USA Flag

Official website of the Department of Homeland Security

Transportation Security Administration

A Day in the Life of Checkpoint Evolution at BWI

Archived Content

Please note that older content is archived for public record. This page may contain information that is outdated and may not reflect current policy or programs.

If you have questions about policies or procedures, please contact the TSA Contact Center.

Members of the news media may contact TSA Public Affairs.

Thursday, June 05, 2008
tsa logo

Just like scientists strap cameras to wildebeests in the Serengeti, we have strapped a camera to a passenger. For the first time ever, you’ll be able to see exactly what a passenger sees as they walk through their brand new checkpoint at BWI. Watch as the passenger winds through the blue glow of the quiet jungle of machines. It’s like you’re actually there.



Listen to what passengers and Transportation Security Officers have to say about the new checkpoint.





Learn about the new passenger engagement training our Transportation Security Officers are receiving.



Read more about Checkpoint Evolution .

Thanks,

Bob
EoS Blog Team

Comments

Submitted by Anonymous on

Good videos! Now I have a pleasant checkpoint experience to look forward to the next time I visit Baltimore or Washington. Now I hope the next step of the evolution would be to install liquid explosive detectors (they already exist anyway but no airport has them). It would eliminate the need for the inane 3-1-1 rule. This should be instituted at other airports as well.

Submitted by Dunstan on

The first 30 seconds of the first video reminded me of the news today about cutbacks among the major airlines. I hope that you are able to institute the positive aspects of this program across all of the check points that you serve.

Submitted by Anonymous on

41 million fewer flights thanks to the hassles involved in flying these days. TSA: Doing its part to hurt the economy since its inception!

Submitted by Anonymous on

Interesting -- sounds like the TSA figured out it's a good idea to STOP THE YELLING. (Oops -- stop the yelling.)

Now if they can just get the screeners in Orlando to speak intelligible English....

Submitted by Anonymous on

Are you comparing passengers to wildebeast?

Submitted by Adrian on

First video shows some of my common complaints: rows and rows of zig zagging even when there's no line.

I didn't see the "passenger" put his/her shoes into the x-ray.

The "passenger" was not offered the choice of the new imaging machine versus a wanding & pat-down. Didn't you make a big deal about the fact that the passengers have the choice? And the fact that most people chose the scan? If they didn't know there was a choice, then you can't claim that most passengers made a choice.

Are there convenient seats to stop and put your shoes back on?

Submitted by IDisn'tSecurity on

Why isn't there anything up there on the blog discussing any of the ID issues, including this

which prohibits people who willfully decide to not produce identification (but allows for those who have lost their id) from boarding?

Its not like the ID's are checked against a giant terrorist database that each TSO has memorized.

Submitted by HSVTSO Dean on

Might be just a touch disingenuous to declare that the person holding the camera is a passenger. True, while the process (except for the TDC; that was so shoddy as to be shameful - more on that later) is more or less the same as for what passengers go through, that was clearly an employee of TSA.

When the lady reached the TDC position, she handed their boarding pass (or, more likely, just the ticket sleeve) and ID to the TDC officer, who promptly declared "Okay!" and then she went on her way.

The ID is clearly a US Government-issued Transportation Security Administration badge. The shameful part comes in that the TDC screener didn't even pretend to verify the authenticity of the ID, checking neither with light or loupe, both of which would've shown specific security features on the ID.

Tsk.

If yinz are going to go out of your way to make a video, could you at least try to make it accurate as to what happens on the checkpoint?

The public will appreciate it more, and the screeners will be able to back it up.

Otherwise, the video seems pretty straightforward on what to expect going through a checkpoint. Can't wait until the Evolution rolls out at our airport. I've been working around the same scenery for six years now, and it's starting to get downright dull.

Submitted by Trollkiller on
Anonymous said...

Are you comparing passengers to wildebeest?

Have you ever watched a show about wildebeest? Pretty accurate description. From the African Wildlife Foundation web site.

"The famous Serengeti population of wildebeest is a very large nomadic group. These animals make a migratory circle of 500 to 1,000 miles each year"

Wildebeest are noisy creatures. Bulls have an array of loud vocalizations, from moans to explosive snorts.

For the most part wildebeest will follow the leader, but just like airline passengers there is always that one that will buck the system.
Submitted by Eric on

To all the pax who were saying that the lines were short: I assume that's because TSA has significantly increased staffing at this checkpoint. Just wait until they bring it back down!

Submitted by Anonymous on

Annonymous said: "Now if they can just get the screeners in Orlando to speak intelligible English...."

Add Miami airport to that request. I´d be happy if they spoke any English, even unintelligible.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Trollkiller - the one (wildebeast) that bucks the system normally gets eaten..

Submitted by Bob on

Easy folks. No need to get riled up. This was a dry run. Think about it, would we really allow somebody to go through the entire screening process with a camera strapped to them? Once again, this was another one of my attempts at humor. It was a live checkpoint though with actual passengers.

As far as comparing passengers to wildebeests, that wasn't my intention, but Trollkiller did a good job selling it. I almost went with wild bores...

Bob

EoS Blog Team

Submitted by NoClu on

From TSA.gov

Beginning Saturday, June 21, 2008 passengers that willfully refuse to provide identification at security checkpoint will be denied access to the secure area of airports. This change will apply exclusively to individuals that simply refuse to provide any identification or assist transportation security officers in ascertaining their identity.

This new procedure will not affect passengers that may have misplaced, lost or otherwise do not have ID but are cooperative with officers.

So.... You still don't need id to fly, but you have to actually have lost it to fly... or you need to be under 18... Or perhaps I misplaced it in my backpack and I can't find it...

Seriously, are TSA "officers" now going to spend time looking for an drivers license in the bottom of passengers bags? I can only imagine the scenareo.

"ID and Boarding Pass"
"Here you go"
"Where's the ID?"
"It's lost"
"I'll have to examine the contents of your wallet and all the papers, compartments, creases and folds of your clothing and carry-on to determine if you actually have an id conceled on you."
"But I now have a limit-testing carry-on in my possession because the airline is charging $15 for checking a bag. Your administrative search will take forever."
"Too bad citizen, the rules are the rules. Without an appropriate piece of plastic with your name and face on it, or a legitimate description of how and where you lost, damaged or destroyed your id, I can't let you into the secure area of the airport. It is for your own safety."

"Hmm. I feel safer now."

Seriously, Now we are not just subject to retaliatory secondary searches, but denied the ability to travel via air within the United States because of the whim/decree of TSA personnel.

Submitted by Trollkiller on
Anonymous said...
Trollkiller - the one (wildebeast) that bucks the system normally gets eaten..

On the contrary, he is the one that lives. The one that bucks the system completely freaks out the predators so they don't want to eat him because they think he is mad as a hatter.

BTW even though it makes no sense wildebeest is the proper spelling. I only know this because the spellchecker caught it and I had to look it up.
Submitted by Anonymous on

Hey Bobby - when are we going to see a post addressing the anti-freedom of travel initiative requirement of showing ID?

Several court cases, including some from the USC have validated that US citizens have the right to unimpeded travel in the 50 United States. How does this new requirement square with those rulings?

Welcome to the new United States of Communist America. Please present your internal passport for travel authorization. Can you document permission to travel today?

Submitted by Trollkiller on
Bob said...

As far as comparing passengers to wildebeests, that wasn't my intention, but Trollkiller did a good job selling it. I almost went with wild bores...

Bob

EoS Blog Team

Wild BORES would be an oxymoron.

Bore: One that is wearingly dull, repetitive, or tedious.

Boar: Pig.

Wait a sec.... just what ARE you saying??? ;-)
Submitted by Aimee on

"I almost went with wild bores..."

Hey Bob, is that an intentional misspelling? (It's quite funny if it is.)

Submitted by Anonymous on

I see from the TSA press release that travelers who refuse on principle to show their ID will not be allowed through security.

I hope the new, enhanced checkpoints will include language instruction so the TSA employees will be able to properly pronounce, "Papiere, Bitte." You probably should discard the new, blue uniforms and move to the brown shirt look while your at it, too.

T-the-B at flyertalk

Submitted by Anonymous on

DHS/TSA's new rule that a person who wishes to not display ID will not be allow to pass the checkpoint demonstrates without question that your leaders have no concern for citizens rights.

The ability to move about this country unmolested, freely and without having to display papers was a hallmark of being an American.

Much like Nazi Germany, East Germany in more recent times and the old USSR that required travel documents, DHS/TSA has decided that we Americans movements must be controlled and only allowed if you take no exception.

This is not freedom! It is tyranny and will not stand!

I spent 23 years of my life defending this country against Communist and socialist governments only to have a home grown crop come to power here.

This is truly a sad day for democracy and the history of the United States of America.

Commrade Chertoff, Commrade Hawley and all TSA employees, you earn my salute;

Sieg Heil!!

May God save the United States from the misquided actions you have brought!

Submitted by Anonymous on

Bob said, "Think about it, would we really allow somebody to go through the entire screening process with a camera strapped to them?"

Why not Bob, just what would the camera see?

TSO's abusing travelers?

TSO's standing around without a clue?

Just what is so secret at one of your checkpoints that I can view it with my eyes but not record it on film?

Just what does TSA have to hide that they are afraid of citizens seeing?

Not so transparent as you make out!

Submitted by Bob on
Anonymous said... Bob said, "Think about it, would we really allow somebody to go through the entire screening process with a camera strapped to them?"

Why not Bob, just what would the camera see?

TSO's abusing travelers?

TSO's standing around without a clue?

Just what is so secret at one of your checkpoints that I can view it with my eyes but not record it on film?

Just what does TSA have to hide that they are afraid of citizens seeing?

Not so transparent as you make out!

June 6, 2008 10:39 PM

OK, you can take off your tin foil hat now.

Think about it. You're taking it in the wrong direction.

It's not what you can see with a camera, it's what you can conceal in a camera.

Watch the video again. Do you ever once see the camera inspected? Nope...

Bob

EoS Blog Team
Submitted by Anonymous on

re:
OK, you can take off your tin foil hat now.

Sure, and your agency just made travel papers a requirement.

What is so sad is your going along for the ride. Are you blind?

Submitted by Trollkiller on

IDisn'tSecurity said...

Why isn't there anything up there on the blog discussing any of the ID issues

Let me help you out with the link.

Submitted by Casey on
Anonymous: 41 million fewer flights thanks to the hassles involved in flying these days. TSA: Doing its part to hurt the economy since its inception!

Pre-"9/11" security was an absolute joke and everybody knew it. Oh boy, contracted "security" firms -- glorified mall security guards -- watching over our nation's airports. Half those firms didn't care either..their eyes were on the bottom line and would hire just about anybody. Anything could be better than that. They were practically letting just about anybody walk on a plane with anything...and one day they did just that.

At least a real federal agency is thinking very closely about the entire security problem, standardizing security, hiring quality personal (and paying them the living wage they deserve), and making an attempt to improve passenger experience (which is rare for a federal agency).

The TSA is not perfect, and any security is going to inconvenience a traveler. If you just ignored the security problem, i am certain there would be a whole lot more than 43 million fewer flights....
Submitted by Anonymous on

"This change will apply exclusively to individuals that simply refuse to provide any identification or assist transportation security officers in ascertaining their identity."

And who is to decide who isn't being "cooperative?" A rookie TSO having a bad day? Come on, TSA. You've got to be kidding me. We have freedom of movement in this country. I've paid my taxes to pay for the TSA and the FAA. My local tax dollars keep the airport open. I've purchased a seat on the airplane. Give me my SSSS and move on.

Submitted by Trollkiller on

casey said...

Pre-"9/11" security was an absolute joke and everybody knew it. Oh boy, contracted "security" firms -- glorified mall security guards -- watching over our nation's airports. Half those firms didn't care either..their eyes were on the bottom line and would hire just about anybody. Anything could be better than that. They were practically letting just about anybody walk on a plane with anything...and one day they did just that.

At least a real federal agency is thinking very closely about the entire security problem, standardizing security, hiring quality personal (and paying them the living wage they deserve), and making an attempt to improve passenger experience (which is rare for a federal agency).

The TSA is not perfect, and any security is going to inconvenience a traveler. If you just ignored the security problem, i am certain there would be a whole lot more than 43 million fewer flights....

Before you start throwing stones at the pre 9/11 screeners lets look at some of the quality people the TSA has hired.

Arrested for having sex with a child.

Arrested for one count of third-degree grand theft, one count of making a false or misleading statement for issuance of a state handicapped permit and one count of cheating. (Felony)

Accused of faking his military record. (Federal Offense)

Those three stories were from the last couple of weeks. The next story gives tips to prevent the TSOs from stealing your stuff. It also tells about the 200 TSOs that have been fired for theft.

If the weekly news stories are to be believed, the TSA background checks are a joke. The TSA is as guilty as the private companies when it comes to "hiring just anybody".

You say the TSA is "thinking very closely about the entire security problem". Thinking does NOT equal doing.

If thinking equaled doing, luggage would not be so easily tampered with.

If thinking equaled doing, the TSA would be employing explosive detection puffers.

If thinking equaled doing, there would NOT be a pilot program to do an ID ONLY screen for pilots.

If thinking equaled doing, the TSA would be placing the money wasted on fancy lights, background music and faux cop uniforms into REAL security measures.

If thinking equaled doing, my hazardous water would not be tossed in a non bombproof container.

Do you see a pattern?

As for the rarity of a Government agency trying to improve the customer experience, don't fool yourself. The TSA is not doing it out of the goodness of their heart, they are doing it because people like me won't shut up. The TSA has reached its limit when it comes to the goodwill of the public.

Of course loosing $102,500,000 in security fees because of people driving instead of flying so they don't have to deal with the TSA helps to push them in the right direction.

The TSA is run by career bureaucrats, they are more worried what a new administration will do then they are about what a terrorist will do.

Why do you think there has been a sudden surge in new equipment, uniforms, programs and over reaching policies? Could it be that the career bureaucrats know that it is harder to kill a program once it is in place?

The TSA is about job security not transportation security. Knowing the odds of another 9/11 style attack is remote the TSA is setting itself up to be the national dragnet agency. Why else do you think they would be requiring IDs? Right now the TSO checking the ID has NOTHING, I repeat NOTHING, to compare it to. Do you think they can remember everybody on the no fly list?

So why the ID check? Maybe it has something to do with the $2 BILLION IT contract. Is the TSA's plan to cross check every ID against every law enforcement database? Is it going to cross check IDs against people that post negative comments about the TSA on the internet?

How far do we let them go under the disguise of security? Remember the TSA is over ALL transportation. At what point will they find the need to expand into other areas?

People like you have the attitude that if you don't want to deal with the TSA then don't fly. Next it will be if you don't want to deal with the TSA don't take the train, then the bus, the ferry, the boats and finally the cars and bicycles.

You may think I am being funny but ALL those above mentioned transportation devices have been used by terrorists in the past so I can assume they will be used by them in the future.

How far do we allow the TSA to go? At what point will we as a people say enough is enough?

Everyone on this blog wants security, everyone on this blog wants to stop terrorists. Not everyone on this blog is a terrorist and we need to STOP being treated as such.

The TSA needs to STOP trying to push the limits of what is allowed by the courts. There is no need to violate the spirit and the letter of the Constitution just to see how far you can go.

Yesterday (June 6) was the 64th anniversary of D-Day. Operation Overlord sent 160,000 men into France to save the people of Europe from tyranny. 9000 men were killed or wounded ON D-Day. Some never made it out of their boats or onto the beach.

Those that did survive D-Day used June 6th as the start of the rest of their lives. I asked a hero what country he was wounded in, his reply was "D-Day plus 32". You see it did not matter to him where he was wounded, it mattered why he was wounded.

He bled on foreign ground to give those people freedom and to protect ours. His life blood was fused into that soil for the idea that no man anywhere should have to hear the words "papers please". The idea that no man should be subject to the whims of the power hungry or powerful.

To that hero and the millions just like him, I am sorry we have let you down. I am sorry we have failed and let your courage, sacrifice and honor fall to the wayside.

Please forgive us as we know not what we have done.

Submitted by Anonymous on

When are you going to address our concerns regarding the hidden viewing of full body scan images?

Submitted by Anonymous on

Seriously, do people at the TSA actually believe their own PR junk? It is blindingly obvious to outsiders how completely inept and incompetent the TSA is (what Mensa member came up with 3-1-1?); is it not also the case to insiders?

Submitted by Dunstan on

"Pre-"9/11" security was an absolute joke and everybody knew it. Oh boy, contracted "security" firms -- glorified mall security guards -- watching over our nation's airports. Half those firms didn't care either..their eyes were on the bottom line and would hire just about anybody. Anything could be better than that. They were practically letting just about anybody walk on a plane with anything...and one day they did just that."

Yes, ONE day they did. That day was more the failure of the command chain of the intelligence community, than the then active airport security. It's not like TSA has plugged all the holes. People on both sides of the check point experience are unhappy. Judging from the more than 20% average turn over rate of TSA employees over the past few years, I'm going to guess things are not that rosy. I'm not sure the hiring practices or the training differs remarkably from the pre-9/11 situation. Picking the one out of a billion travelers that might be a terrorist just isn't easy. It take some highly skilled and motivated people to do it well. Annoying billions of travelers who present no threat is a problem, and one that is just beginning to be addressed.

Submitted by Anonymous on

I just got a "This video is no longer available" message from Youtube for all 4 videos. Any chance you could repost them?

Submitted by Anonymous on

"Oh boy, contracted "security" firms -- glorified mall security guards -- watching over our nation's airports. Half those firms didn't care either..their eyes were on the bottom line and would hire just about anybody."

This is in no way different from the situation with TSA: Incompetent or arrogant screeners are the norm, and little of the screening process enhances security while much of it hurts security.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Anonymous Said:

"41 million fewer flights thanks to the hassles involved in flying these days. TSA: Doing its part to hurt the economy since its inception!"

I read the article and didn't see any reference to TSA at all. Not even airport security was mentioned...simply the hassles of traveling which are numerous besides being screened.

Submitted by Andy on

I've tried to understand your side and ignore what people were saying about mission creep, but now it's official. Your new mandate that anyone who refuses to show ID will be refused entry in the sterile area has gone too far. In America, we have the right to travel domestically without ID. Some people don't feel comfortable showing ID, some has religious reasons, and some simply don't have ID. Give them a SSSS like you always did, but why interview them? Why waste their time? If someone forgot their ID, just put them in the SSSS lane, and be over with it.

I swear, this is feeling more and more like internal borders everyday. And, no, I don't have a tin foil hat on. It's just the way I see it. Why don't you post a blog entry with your reason and/or an explanation, or simply reverse the rule?

Submitted by Vlado on

What is secret at one of your checkpoints that I can view it but not record it?

Submitted by Eric on

Re: TSA's so-very-pleased-with-itself press release on the upcoming requirement, as referenced by several people here already and found at http://www.tsa.gov/press/happenings/enhance_id_requirements.shtm, that passengers will be required to present approved ID to get on a plane.


So when do TSOs get training on the proper pronunciation of "Papiere bitte, kameraden!", anyways? Finally decided to stop pussyfooting around and really own up to the fact that you guys are a branch of the American version of the Komityet Gosudarstvennoy Bezopasnosti? (Actually, perhaps you should be practicing Russian, instead: "бумаги угождают, камрад!")

I can't even *BEGIN* to explain to you people how offended I am by your agency's gross destruction of some of the basic freedoms of this country, to say nothing of basic common courtesy. Rest assured, you will ***NEVER*** see my ID. ID has ***NOTHING*** to do with security, and [Jedi mind trick] you have no need to see my identification [/Jedi mind trick], for ANY cause whatsoever. LAW ENFORCEMENT doesn't get to see it except for a legitimate traffic stop or in the event of an actual criminal investigation, what makes you believe you have the right to see it when all I want to do is get on a frakking PLANE?

Treating those people who your own agency has referred to as "customers" as if they were actually convicted violent felons might have a little to do with the 41 million fewer flights per year the airline industry is suffering. Thanks TSA - thanks to YOU, the terrorists have indeed won.

I WEEP for my country.

Submitted by Sandra on

Trollkiller, a beautiful post - thank you very much.

However, the number of screeners fired for theft is, according to the TSA, 411. Given the TSA's habit of underestimating the number of complaints it receives, I'm will the bet the number could be double that.

To the anonymous person who said that he/she didn't see any mention of the TSA in the article about fewer number of fliers, you're right. The article did not mention the TSA by name, but it did refer to "travelers are most irritated with the air travel process" and "inefficient security screening." Who provides that inefficient security screening? Why the TSA, of course

Now to some other issues:

1. From USA Today re: the MMW at BWI:

"Passengers scanned in Baltimore said they did not know what the scanner did and were not told why they were directed into the booth.

(IOW, they were not offered the option of a patdown or the scan.)

Magazine-sized signs are posted around the checkpoint explaining the scanners, but passengers said they did not notice them....

("Magazine-sized signs" because the TSA does not want you to see them.)

Darin Scott of Miami was annoyed by the process.

"If you don't ask questions, they don't tell you anything," Scott said. When he asked a screener technical questions about the scanner, "he could not answer," Scott said."

2. ID required to get into the "sterile" area:

Since the TSA can't deny anyone the right to fly without ID, they have now come up with something "better": you can't access the "sterile" area of the airport without ID and the third degree by a SPOT-nik and a cop.

The TSA knows it can't enforce their "no ID, no fly" lie, so they throw up another roadblock: you can't get to the sterile area which in effect means that you can't fly.

The sad thing is that, as has been said so many, many times, anyone with evil intent is going to present him/herself with completely valid ID, just as happened on 9/11.

I don't think it will be very long before this new requirement is challenged in court as it is nothing more than an extremely blatant way to get around the "you can fly domestically without ID" Court ruling.

Submitted by Anonymous on

RE: ID required after 6/21/2008

Question for the legal types.

Would subverting the constitution be an offense of treason?

I would like to find a legal group would would take this matter.

Submitted by HSVTSO Dean on
Andy wrote:
Why don't you post a blog entry with your reason and/or an explanation, or simply reverse the rule?

Mhm.

TSA very seldom gives justification to the screeners on the line for their decisions. We haven't been told any justification for this personally, but I can offer some conjecture of my own:

/conjecture on

It's been mentioned elsewhere on this blog that the Aviation Transportation Security Act of 2001 gave the then-formed TSA statutory authority to require IDs to be shone prior to entry into the sterile area. At the time, they chose not to do so.

Here lately, there's been a kind of.. humm.. let's call it 'grassroots' movement of a kind of "civil disobedience" (as an activist friend of mine would call it) to not show IDs at security checkpoints. At the time, this was okay. We just made 'em a selectee and moved on.

Again this is all my own conjecture without any kind of proof to back it up, not even two-eyes observation. For all I know, that whole movement could just be six people that fly once every six months. But, on the assumption that it's a massive thing, let's continue:

Now, as this movement gets bigger and more and more people are having to be made selectees, it's starting to bog down the screening process. My own airport is relatively light compared to the big Class-X ports - my shift usually screens about a thousand or so passengers a day - but if "Bad Stuff" happens (flight delays and cancellations, rebooks, etc) that causes a large number of people to become selectees, it starts to cramp up the checkpoint.

Now, as I see it, with the TSA checkpoints being more and more bogged down by people refusing to show their ID, the TSA has taken steps to help solve the problem to promote passenger flow and efficiency.

In short, some people wanted to flex their muscles, and in so doing began to disrupt the steady flow of traffic through the checkpoints. The TSA flexed back using the statutory authority granted to it by the Congress in it's inception.

/conjecture off

Now, whether or not travel document checking provides any kind of real and effective security additions - that's a whole separate argument. Personally, I'm of the belief that it does not, but then I suppose it also depends upon your point of view.

In many ways, TSA has been shifting gears in the recent past, going from threat-items to threat-people. From what I've read on the public websites and such, and the creation of the BDO position, the goal is not to keep dangerous items off of airplanes, but to keep dangerous people with dangerous intent off of airplanes.

I can understand that point of view. However—

If the person has done nothing wrong within the scope of what we screen for, then they've done nothing wrong within the scope of what we screen for. They have no prohibited items with which to inflict harm, and being a malcontent isn't against the law. I'm of the opinion that you can't suspend someone's civil liberties because of what they might do.

Hindsight, as ever, will be 20/20 in this regard. Hypothetically speaking, I'm sure people all over would just adore us incidentally stopping and delivering into law enforcement hands, like, a serial rapist or mass-murderer or something - and then, in the next instantm, declaim about how much of a violation of civil rights it is.

It tends to swing one side to the other dependant upon who'se being asked for their IDs.

P.S.: I know the origin of the "Papers please" thing was the Gestapo, but can anybody show the historical accuracy of what those papers actually were? A brief search before I had to wrap this up and go to the screening floor came up with a whooooole bunch of stuff that had nothing at all to do with the actual historical Gestapo.
Submitted by Anonymous on

You folks that say ID's have nothing to do with security aren't thinking very deeply. Who would be carrying false ID? Criminals? Terrorists? Illegal Aliens? No TSA isn't ICE and isn't the border patrol but those agencies also fall under the department of Homeland Security of which TSA is an arm. You must have a drivers license and obey the rules of the road to have the privelege of driving in this country. Yes driving is a priveledge just like flying is.

You can call it a dragnet but I'm pretty sure the TSA isn't trying to prevent law abiding citizens from flying. For God's sakes I have to show my ID to purchase alcohol and I have been of age for over 20 years. Why is this such a big deal?

Submitted by Bob Eucher on

Vlado said...

What is secret at one of your checkpoints that I can view it but not record it?

Its ALL secret, kind of like the "secret" list of the no photos allowed public buildings. You can view them all you want, but can't photograph it.

If we can have "secret" laws and rules, then we can detain & arrest US citizens without any explaining. It is just easier than following that thing called the Constitution.

BTW: Trollkiller should run for president!

Submitted by Anonymous on

I have to commend TSA for actually keeping this blog up to date and attempting to your technology to update the public with changes and progress reports.

Like everything about fling these days, its not perfect, but at least there is some effort going into it.

Submitted by Jane on

Nice videos...Really Enjoyed..thanks!!!

Submitted by NoClu on

USA Today: By Thomas Frank 6/9/08
http://www.usatoday.com/travel/flights/2008-06-05-bodyscan_N.htm

"It's the wave of the future," said James Schear, the TSA security director at Baltimore-Washington International Airport, where two body scanners are in use at one checkpoint.

The TSA says it protects privacy by blurring passengers' faces and deleting images right after viewing. Yet the images are detailed, clearly showing a person's gender. "You can actually see the sweat on someone's back," Schear said.

Passengers scanned in Baltimore said they did not know what the scanner did and were not told why they were directed into the booth.”

Highly detailed imaging.
Withholding information from “selectees”.
Cavalier attitude from TSA security director.

Hmm. Blogger Bob’s you’re going to have to get creative again.

The people in charge of your agency are running out of control.

Submitted by Anonymous on

It's quite interesting that comments positive to the TSA show up long before anti-TSA comments posted much earlier.

Submitted by Txrus on

Trollkiller said on June 7, 2008 6:32 AM

Those three stories were from the last couple of weeks. The next story gives tips to prevent the TSOs from stealing your stuff. It also tells about the 200 TSOs that have been fired for theft.
*********************************
Just a point of reference, did you see the Hartford Courant article over the weekend, Trollkiller, where TSA spokeswoman Ann Davis is quoted in the article as saying, '411 officers have been fired during the past five years for theft.' (Sorry I can't embed the link like you do-I'm techy challenged; there's a link to the article on FlyterTalk)

Then casey said June 7, 2008 12:58 AM...

Pre-"9/11" security was an absolute joke and everybody knew it. Oh boy, contracted "security" firms -- glorified mall security guards -- watching over our nation's airports. Half those firms didn't care either..their eyes were on the bottom line and would hire just about anybody. Anything could be better than that. They were practically letting just about anybody walk on a plane with anything...and one day they did just that.
**********************************
Casey-the only reason the 9/11 plot succeded the way it did was because 4 pilots, on 4 different planes, followed their companies policies, opened the doors to their cockpits & cooperated w/the hijackers. Since then the airlines have changed their policies to require that the doors remain locked, regardless of what is going on in the cabin, & the pilot LAND THE PLANE.

THAT, not the TSA nor any of it's security theatrics (lights, music, costumes, or loupes), will prevent another 9/11-style attack.

You're right that this agency isn't perfect, however, after all the years it has now been in existence, & all the billions upon billions of dollars they have squandered, the traveling public has the right, & responsibility, to demand better. Over the course of this blog's existence, there have been numerous well-thought out suggestions made; hopefully some of them might, one day, be implemented. However, as the current administration comes to a close & the tenure of those in the senior leadership roles w/in the TSA also ends, I am doubtful this will happen any time soon.

Submitted by Anonymous on

So I might be a moron but what does 3-1-1 stand for anyway?

I've seen the signs, I've read about it on these boards, but the numbers still remain a mystery to me?

Oh and by the way... TSA already run you though a database when you buy your ticket. They check your ID to assure that you're the same person as the owner of the ticket.

Submitted by Anonymous on

"Yes driving is a priveledge just like flying is. "

Is rail travel a privilege?

Is bus travel a privilege?

Is travel by ferry a privilege?

Is interstate travel a privilege?

Is intrastate travel a privilege?

Is the free movement of a citizen a right or a privilege?

It is called a slippery slope.

We are moving down it. Some are calling out for us to join in the slide down the slope and be 'safer'.

Others are saying the directions we are taking are wrong, un-American and in too many cases provide no real security.

Each freedom we lose is a another victory for terror.

,>)

T. Saint

Submitted by Bob Eucher on

Anonymous said...

You folks that say ID's have nothing to do with security aren't thinking very deeply.

Oh, but we are.

Check this out: http://www.10news.com/investigations/14654657/detail.html

The few seconds that the TSA agent looks at an ID, I doubt that they would be able to detect a good fake ID. As long as picture matches person, and name matches ticket, they let you pass.

Can anyone site where a known terrorist has been apprehended and proven to be a terrorist from just the ID check? I will guess, not.

This article spells out what may happen:

You will note, not one was ever found to be a terrorist. I fail to understand how any of that increased security. If they are finding that many instances, then how many are they NOT finding, and I have yet to hear of any planes going down.

ID checks may find criminals, but I doubt they will ever find a terrorist.

Submitted by Trollkiller on
Bob Eucher said...

Its ALL secret, kind of like the "secret" list of the no photos allowed public buildings. You can view them all you want, but can't photograph it.

If we can have "secret" laws and rules, then we can detain & arrest US citizens without any explaining. It is just easier than following that thing called the Constitution.

BTW: Trollkiller should run for president!

Only rich people can become President. Sadly I am not rich, because I would rather be honest and true.

If I were to run this would be my platform.

1)Immigration: Secure borders. Immigration status would be checked during any negative law enforcement contact. i.e. get pulled over, immigration check, reporting a crime, no check. Businesses that knowingly hire illegals would be fined heavily and those responsible would be jailed.

2)Health care: Single tier pricing. If the visit, med or procedure is worth $40 when insurance is paying, then it is worth $40 when I am paying. All meds would be OTC except for the very few that require special handling, those would require a safety certificate.

Taxes: Flat tax, no reason Bill Gates should pay a higher or lower percentage than I do. All men are created equal, we should be taxed equally.

Energy: Reduce oil consumption to less than what we produce domestically by increasing solar, wind and nuclear energy production. Offer a no cost electrical conversion for older cars. (current cost about $10k per car)

Iraq: We are already there, stabilize the country and place bases there to protect the oil supply against hostile countries like Iran. Once we have reduced oil to domestic production only, pull out.

Domestic: End affirmatively action, either make it on your own or don't make it. End eminent domain cases where the reason for seizure is to increase the tax base. End law enforcement seizures except where a CONVICTION warrants it. End hidden "laws". If you can't show me the law saying I can't photograph a certain building then you are committing fraud and should be prosecuted.

I think I would rather head up the TSA than be President. It would be easier to get things done. Please keep my chair warm Kip.

If I were head of the TSA here is what I would do.

Cargo: All airline cargo would be secured by plastic straps to show the cargo has been screened and to discourage tampering.

Passengers: If they are not driving the thing you do not need to see ID. If the airlines want to check ID for their own business purposes that is fine.

Airports: All TSOs will be trained in first aid and CPR. Defibrillators would be available at all checkpoints.

Any invocation of a non existent law will result in immediate termination and fine of two weeks pay.

Any theft would result in immediate termination and fine of $15,000.

Pre-paid postage comment cards will be available at ALL "stops" in the screening area, No ID required. All comment cards with either a valid email, phone or mailing address will be responded to.

Of course I have more but I am running late for work. Please forgive the typos as I don't have time to proof read this.

Pages