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New ID Requirements Begin Tomorrow

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Friday, June 20, 2008
ID

If you're flying tomorrow, or anytime in the near future, you may want to make a note that tomorrow is the day the TSA enhances its ID requirements. There have been many misconceptions of the new requirements and I just wanted to attempt to clear things up a little bit.

We've all been there. You've got a million things to do before you fly. Pay bills, pack, get the kids ready, get your clothes from the dry cleaner, you name it. Whatever it is you have to do, it's inevitable that you'll forget at least one of them from time to time. (Hopefully not the kids) I usually forget my toothbrush.

What if you forget your ID? Is your vacation ruined? Are you going to miss your meeting? Are you going to miss the Elvis Costello show this weekend at the Glasgow Royal Concert Hall? Not at all… If you simply state you forgot your ID, we will work with you to verify your ID, you may undergo some additional screening and will be permitted to fly.

On the other hand, if you do not cooperate and state that you're not willing to show us your ID, you will not be permitted to fly.

You show your ID to test drive a car, view an apartment, buy a house, cash a check, buy cigarettes or alcohol, rent videos and so forth. The list could go on and in some of these circumstances; they hold onto your card or make a copy. We're just asking for a few moments of your time to ensure your name matches the name on your ticket.

Is this about control? No. It's about knowing who is getting on the plane. It's about shifting our focus towards people instead of items on a list. You know as well as we do that you can make a weapon out of anything. The naked human body of someone skilled in martial arts is far more dangerous than most people with a weapon. We know that and we're shifting towards that line of thought. It is going to be a huge change in our culture, but I and others firmly believe this is the proper evolution path for security.

If our goal is to keep bad people off of planes, and our law enforcement and intelligence partners have gone to the lengths of creating watch lists of known terrorists to keep them off said planes, we have to know for sure that each person who goes through matches the name on their boarding pass and is who they say they are. Most people are not a threat, but we know there are people out there that could pose a threat. Letting anyone go through who says "I don't want to show my ID" is not good security. It's not a poke in the eye to certain folks – it's about security for everyone and we view verifying identity as importantly as we view having passengers pass through metal detectors.

Make sure you also check out Christopher's blog post on IDs.

Bob
EoS Blog Team

Comments

Submitted by Ayn R Key on
hsvtso wrote
As for the unjustified comment - there's no regulation or requirement set upon me by TSA that justifies me showing a passenger my government credentials upon demand. Ergo, my nameplate with first name and serial number.

And, given that it probably will not diffuse the disagreement over the ID concerns...

You won't convince me.

I won't convince you.

Wanna just leave it at that?

No.

How do I know you are the person the name plate belongs to?

You could be wearing someone else's nameplate and badge.

You could be a terrorist who stole a plate and badge from a TSO.

Don't I deserve to be safe from terrorists?

Apparently I don't deserve to be safe from terrorists, but I knew that TSOs (including you) don't have the job of keeping me safe anyway.
Submitted by HSVTSO Dean on
Anonymous wrote:
This means that they are in fact checking us against some database of people who are not permitted access.

Hm. Shooting from the hip again here, but this is my take on the process:

The no-fly list is accomplished on the airline side of the system, when you check-in. In a manner of speaking, I suppose you could look at it from the point of view of: You were issued a boarding pass by the airline which means you are not on the no-fly list, we check your identification against the boarding pass (and, for sake of argument, we're going to ignore all of the spygame-esque stuff) and make a reasonable judgement against your face with the image on the identification you provide. If we conclude that everything's in good order, we have established that you are not on the no-fly list given that the airlines have given you a boarding pass, and you appear to check out with it.

It's not so much a positive-establishment that you're not on the no-fly list, whereas it's more of a negative-check.

Or, in simpler terms:

"You have a boarding pass, let me make sure you are the person on the boarding pass.... hmm... okay, you are, that means you're not on the no-fly list."

As opposed to:

"Let's see if you're on the no-fly list... hmm... nope, okay, you're good to go."

Now, I might be wrong about how the process works, but that's just me logically trying to work my way around to figuring out what the TSA says compared to what we actually do.

And, just in case some people still aren't clear on the concept, being given the SSSS treatment doesn't mean you're on the no-fly list. Taking from TSA's public website:

"Whether you're eight or 80, the most common occurrence is name confusion and individuals are told they are on the no fly list when in fact, they are not. If you get a boarding pass, you’re not on the no fly list."

I think your lawyers are wrong on this one.

And you're welcome to that opinion. :) Granted, a lawyer is not a judge (nor a panel of judges), even Ms. Chief Counsel herself. When the first lawsuit is filed over this, we'll have to just wait and see how the Judiciary sees it.

Even then, though, there will be people who think it's wrong. Just take the DC handgun ban being overturned by the Supreme Court this week - I think the Mayor of Chicago was very adamant in expressing his beliefs that it was a wrong decision.

How does that action compromise you?

It doesn't in the least. But I'm still not going to show it if you make a demand of it and I don't have any regulation that requires me to show it to you.

Ask nicely, instead. :)
Submitted by HSVTSO Dean on

Prate all the rhetoric you want - you're still not getting my government credentials unless you ask nicely. :)

And I'm through with this particular discussion, since it's plain that nothing more constructive will be had from it.

Submitted by Trollkiller on

To HSVTSO Dean:

I have to agree with my fellow travelers. Your photo ID should be on display.

If I ask a police officer, meter reader or even an IRS employee to show me their entity issued ID they are required to show me. Why not a TSO?

Submitted by Yangj08 on

"As for the unjustified comment - there's no regulation or requirement set upon me by TSA that justifies me showing a passenger my government credentials upon demand. Ergo, my nameplate with first name and serial number."
As opposed to the regulation set upon the travelers by the TSA that apparently no one can find a justification for? Seems that we both want to say no to showing full ID, but you have the government on your side.

Submitted by HSVTSO Dean on
Trollkiller:

I have to agree with my fellow travelers. Your photo ID should be on display.

Incidentally, I also have a SIDA-access badge issued by the airport with my full name and photo hanging from my left pocket, but it's not the government credentials. Once upon a time, said government credentials were behind the SIDA badge facing the opposite direction (the thing spins relentlessly all the time, and for some reason always seems to land face-down when it decides to stay. Instead of always flipping my SIDA badge around to face forward, I just put my credentials behind it).

Unfortunately, it's not very sturdy. The little piece of plastic that holds it over the thicker piece of plastic that hangs from the ID reel broke, so it now resides quite comfortably in my wallet.

I haven't mentioned the SIDA badge until now because everybody's been focused on the government credentials themselves, which have no place in the official uniform or any relevance at all outside of temporary duty assignments. :)

If I ask a police officer, meter reader or even an IRS employee to show me their entity issued ID they are required to show me. Why not a TSO?

That, sir, is the right question that I've been waiting for someone to ask.

Probably because TSA doesn't keep track of us or identify us by our firstname.lastname, but rather by firstname.serialnumber. So if there's any kind of compliment or complaint filled out, and hell even on paperwork like HAZMAT discovery forms and such, it always asks for firstname.serialnumber.
Submitted by Tomas on
Trollkiller said:
If I ask a police officer, meter reader or even an IRS employee to show me their entity issued ID they are required to show me. Why not a TSO?
HSVTSO Dean said:
That, sir, is the right question that I've been waiting for someone to ask.

Probably because TSA doesn't keep track of us or identify us by our firstname.lastname, but rather by firstname.serialnumber. So if there's any kind of compliment or complaint filled out, and hell even on paperwork like HAZMAT discovery forms and such, it always asks for firstname.serialnumber.

To continue, if I may, that still does not answer the simple question from Trollkiller: Why not the TSO if all those other 'officials' show their when asked while performing their duties? (Even as a civilian employee, when challenged I'd ALWAYS show my ID.)

A picture ID with however your employer identifies you would help to show the nameplate is legitimately yours, not found, borrowed, stolen, or just plain fake. (Blue uniform shirts are available at most any uniform supplier.)

Thanks!
Tom
Submitted by Anonymous on

Once again, I must ask what constitutes an acceptable form of identification. I have been told that it must be a government issued photo ID with an expiration date, but TSA refused to accept my USDA-issued photo ID badge. (Yes, my ID card has an expiration date, and it is HSPD-12 compliant.)

Will TSA document checkers accept Kip Hawley's TSA-issued photo ID card? Or will they claim that they don't know what it is and require Kip to produce a driver's license instead?

Submitted by Trollkiller on
HSVTSO Dean said...
Trollkiller:
Once upon a time, said government credentials were behind the SIDA badge facing the opposite direction (the thing spins relentlessly all the time, and for some reason always seems to land face-down when it decides to stay.

If I ask a police officer, meter reader or even an IRS employee to show me their entity issued ID they are required to show me. Why not a TSO?

That, sir, is the right question that I've been waiting for someone to ask.

Probably because TSA doesn't keep track of us or identify us by our firstname.lastname, but rather by firstname.serialnumber. So if there's any kind of compliment or complaint filled out, and hell even on paperwork like HAZMAT discovery forms and such, it always asks for firstname.serialnumber.


The SIDA badge always turning backwards is just God's way of protecting the public from bad photographs.
;-)

So you are tracked by firstname.serialnumber, that makes sense as there must be a bunch of John Smiths among the past and present TSA employee base.

In that case you should have a picture ID that conveys firstname.serialnumber, the airport you are attached to, expiration date and your position. (TSO, Supervisor, BDO)

As has been brought up, how do we know you are you?

You could be just some thief that stole a uniform and are using it to scam unsuspecting passengers.

Remind me and I will start asking the TSA why they don't make you carry ID, just as soon as I finish whooping up on them for requiring me to show ID.
:-D
Submitted by HSVTSO Dean on

It's all in the presentation, Tom. I've said multiple times that if someone asks nicely, I have no problem in the world whipping my wallet out and showing the credentials.

What I have a problem with is someone making an outright demand for it, and I'm not required to do whatever it is that they demand.

I'm American that way. Sue me.

Did the same thing to a police officer one time, who thought he had a cheap and easy drug bust (just to give you some background, this is a picture of me, albiet heavily shadowed. This is another one, chosen specifically because of the jewelery I wear on my hand). The cop saw me and figured "Hey, this kid must have some kind of drugs! I'll make up some stupid lie about someone seeing him walking around with a shotgun so I can search him!"

And he did. But since I don't even drink, much less use illegal narcotics, I had not a problem in the world with him wanting to search my vehicle or me.

But when he made the demand that I stand in a particular spot, instead of asking nicely, I very purposefully stood one foot to the left of it and asked if it was good enough.

All it takes is a little civility.

"Hey, can I see your government ID?"

See? It's not too hard. Just ask nicely, and all the world might come to you. :)

Anonymous wrote:
Once again, I must ask what constitutes an acceptable form of identification. I have been told that it must be a government issued photo ID with an expiration date, but TSA refused to accept my USDA-issued photo ID badge. (Yes, my ID card has an expiration date, and it is HSPD-12 compliant.)

Federal Government credentials are no longer acceptable as a sole form of ID. They must be presented with a second form of ID, now, such as -- oh, anything with your name on it. A utility bill, for example, works just fine. Hell, a credit card with your name on it works, too.

In general, to fall under the "other federal government-issued IDs" criteria, the card has to have your photo, your date of birth, an expiration date, an~nd... a couple of other things. I'm at home, so I can't look it up on this computer.

Yeah. A State-issued driver's license is your best bet. Or military ID. If you have one, a TWIC card works just as well, too.

No form of municipal credentials is good, though. No firefighter cards, no police ID badges, etc etc.

Like I said earlier in this thread, the allowable-ID media has been narrowed significantly. I'm not terribly sure why TSA chose to do this, but it's been a monumental PITA.

Will TSA document checkers accept Kip Hawley's TSA-issued photo ID card? Or will they claim that they don't know what it is and require Kip to produce a driver's license instead?

You're trying to be snarky, I think, but you're actually speaking the truth. If Kip Hawley (or anyone else in TSA) was there at the airport on official business, then our TSA-issued blue ID card is enough to get us into and past the checkpoint for us to do our business.

If he was flying, though? :P Then no, the TSA-issued blue ID card would not be sufficient for him to access the sterile area. Just like me. Just like I said earlier in this thread when I was talking to Ayn R Key and Yangj...something. I added a quick note that I bolded for clarity:

"Also interesting to note, since you mentioned NASA, the NASA ID cards aren't acceptable as forms of ID to entering into the sterile area anymore. :)

Also interesting to note, my own DHS badge [note: my TSA-issued government credential card] isn't acceptable either. Go figure."

And one more bonus photograph. Hi there!

Submitted by Tomas on
HSVTSO Dean said:
"It's all in the presentation, Tom. I've said multiple times that if someone asks nicely, I have no problem in the world whipping my wallet out and showing the credentials.

What I have a problem with is someone making an outright demand for it, and I'm not required to do whatever it is that they demand.

I'm American that way. Sue me."

Understandable, Dean, but then you CERTAINLY should understand the feelings generated when a TSO demands our ID before domestic travel, especially when such a demand is questionable under the circumstances, and has not yet been vetted by the courts.

Yeah, someone is sure to start squawking Gilmore v. Gonzales, but IIRC that was decided because there was an alternative of questioning and search if a person refused to show ID. This whole discussion started with the TSA removing that option by stating that when ID was demanded "the dog ate my ID" would be OK, but "I'd rather not" would be no flight.

I also understand to a small extent the being "selectively stopped" by LEOs because of an outward appearance, as I drive a vehicle that stands out and is aimed at a very young crowd (lightly customized original Scion xB), and officers often get flustered and end up not even asking for a driver's license after stopping me for some imaginary reason and finding someone their grandfathers age glaring at them from the drivers seat. :o\

HSVTSO Dean said:
"If Kip Hawley (or anyone else in TSA) was there at the airport on official business, then our TSA-issued blue ID card is enough to get us into and past the checkpoint for us to do our business.

If he was flying, though? :P Then no, the TSA-issued blue ID card would not be sufficient for him to access the sterile area."

Of course if Kip (or anyone else in TSA) were to get "past the checkpoint" they could fairly easily from that point wander away (head for the restroom?), pull out their un-shown boarding pass and climb aboard an aircraft, I would suspect...

Thanks for the pics, Dean, it makes it easier to speak to the other side as a human being. :o)

Please allow me to return the favor: Who's Tom?
Submitted by HSVTSO Dean on
Tomas wrote:
Understandable, Dean, but then you CERTAINLY should understand the feelings generated when a TSO demands our ID before domestic travel...

Naturally. Though I think you're interchanging 'require' for 'demand.'

While I have to require all passengers to show me their identification when I'm working at the travel documen podium, I never make a demand for it. I've always seen demands (particularly unjustified demands) as being presumptuous and hubris-filled, and why make a demand when you can just ask nicely for something, instead?

The same understanding makes me shake my head and normally release a groan when some TSO or non-TSO-pro-TSA person gets on here and starts getting asinine.

"IF U 4 NO LIKZ IT THEN DON'T FLYZ!!1!!one!!" isn't an appropriate response to... well, anything, really.

Of course if Kip (or anyone else in TSA) were to get "past the checkpoint" they could fairly easily from that point wander away (head for the restroom?), pull out their un-shown boarding pass and climb aboard an aircraft, I would suspect...

Yeah, but that's actually a whole bunch of people. Airport employees, for example, if they only show their SIDA badge to get through the airport can do the same thing. So can airline employees, for that matter - like a pilot or a sky waitress on a flight or something but not as a member of the crew (i.e.; not in uniform) can come through the checkpoint with only their airline ID and not have to show their boarding pass.

But that's still a discussion for a whole different thread. I was just dealing with the technicalities of what is supposed to be allowable versus what is not.
Submitted by Ayn R Key on

hsvtso,

So we are only required to show our ID, there is no demand that we show ID? That's a word game. Both words mean that it is mandatory, even if phrased in the form of a request. It is a requirement. When you say "pretty please with sugar on top show me your ID" it is a demand because you are a TSO.

Submitted by HSVTSO Dean on

Oh, Ayn R. Key. Let me try to spell this out one more time.

First off, it's not a word game. I never disputed the requirement to show ID (save only that I don't think it does very much to enhance the security of the process). I've said one thing very consistantly the entire time (seriously - scroll up and you'll find it!), and that is to ask nicely. The only thing I said about a demand is that it's rude and presumptuous.

Had the police officer who stopped me said something to the nature of "I need you to stand right over here while I search your vehicle, sir," I wouldn't have had a problem in the world doing what he wanted.

However, instead, he said "Stand right here and don't move." Which did nothing but spark my desire to thumb my nose at him.

It's not splitting hairs, and it's not semantics. It's the inherent difference between being polite and being rude, with nothing at all involved with the requirement to show identification.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Most of the super negative comments are coming from Anons so I decided to do the same but actually say something that makes sense. It is nothing but the truth when you say that everyone cannot be pleased. If TSA suddenly decided to give in and give the flying public what they wanted...(i.e. no more ID checks, no more secondary screening, no more checking your bags, or making you throw away your precious 20 oz. water/soda.) ...you would be the same people to moan and groan and complain about the lack of security when you want to fly. You will be the same people that would say that it was ridiculous or inappropriate that such an act was done. I agree with Bob on this one, if you have nothing to hide then what's the big deal?!? You show your ID to do just about anything in the United States, what's so hard about having to show your ID to freaking fly? Stop being big babies and just do us all a favor...do what they ask so WE don't have to stand behind you in line and watch you act like an idiot. We all have places to go just as you do.

Submitted by Phil on

Someone anonymously wrote:

"If TSA suddenly decided to give in and give the flying public what they wanted...(i.e. no more ID checks, no more secondary screening, no more checking your bags, or making you throw away your precious 20 oz. water/soda.) ..."

No one here is asking for that. If you truly disagree, please cite some examples.

I believe that most of us think checking bags for dangerous items is a fine policy. However, most of us know that checking ID is not useful for anything other than conducting unconstitutional dragnet operations, and that the banning of liquids unless they are separated into containers of less than 3.4 ounces is ridiculous. Both are a waste of our money, and the ID check amounts to a restriction of our right to travel without interference from the government. TSA have provided no reasoning for any of this.

"if you have nothing to hide then what's the big deal?"

Do you have curtains on your windows? Why -- do you have something to hide? Do you send love letters or financial and medical records on postcards? Why not -- do you have something to hide?

See also: Solove, Daniel J., "'I've Got Nothing to Hide' and Other Misunderstandings of Privacy" . San Diego Law Review, Vol. 44, p. 745, 2007

"You show your ID to do just about anything in the United States"

Maybe you do, but I don't. Could you please provide some examples?

Submitted by Phil on

Note that The Identity Project has, as of May, 2009, received via FOIA request placed June 21, 2008, a copy of TSA standard operating procedures related to the policy which is the topic of this blog post.

The SOP document contradicts what TSA has stated here on their blog. IDP writes:

The version of the SOP manual which the TSA has now made public is dated June 30, 2008, so it ought to reflect the changes announced in the TSA’s June 21, 2008 press release. But there is nothing at all in the sections of the manual the TSA has released about the new procedures and new ID verification form which the TSA had, in fact, started using. Rather than requiring people who don’t have or don’t choose to show government-issued ID credentials to execute affidavits stating who they are under penalty of perjury, the TSA procedures manual requires that such people be allowed to proceed through secondary screening as “selectees”, and specifically directs screeners and other TSA staff not to make any attempt to detain or delay them.

The TSA procedures manual states that the “Travel Document Checker” (TDC) must “ask to see” each person’s travel document. (”Travel document” appears to be used to mean “ticket” or “confirmation”, contrary to the international industry-standard usage of “travel document” to mean “passport or other ID”.)

The key words used are “ask” and “request”, not “demand”. The procedures further state:

If the individual’s identification documents remain suspect, the STSO [Screening Officer] must notify an LEO [law enforcement officer] for resolution….

Screening of the individual may proceed while waiting for an LEO response. If an LEO fails to respond within established airport timeframes, the STSO must process the individual as a selectee. If the individual clears selectee screening, do not attempt to detain or delay the individual from entering the sterile area for the purpose of obtaining LEO clearance….

Individuals who appear to be 18 years of age or older with a valid travel document, but without an ID, or in possession of an invalid ID, must be designated and screened as a selectee.Any detention, search, or interrogation by a law enforcement officer, of course, would be subject to well-established legal standards for warrant, probable cause, or sufficent basis for suspicion.

[...]

Contrary to TSA claims to have firm legal authority for their ID checking and other screening practices, this section of the TSA SOP manual suggests that the TSA knows that their authority is limited, and in particular does not extend to detention, general-puprose search, confiscation of documents, or compelled responses to interrogatories.--
Phil
Add your own questions at TSAFAQ.net

Submitted by Anonymous on

This doesn't say anything about the details of the new ID requirements. Does this guy get PAID by US to put out this drivel?

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