere with the passengers, and offers the mobility necessary in transportation.

Wonder what direction the comments go?

Submitted by Trollkiller on

Great, now not only do we have to deal with broken locks and stuff stolen out of our baggage but dog drool too.

Sorry I just know that no matter what you do someone will have a gripe with it. So I just figured I would be the first.

Personally I would not mind sniffer dogs in the screening area too, as long as they are well behaved.

Submitted by Anonymous on

You can call the dog handlers CIE officers.

Hey Bob, dogs can "read" human behavior better than any BDO, or any human for that matter.

Also, dogs have thousands of years of human manipulation under their collars. Don't let them teach you their tricks.... If you have a dog you know what I mean: sitting next to the chewed up couch/ pillow/ book/ kid's toy and they look up at you with that cute expression: Who me?.

You don't have the same option, however.

So don't think anyone will believe you whet you foist off the mess you made of our checked luggage on "the
TSA explosives dog".

This does give us all an great opportunity to have our pets mark our check in luggage, to further the Canine Information Exchange.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Will these dogs growl if you try to get their badge number?

"Great, now not only do we have to deal with broken locks and stuff stolen out of our baggage but dog drool too."

There is now reliable DNA testing for canines. We'll just have to make sure these dogs get vetted and are in the DNA data base.

Submitted by Trollkiller on
Anonymous said...

This does give us all an great opportunity to have our pets mark our check in luggage, to further the Canine Information Exchange.

That is one of the funniest things I have read in a long time. Gave me a fantastic visual.

Officer: "what is it boy?"

Sniffer Dog: sniff "it is a three year old beagle" sniff "likes long walks on the beach" sniff "Meaty Bones treats" sniff "and being scratched behind the ears"
Submitted by Anonymous on

Chris,

I'm glad you take the time to answer blog comments, even though you guys tend to ignore the questions that are difficult, and tend to give non-answers (e.g It's a super duper TSA secret!) when the questions get tough.

I'd just like to know, when are the tough questions about beverages (possible bombs! oh no!) being thrown into big trash bins all mixed together and the questions about TSA's poor track record handing delicate equipment like camera lenses going to be answered?

Also, how much security is enough security?

Submitted by Trollkiller on

I have to back Christopher up on this. Almost immediately after 9/11 the cargo requirements were tightened up.

No longer could you just walk up to the cargo counter, place your package, pay and go. Now you have to be a Known Shipper, you have to manifest what is in the package and they can and will open the package and check it out. Screw it up a couple of times and you lose your Known Shipper status.

If you think TSOs are bad, try dealing with someone that went from being just a grunt at Delta to someone that can stop your package due to a spelling error.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Dogs! Man's best friend! Great!

Let me point out a few of the benefits:

I don't mind if they sniff my socks, but then I'm used to more than that.

They are usually nice to people (except if, at least in my dog's case, you even TRY to touch their pig ear).

Dogs don't care about money, but they do like a rewarding job. They are very focused and they don't mind risks.

My guess is the explosive sniffing dogs will probably need a higher security clearance than the average TSO. I think the average traveler can understand the reasoning behind this.

Border Collies are great at herding, so you could see a vast improvement in moving passengers through the security points. Find enough Border Collies, and you'll find the general security level at the airports will show remarkable improvement. Border Collies are very intelligent dogs, too bad that won't rub off those pesky TSO's. Just bring plenty of treats....

In fact from my point of view, get rid of most of the TSO's and just use dogs. Too bad they shed so much, so expect the airport cleaning bills to be higher, but that's about their only drawback, IMHO.

This is probably the best idea, maybe the only good idea that TSA has ever had. One good idea is all it really takes, though.

Submitted by Christopher on

Anonymous said at 12:46, "So it will have taken TSA NINE YEARS before it's at the point of screening all of the cargo on passenger planes?

So TSA does not screen all of the cargo currently loaded onto planes?

So TSA has decided that the risk of unscreened cargo has been an acceptable risk for nine years?"


Actually, today and for several years TSA has only allowed cargo from properly vetted shippers to even get on a passenger-carrying aircraft. Additionally, cargo at all small airports is screened, we screen all "high risk" cargo (destined for a specific flight or point to point) and a percentage of cargo is randomly screened. For more info on cargo screening, click here. Using these TSA teams to screen cargo is part of our plan to screen all cargo on passenger-carrying aircraft by August 2010.

Also, TSA purchases German Shepherds and Belgian Malanois from breeders and breeds our own Labrador Retrievers, Hungarian Vizslas and a TSA-created cross breed of the two called a Vizslador. These dogs have the stature to do the job required, including standing on a seat in a plane and sniffing the overhead compartment.

Christopher
Evolution of Security Blog Team Member

Submitted by Christopher on

Anonymous said, "I'm glad you take the time to answer blog comments, even though you guys tend to ignore the questions that are difficult, and tend to give non-answers (e.g It's a super duper TSA secret!) when the questions get tough.

I'd just like to know, when are the tough questions about beverages (possible bombs! oh no!) being thrown into big trash bins all mixed together and the questions about TSA's poor track record handing delicate equipment like camera lenses going to be answered?

Also, how much security is enough security?"

Well anonymous, I can't speak to super duper secret TSA stuff because I'm only cleared for duper secret :-) Actually, I'll risk hijacking this thread to try to answer some of your questions here:

1) Liquids in the trash represent only one possible component of an IED. It's like have the slingshot but no rocks. No rocks and a sling shot is just a piece of wood with a rubber band.

2) I wasn't aware of a systemic issue of damaging camera lenses. All you shutterbugs out there, let us know on the blog and if it's a major issue, we'll look into it and post a response.

3) "How much security is enough security?" This is a really good one. It sounds cliché but we're focused on risk management, not every providing "enough security." That's why we layer our efforts and back them up again and again. The canines are a great example. They can sniff cargo one minute, then respond to an unattended package in the terminal the next. It's not about providing "enough security," is managing risk.

Hope this helps,

Christopher
EOS Blog Team

Submitted by Dan Kozisek on

Just curious. How long does it take to train a dog to say "do you want to fly today?" ?

Submitted by Txrus on

Christopher said:

Actually, today and for several years TSA has only allowed cargo from properly vetted shippers to even get on a passenger-carrying aircraft.
********************************
Not to rain on your parade, Chris, but have you every actually tried to ship a package at your local post office? (USPS is, I believe, one of your 'known shippers'-heaven knows I see enough of the USPS mail being loaded into every plane I've ever been on!). Did you know that they now have automated machines in the lobbies of many of the PO's that will let someone ship a package w/o ever seeing a human?

Yeah, TSA might know who USPS is, but how does TSA know that everything coming from USPS is 'safe' unless it's being screened? And since we all know that it isn't, we seem to be back to square one which is TSA has no idea what is going in the belly of every commercial airliner in the sky today because there is no method or process in place for screening it.

Submitted by Anonymous on

With the turn over at TSA,
just think, in a few years:

"Ok, you've been cleared through security."

Huh?
* I was just sniffed by a dog? *

The supervisor just cleared you, MOVE!

The supervisor is- that dog?

He's been here longer than any of us....

Submitted by Anonymous on

God, for the sake of the dogs I hope someone really assures that they get good care.

Submitted by Christopher on

Hey there Txrus, as a matter of fact, I have shipped a package at my local post office. Darn nice folks down there too. I have seen the automated kiosks and am also personally familiar with the non-automated “big, blue boxes” on most street corners in America.

Mail is screened differently and is not part of the “known shipper” program.

Christopher
EOS blog team

Submitted by Anonymous on

"God, for the sake of the dogs I hope someone really assures that they get good care."

I'm sure that they live, train and work with their handler/partner. My guess is that they will be among the most respected members of the TSA.

Submitted by Ayn R Key on

I was going to say "and this is important?" but realized this is good news. Dogs can sniff for bombs without stealing. More luggage can be searched less invasively than before.

But Christopher, the comment about how you duck difficult questions is true. Go back to the older blog post about liquids and the 3-1-1 rule.

Submitted by Trollkiller on

txrus said...

Not to rain on your parade, Chris, but have you every actually tried to ship a package at your local post office? (USPS is, I believe, one of your 'known shippers'-heaven knows I see enough of the USPS mail being loaded into every plane I've ever been on!). Did you know that they now have automated machines in the lobbies of many of the PO's that will let someone ship a package w/o ever seeing a human?

Sorry but that is untrue.
Aviation Mail Security Program
Because of heightened security, all mailpieces weighing over 13 ounces bearing only postage stamps as postage must be presented to an employee at a retail service counter at a Post Office.

Submitted by Anonymous on

"Go back to the older blog post about liquids and the 3-1-1 rule."

Or the multiple questions asking for a simple, yes-or-no answer to whether the wannabe terrorists in the London plot had a working binary liquid explosive -- a straighforward question TSA seems strangely unwilling to answer.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Oh, great. Now I can't bring home doggie treats for my dogs without having the luggage torn apart by an over eager dog.

Submitted by Anonymous on

"And remember Qualben, the bomb sniffing Vizslador now on duty at Oakland airport? If you're wondering how he got his unusual name—all of the new dogs bred by the TSA are named after victims of 9/11."

I guess no jokes about that...

Submitted by Txrus on

Trollkiller said:

Sorry but that is untrue.
Aviation Mail Security Program
Because of heightened security, all mailpieces weighing over 13 ounces bearing only postage stamps as postage must be presented to an employee at a retail service counter at a Post Office.
******************************
Please go back & read what I wrote; I'm not talking about a box covered in stamps for postage, though that's certainly allowable, I'm talking about the Automated Postal Centers that are in most PO lobbies now that allow a person to put metered postage on a package & deposit the package for shipping w/o ever going to the retail counter. Having used them personally, I can vouch for their existence.

Submitted by Anonymous on

I am looking forward to the to the day when the TSO sniffs and wags me through.

Or marks me for a secondary by the German Shepard....

Submitted by Anonymous on

But will the dogs catch suspicious computers that do not have hard drives?

Submitted by Anonymous on

I changed to a hard side ski bag (SPORT TUBE )after my bag and skis were ruined on a flight. I have traveled with it 4 times, and three times the fastener which keeps the ski bag closed was not replaced, so the skis could just fall out. In fact, the last two trips the fastener vanished. There is even a sticker there on the case showing how to replace the pin . Is the TSA collecting these ? I even bought a different pin to close the bag on the way back from Reno 2 days ago....got to RDU and the bag was open.


Karen G

Submitted by Anonymous on

Judging by your "witty", "wise" and productive posts its no wonder you people get reffered for seconday screening, or have such a hard time getting through the checkpoint. Be cool next time you fly, and watch for dog bites.

Submitted by Trollkiller on

txrus said...

Please go back & read what I wrote; I'm not talking about a box covered in stamps for postage, though that's certainly allowable, I'm talking about the Automated Postal Centers that are in most PO lobbies now that allow a person to put metered postage on a package & deposit the package for shipping w/o ever going to the retail counter. Having used them personally, I can vouch for their existence.

My apologies, you are correct. I live pretty far out in the sticks so we don't get the fancy equipment, we still have to make due with personal service.

I assume what you are referring to is one of these.

In any case the package mail is handled by a person(s) in the processing center(s), so while you maybe able to drop and go the package is still checked. I will not begin to tell you about postal security but for the most part it is pretty good. While I may not know about fancy mail kiosks, as the only time I go to the lobby of the post office is to pick up my mail and we don’t have one, I can tell you the back end of the post office is a lot more hands on than you would imagine.

As a bulk mailer I’ve seen more of the back end then the front end. Mail that is placed on your plane is safer than the luggage that rides with it.

I will confess I personally have not looked at the back end in 5 or 6 years but I can only imagine (hope) that security is even better now.

Submitted by Anonymous on

"But will the dogs catch suspicious computers that do not have hard drives?"
Depends on what "bits" they can smell....

Submitted by Anonymous on

Karen this blog is about the dogs new to the screening force at tsa, not your skis.. Find the right forum for your ?'s...

Submitted by Anonymous on

When will Kip Hawley provide justification for the ban on very small knives?

Submitted by Anonymous on

"Please go back & read what I wrote; I'm not talking about a box covered in stamps for postage, though that's certainly allowable, I'm talking about the Automated Postal Centers that are in most PO lobbies now that allow a person to put metered postage on a package & deposit the package for shipping w/o ever going to the retail counter. Having used them personally, I can vouch for their existence."

I can vouch for those machines to. While you can get a package metered you will no be able to deposit it unless its very small. Anything package of a normal size you will still have to take to a window to get drop it off.

Submitted by Winstonsmith on

Hi Christopher:

I'm actually all for the idea of using dogs to sniff out potentially dangerous explosive devices in cargo. I have roiled against TSA for not screening cargo in other posts on other areas of this blog, but the pooches are a great idea (see I'm not all about negativity). I do have a question in regard to your statement:

"Using these TSA teams to screen cargo is part of our plan to screen all cargo on passenger-carrying aircraft by August 2010."

What I want to know is how the TSA can justify taking 9 years to get 100% cargo screening in place when cargo screening is the one thing that TSA could possibly do that might stand a chance of making us really any safer in the skies than we were before 9/11.

I would also point out that your plan is to have 100% cargo screening in place. There is an old Hebrew proverb that translates to "Man plans, God laughs." I'm not saying that you won't have screening in place on the schedule you say you will. I am saying, however, that I have my doubts. I am also saying that the cargo screening is not in place today, nearly 7 years after 9/11, which after billions of dollars spent on so-called security in the terminals which has produced no demonstrable or measurable improvement in security which could have been better spent on this effort, is an affront to the American traveler and to the American taxpayer.

Kip Hawley has some serious explaining to do. Cue the tap dancing music.

Submitted by Anonymous on
I can vouch for those machines to. While you can get a package metered you will no be able to deposit it unless its very small. Anything package of a normal size you will still have to take to a window to get drop it off.

That is not universal. I have used those machines often and can tell you that I have encountered at least two that have large package bins attached that easily handled 1) a package slightly larger than a shoe box and 2) a package large enough to hold a well packed motherboard and video card being returned to the manufacturer.

The packages were weighed, metered and deposited without so much as seeing a postal service employee.
Submitted by Anonymous on

Nice "Fluffy" piece. Care to explain this one next?

Submitted by Trollkiller on

winstonsmith said...

Kip Hawley has some serious explaining to do. Cue the tap dancing music.

Good news, winstonsmith, according to this article Kip and all the senior management read the blog.

From the article:
Q. The TSA has its own blog (www.tsa.gov/blog). Have you received constructive ideas from the public or is that mostly venting?

A.(Kip) "Some constructive ideas and a lot of venting. A lot of people are alienated from the TSA. They tune us out. They don't care. We've got to bring them back, at least hear us, acknowledge that we exist. The way to do that is to be transparent and let them vent. Over time the comments are much more balanced. Nobody's sending lovegrams, but they're engaging on the topics and we're engaging back. Specifically, all the stuff about taking the electronics out of the bags _ that came up in the blog and we changed it. That whole stuff about diamond (self-select passenger lanes) and why can't you separate out _ that was in the blog. I read it every day and our senior leadership reads it."
****************
To Kip
We know you are there Kip, every time we are threatened with not being able to fly that day, we know you are there every time our luggage is torn apart and our stuff stolen, we know you are there every time we see a disabled person's sterile medical equipment molested, yes Kip we know you are there.

We hear you Kip, we just don't like what we are hearing. We don't like hearing TSOs have very limited whistle blower protection, we don't like hearing our TSA leaders are cheating, we don't like hearing the TSA has the highest turnover of any Govt. agency.

Yes it is wonderful that we can keep our electronics together or the diamond lanes. That is a good start, but please don't break your arm patting yourself on the back.

Those things are very minor issues compared to retaliatory screening, reading the private papers in a citizen's wallet, the destruction and theft of private property, or the threat of arrest if we complain about the shoddy treatment at the hands of bad TSOs.

If you want real suggestions have the blog team open up a thread for just that. No whining, no venting, just "here is the problem, here is my solution".

If you want us hear you, then talk to us. Don't rely on your underlings, they don't make the rules, you do. Your blog team does a fine job, but their answers are limited.

Just a few hints when dealing with people on the internet. (not trying to be condescending I just have no idea how much blog/newsgroup/chat room experience you have.)

Be honest, trust me there are basement dwellers that enjoy nothing more than proving "the man" wrong.

Don't spin, any attempt to put the "best face" on something will be met with sarcasm and strong correction.

If you screw up, and you will, name it, claim it, correct it and you will be surprised how quickly the screw up is forgotten.

Emotions are not easily ascertained. If you are making a joke that is not 100% clear as a joke, toss a j/k or ;-) at the end. If you look at the laptop thread you will see a few people completely missed Bob's joke about admiring the new laptop. Most of us got it but there is always one in every crowd.

Ok Kip, now that I have vented a bit and offered some suggestion, I want to ask a few questions with a bit of commentary.

1. Why do TSOs not have full whistle blower protection? I want the good TSOs to be able to root out the bad TSOs and managers.

2. Why are complaint forms so difficult to obtain? The traveling citizens want to be rid of the bad TSOs in the worst way. I am sure you do too.

3. When are you going to start a secret flyer program, similar to a secret shopper program? If you really want to find out what is right and what is wrong on the front line, this is the way to do it.

There you go Kip. I eagerly wait your reply.

Submitted by Anonymous on

There is no general comment group so I will ask my question here.

How is the Security effort advanced when a large part of your customers (and growing daily) do not trust TSA nor its TSO's?

It would seem to me that gaining the trust of the public would be job one yet there is apparently little effort given to this issue

Submitted by Anonymous on

Knives have nothing to do with dogs.. Can anybody understand the concept of blogging, and properly place their concerns/comments to the apporpriate forum..

Submitted by Anonymous on

"Judging by your "witty", "wise" and productive posts its no wonder you people get reffered for seconday screening, or have such a hard time getting through the checkpoint. Be cool next time you fly, and watch for dog bites."

woof... double woof, I dare you....

What are you trying to say?

Submitted by Randy on

Mail is screened differently and is not part of the “known shipper” program.

Christopher
EOS blog team

Does that mean all USPS packages that go onto a plane are screened for explosives?

Submitted by Sandra on

Since you chose to not publish my comment, which did not violate the rules, I shall try again:

Talk about mission creep: the TSA is now into breeding designer dogs.

The upside of this is that there should be dogs at each checkpoint to sniff for explosives. Dogs are much more intelligent than many of the screeners.

Submitted by Anonymous on

"Judging by your "witty", "wise" and productive posts its no wonder you people get reffered for seconday screening, or have such a hard time getting through the checkpoint. Be cool next time you fly, and watch for dog bites."

A bite would come from a poorly trained dog....

So, are you saying that a witty or wise mouth is grounds for secondary screening? Isn't this against your own policy? Or are you, on your own, just being insecure, and making empty threats?

Submitted by Anonymous on

"Michael “Mike” Restovich and fellow TSA senior executive Morris “Mo” McGowan ran a private security consulting company while working as high-ranking officials with TSA."

Specifically against their employment contract.

Care to comment about this bit of rot at the top of TSA, or the systemic corruption in general?

Submitted by Jonathan Bradley on

Here in Houston, the feds were recently conducting roadblock checks for all vehicles using a small public ferry. All cars were being searched without cause, indiscriminantly and dogs were brought out to sniff for drugs, etc... all in the name of security. It was big news.

As an author on maritime issues (you can read my book here Jones Act) I must say that I've never heard of this kind of thing.

John Bradley
Lake Charles, LA

Submitted by Winstonsmith on

Thanks Trollkiller...

To your:

"Good news, winstonsmith, according to this article Kip and all the senior management read the blog."

I'll take a look at the article.. btw, I really liked your suggestions, especially the one about putting a "here's the problem and here's my solution" section on the blog. I don't always agree with what you have to say on here but I think you and I could sit down over coffee and have a genuinely reasoned debate about these issues because we can find common ground somewhere. That's what makes this country great.

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