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Shoes on the X-ray belt, or in a bin???

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Thursday, May 14, 2009
shoes

Starting this week, officers will be asking passengers to put their shoes directly on the X-ray belt instead of in a bin at the checkpoint.
 

This will help to declutter bins and give officers a better view of shoes coming through, as well as everything else. Our officers are seeing some pretty packed bins with shoes, electronics, wallets and other items, and when they can’t get a good look, a cluttered bin is more likely to get pulled aside for additional screening. Nobody likes that.

 

If you don’t hear the directions or put your shoes in the bin by accident, fear not - you won’t be sent back to the end of the line for a do-over.

 

Safe travels!

Lynn

 

EOS Blog Team

Comments

Submitted by Anonymous on

So when the laces get wrapped around the rollers and the machine stops, will TSA reimburse passengers for damaged shoes? Your equipment, your rules, my shoes, your responsibility for damaging my property.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Lynn, why does TSA persist in lying to us by falsely claiming that shoes prevent some sort of a threat to aviation? No other country in the world mandates shoe removal at airport screening with no ill effects.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Since you say that citizens will only be "asked" to place shoes on the belt, I take it that those of us who choose to ignore this policy will not face any sort of punitive secondary screenings as a result?

Submitted by Anonymous on

I have a medical condition which prevents me from removing my shoes at airport checkpoints. Please describe what sort of screening I can expect from your employees to accommodate my medical condition.

Submitted by Jim Huggins on

Lynn,

Is TSA going to remove the picture from this page which shows shoes in a bin?

Submitted by Txrus on

Sorry, Lynn, but having been thru both LAX & ORD (all of 15 minutes ago, btw-I'm writing this from the Admiral's Club in T3), there is no 'asking' going on from your screeners. What we get is 'Shoes CANNOT go in the bins.' 'Shoes MUST be flat on the belt.' 'Take your shoes out of the bins'.

Once again, complete disconnect between what you say & what happens in the real world.

As far as 'decluttering' goes, then please explain why the other pair of shoes in my rollaboard, which is jammed enough cables to run a small country, a jacket, a stack of paperwork, & assorted other junk, didn't have to come out???

Finally, what will the TSA's policy be when someone's shoes are damaged after getting caught in the rollers while going thru? I guarantee you it's going to happen. Since the TSA is the one mandating this policy, how will you shift the blame onto the passenger this time?

Submitted by Lil-m-moses on

This seems like a great way for shoes to get tangled up in the strips at the front and back of the unit, caught on stuff inside the machine, and possibly even lost or mangled. I forsee a lot more delays related to stopping of the belt and operators having to reach inside and fish stuff out. Have any tests of this been done with a random assortment of shoes, from light-weight flip flops and strappy heels to big heavy workboots with long laces, all interspersed (and not) with bins and larger luggage?

Submitted by Groovymarlin on

For God's sake when can we stop taking our shoes off at the security checkpoint? This is my LEAST favorite aspect of the TSA checkpoints - yes, even more so than the stupid 3-1-1 liquids rule (though that's a close second). As another commenter noted, nowhere else in the world is this required. What's the deal?

Submitted by Anonymous on

You people must wear glass slippers like Cinderella to be that concerned about damage to your shoes. Your shoes are many times more likely to get damaged by walking then going through an Xray machine. Seriously you would have a hell of a time proving that the damage occured by the rollers and not normal everyday wear and tear that you never noticed

Submitted by Chris TSI-C on

Six comments, and six sarcastic, ill mannered, critical questions, that you want a civil reply to? Why is it that when you want to know something that it has to come with a big slice of anger and disdain. The post was trying to be informational. Lynn does not make policy. She is simply stating a fact. Lynn cannot change policy. She can simply try to answer your questions.

Somewhere TSA thought that this would be a good idea to get two differing sides engaging in a dialog to try to get help in understanding how the public sees what happens in TSA. Instead, it's the same 10-12 people that have nothing better to do than insult and rant. I came on here thinking I could give good insight to another aspect of the DHS perspective. I am an Inspector/Investigator, I was obviously mistaken and see why my colleagues stay away from this part of the intra-net.

Submitted by Lynn on

In response to:

Is TSA going to remove the picture from this page which shows shoes in a bin?Yes - already done. Thanks Jim.

Submitted by Lynn on

In reply to Anonymous:

I have a medical condition which prevents me from removing my shoes at airport checkpoints. Please describe what sort of screening I can expect from your employees to accommodate my medical condition.Thanks for the question - here's your answer:

There is an exception for passengers with disabilities, medical conditions, and prosthetic devices. These passengers do not have to remove their shoes, however, security officers will give them additional screening. This includes a visual and physical inspection as well as explosives trace detection sampling of the footwear while it remains on the passenger’s feet.

Lynn
EOS Blog Team

Submitted by Tomas on

Sorry, txrus, there ALWAYS seems to be a 'disconnect' between the words from the castle and the actions on the line.

I think we've actually gotten to expect that, at least I have.

I've learned to only expect/believe what I see in front of me.

Take care,
Tom (1 of 5-6)

Submitted by Anonymous on

Why are you only answering some questions and not others? Why are you afraid?
'

Submitted by Anonymous on

How does TSA plan to reimburse citizens whose property is destroyed or damaged when laces get caught in the works of the X-rays?

Why does TSA alone in the world insist on mandatory shoe removal?

Submitted by Alan on

How does this new "Shoe Policy" improve safety of commercial aircraft?

Are shoes no longer permitted in bins?

Are shoes permitted in carry-on bags?

Has TSA started screening everyone entering the secure area each time they enter?

Has TSA complied with the Congressional mandate to screen 100% of cargo loaded onto commercial passenger aircraft?

Has TSA developed a method to keep checked baggage secure after it has been inspected by the TSA?

Submitted by Miller on

Chris said:

omewhere TSA thought that this would be a good idea to get two differing sides engaging in a dialog to try to get help in understanding how the public sees what happens in TSA. Instead, it's the same 10-12 people that have nothing better to do than insult and rant. I came on here thinking I could give good insight to another aspect of the DHS perspective. I am an Inspector/Investigator, I was obviously mistaken and see why my colleagues stay away from this part of the intra-net.Chris, we've tried polite. We've tried being serious only to find that TSA isn't interested in a two way communication. Serious questions remain unanswered by TSA. Perhaps when TSA answers the questions the comments might self regulate.

Submitted by A Frequent Flier on

Just went through San Jose Security -- they made every person with shoes in the bin re-run the bag with the shoes on the conveyer belt. Kind of dumb because I had three paid of shoes in the carry on roller bag. And they made the line take twice as long because they were literally re-running EVERY bin and EVERY shoe that originally went through in a bib. Dumb.

Submitted by Earl Pitts on

Chris,

It's because TSA treats the general public with disdain and as the enemy.

If you want the public to respect TSA, then I suggest that TSA starts respecting the public and not like 3 year olds.

Are we upset? Darn right. We're tired of nonanswer answers and "just trust us" when we wask something. If these things are such threats, then surely the same threats exist elsewhere in the world. The US is not alone in being terror targets. Ask yourself this: if TSA is the only place in the world where some measures are conducted (like the shoe carnival), then can you explain why planes aren't falling out of the sky in countries where such practices aren't occurring?

TSA has done more to destroy aviation in this country than OBL ever could. He's laughing in a cave right now.

I can understand why a lot of TSA people avoid this blog: it shows that things aren't as rosy as TSA would like you to believe.

Earl

Submitted by Anonymous on
Anonymous said...

You people must wear glass slippers like Cinderella to be that concerned about damage to your shoes. Your shoes are many times more likely to get damaged by walking then going through an Xray machine. Seriously you would have a hell of a time proving that the damage occured by the rollers and not normal everyday wear and tear that you never noticed

May 14, 2009 4:00 PMI work around conveyors and have a healthy respect for them as one of my coworkers lost part of his thumb to one.
Submitted by Jim Huggins on

Chris TSI-C writes:

Six comments, and six sarcastic, ill mannered, critical questions, that you want a civil reply to?As one of those first six comments, I'm a bit offended. I wasn't being sarcastic; I simply pointed out a problem with the TSA website that was inconsistent with the new announcement. (An inconsistency, by the way, that Lynn agreed was a problem.)

Why is it that when you want to know something that it has to come with a big slice of anger and disdain. The post was trying to be informational. Lynn does not make policy. She is simply stating a fact. Lynn cannot change policy. She can simply try to answer your questions.Except that Lynn managed to get the website photo changed, in very short order. That doesn't sound ineffective to me.

Somewhere TSA thought that this would be a good idea to get two differing sides engaging in a dialog to try to get help in understanding how the public sees what happens in TSA. Instead, it's the same 10-12 people that have nothing better to do than insult and rant.You can't have a dialog if one party doesn't want to respond.

What tends to happen here is that a TSA official posts a topic, and then lots of members of the public respond and ask questions. Many of those questions go unanswered ... in fact most go unacknowledged. And so people think that they're being ignored, and ask the question again, and the question is unacknowledged. Repeat this cycle a few times, and you can understand why people might get cranky.

I came on here thinking I could give good insight to another aspect of the DHS perspective. I am an Inspector/Investigator, I was obviously mistaken and see why my colleagues stay away from this part of the intra-net.First of all, this isn't part of anyone's private intra-net; it's part of the public Internet.

Second, personally, I'd love to hear your perspective on the issues being discussed here. Some of your TSO colleagues here have been extremely helpful in furthering the dialog; the more help, the better.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Lynn, what steps is TSA taking to ensure that screeners in San Jose know that it is not a requirement to place shoes on the belt, since citizens are only being "asked" to do so?

Submitted by TSO-Joe on

"How does TSA plan to reimburse citizens whose property is destroyed or damaged when laces get caught in the works of the X-rays?"

Been doing this for 6+ years. Hasn't happened yet. If it does, I'll let you know. TSO-Joe

Submitted by Anonymous on

"Has TSA complied with the Congressional mandate to screen 100% of cargo loaded onto commercial passenger aircraft?"

Excellent question. Sadly, the Cargo blog is filled with questions like this that have no bearing on the topic at hand. Thanks for clogging another post.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Anonymous wrote:

"Lynn, why does TSA persist in lying to us by falsely claiming that shoes prevent some sort of a threat to aviation? No other country in the world mandates shoe removal at airport screening with no ill effects."

___________________________

That is simply not true. I flew in Amsterdam and Paris, France - both places I had to remove my shoes (and bulky clothing, like jackets, sweaters). In fact, I had to do everything there that I have to do here (the United States), such as remove my computer, liquids, etc...

Submitted by Anonymous on

Anonymous wrote:

I have a medical condition which prevents me from removing my shoes at airport checkpoints. Please describe what sort of screening I can expect from your employees to accommodate my medical condition.

___________________________

I have worked for TSA for about 3 years, and have screened many people with medical condition that requires they do not remove their shoe. What you should expect is to undergo a hand held medical detector if your medical condition allows it, and if not a full body pat-down. If you are screened using a HHMD that is followed by a more limited pat-down. All of which is followed by an ETD run on your hands and shoes while they remain on your feet.

I can tell you this, though. I can not tell by usually looking at someone if they have a medical condition, just as you most likely can't determine what medical condition I have by looking at me, usually. I have found the quickest way to get through is not to just simply say "I'm not going to remove my shoes", let the person at the walk-through metal detector know that you have a "medical condition". You do not need to tell them the nature of the condition; just stating that you have one and it prevents you from removing yours shoes should be enough.

TSO John

Submitted by GSOLTSO on

Anon sez - "Lynn, why does TSA persist in lying to us by falsely claiming that shoes prevent some sort of a threat to aviation? No other country in the world mandates shoe removal at airport screening with no ill effects."

Because shoes present a viable threat to aviation security - this has been addressed several times. Richard Reid is the biggest example, but there is other research and possibilities involved as well.

West
EOS Blog Team

Submitted by GSOLTSO on

Anon sez - "Since you say that citizens will only be "asked" to place shoes on the belt, I take it that those of us who choose to ignore this policy will not face any sort of punitive secondary screenings as a result?"

No punitive screening, but you may be delayed a bit while they are re-run through the xray.

West
EOS Blog Team

Submitted by GSOLTSO on

Anon sez - "I have a medical condition which prevents me from removing my shoes at airport checkpoints. Please describe what sort of screening I can expect from your employees to accommodate my medical condition."

If you are unable to remove your shoes due to medical reasons, we will have you process through like normal, and do some additional screening on the shoes and you. It should be fairly painless especially if the shoes have no metal in them. If you will talk to the TSO at the walk through or at the lane before coming through, they should be able to accomodate you without much problem at all. Please be more patient at the larger airports as they have a higher passenger volume, and the staffing will not allow for as much speed as you can expect at a smaller airport like here at GSO.

West
EOS Blog Team

Submitted by Trollkiller on

If laces are going to be a problem in the X-ray I suggest the TSA steals some food trays from the food court for people to put their shoes in. Low profile, should be no problem with the image.

That will be $5 please.

Submitted by Jannis on

Miller Said… Chris, we've tried polite. We've tried being serious only to find that TSA isn't interested in a two way communication. Serious questions remain unanswered by TSA. Perhaps when TSA answers the questions the comments might self regulate.

Earl Pitts said… If these things are such threats, then surely the same threats exist elsewhere in the world. The US is not alone in being terror targets. Ask yourself this: if TSA is the only place in the world where some measures are conducted (like the shoe carnival), then can you explain why planes aren't falling out of the sky in countries where such practices aren't occurring?

Most of the posts I have read on this blog are sent in by people who are only angry with TSA because security is stricter than it was before September 11, 2001. The reality of life in the 21st century is that the United States government has exactly two choices, 1) To make it citizens safer by increasing security (regardless of skeptical whining this is what TSA has done) or 2) To allow its citizens to die at the hands of radicals.

The choice is ours. Risk is a part of life and if we as Americans fully accept this fact then TSA can ease off their security measures. As I recall, in the days and weeks following 9-11 the American people rose up and demanded that the government protect them. This is why TSA was created. If you really want to get rid of TSA then you need to convince your fellow Americans that they should be willing to risk their lives so that you can wear your shoes through the checkpoint.

Submitted by Ldsman on

I have been working at an airport since August of 2001. I have never seen shoes, or parts of shoes, get damaged or get caught in the machine.
Other countries are quite willing to have armed soldiers in their airports ready to shot passengers who fail to comply with their commands. They have fewer civil liberties to worry about violating.

Some of these constant questions have been answered in previous posts. You didn't like the answers, so you continue to repost it. Others have absolutly nothing to do with the current topic and are ignored. A few aren't answered because TSA doesn't want to tell people what we are looking for because, if you know, you might try to circumvent security just to prove you can.
Most of the posters seem to be the same people with the same complaints asking the same questions and then complaining because the didn't like the answer. If the moderators here won't answer your questions or you are convinced that they are lying to you, WHY DO YOU KEEP COMING BACK? You all seem like gluttons for punishment.
7 year TSO(almost 8)

Submitted by LTSO With Answers on

Alan here are some answers to the questions you asked.

How does this new "Shoe Policy" improve safety of commercial aircraft?While there isn't a big change in the policy to increase security advantage, it does infact help security move faster. Shoes by their lonesome will help keep all your other items/bins cleaner and less cluttered and will help speed up the process. The more you pack into a bin the longer it takes to clear an item on the screen because it takes longer to distinguish what is what on the xray image. Let me also suggest that you put your shoes directly on the belt first and when you are waiting on the other side for the rest of your property you will be able to have your shoes back on your feet!

Are shoes no longer permitted in bins?The new policy is more of an advisement. Passengers want more uniformity and you are getting it by having a set way to place your shoes into the xray! If you place your shoes in a bin with nothing on top of them or underneath then the officer will be able to clear the shoes still. But why waste time grabbing a bin just for your shoes?

Are shoes permitted in carry-on bags?Shoes that are in carry-on bags can stay there. Nothing has changed but depending on how they look on xray in the carry-on could cause the officer to want to have another look at your bag.

Has TSA started screening everyone entering the secure area each time they enter?TSA screens every passenger entering the secure area. If by this you mean other employees then they are screened on a random basis. The direct access point screening has been piloted to 100% screening at various airports.

Has TSA complied with the Congressional mandate to screen 100% of cargo loaded onto commercial passenger aircraft?I am fairly certain this mandate is not in effect yet. I believe last I read it was mandated for 2010 and may of changed since then.

Has TSA developed a method to keep checked baggage secure after it has been inspected by the TSA?A lot of what people want with this secure checked baggage is operationally impossible. People complain that about the use of their tax dollars now and then you want to pour more tax dollars into something. I don't get it. When will people be happy? I already know people are going to say when TSA is not around but face the new age... TSA is around. The thing with secure checked baggage is not just relied on to TSA but also everyone else that has contact with the bags.

Submitted by Sandra on

It's internet, Chris, not intra-net.

Submitted by Anonymous on

The TSA folks who run this blog seem to take particular offense when someone points out an obvious flaw or inconsistency in their system that the Security Geniuses at Headquarters seem to have missed when they designed it. One of them relates to this new policy, requiring the shoes on our feet to be placed separately on the conveyor belt while (presumably) allowing any shoes in our carry-ons to remain there. That doesn't make a lot of sense to me either, but then a lot of things the TSA does don't make sense to me.

Their preferred way of dealing with people who point out obvious flaws is to just ignore them, in the hope that everyone else will ignore it as well and whoever posted it will just go away. Security is always more effective when you ignore the flaws. We can only hope that the terrorists ignore them too.

Or maybe the idea is to make stupid rules meant to catch stupid terrorists who stumble into the checkpoints. The smart terrorists will be intercepted by the BDOs well before the get to the checkpoints, as long as they're also carrying drugs.

Submitted by Anonymous on

How about shoes on our feet, where they belong, and where civilized countries allow us to leave them when we travel?

Submitted by NoClu on

Three posts in the first half of a month don't make this an interesting blog. Please pick up the pace.

One of the 5-6 or 10-12. I'm kinda confused.

Submitted by Lynn on

In response to Anonymous:

So when the laces get wrapped around the rollers and the machine stops, will TSA reimburse passengers for damaged shoes?

First, I would say that if you have shoes with laces, tuck them in before you put them on the belt to be safe. Of course there are no guarantees. We advise people to wear slip on shoes to speed their way through security, and that would help as well.

To answer your question, just as you could file a claim if your laptop were damaged on the belt, you could file a claim if your shoes were damaged.

Submitted by Lynn on

@txrus:

I've passed on your comment to our security operations office for their awareness. They confirmed that passengers are advised that they can put shoes directly on the belt, but they are not required to.

Thanks for letting us know about your experience.

Lynn
EOS Blog Team

Submitted by Anonymous on

This is ridiculous. Shoes present no threat to aircraft. We know it, you know it, and every time the TSA brain trust invents another pointless change in policy relating to shoes, you are lying to us.

So I'm done. I now have a medical condition that prevents me from taking off my shoes, too: I'm allergic to stupidity. And if I have to waste TSA's time so they can screen my shoes, which are as harmless as every other shoe that TSA gets the vapors over, good.

Submitted by Lynn on

@txrus - wanted to make sure you saw that I responded previously to an anonymous commenter's question about being comensated if a shoe or shoes get damaged on the belt. If that happens, you can file a claim just as you would if any other of your items were damaged during security.

Submitted by Miller on

Lynn, first of all thank you for answering the question. I am one of TSAs harshest critics and greatly appreciate your speedy answer.

Now one other question, you make a comment about slip on shoes speeding the security process. The shoe removal process was one I encountered before 9/11 (steel toed shoes) and as such is only a minor inconvenience. Red Wing doesn't, to the best of my knowledge make a pair of steel toed loafers/sandals so laces are a given. When will TSA drop the shoe screening since nowhere else in the world are shoes given the attention they are given here in the US. We also don't see aircraft dropping from the sky due to shoe bombs.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Lynn, are shoes more or less likely to get damaged in a bin or on a belt? Since shoes pose no risk to anyone, why does TSA want us to do something that could damage our shoes?

What will TSA do if a citizen's only pair of shoes is damaged irreparably by one of your machines?

Why is TSA obsessed with shoes people wear to the airport, but not shoes in carryon bags?

Submitted by Anonymous on

"They confirmed that passengers are advised that they can put shoes directly on the belt, but they are not required to."

What steps are you taking to make sure the airport breaking your policy stops doing so, then?

Submitted by RB on

Lynn said...
In response to Anonymous:

So when the laces get wrapped around the rollers and the machine stops, will TSA reimburse passengers for damaged shoes?

First, I would say that if you have shoes with laces, tuck them in before you put them on the belt to be safe. Of course there are no guarantees. We advise people to wear slip on shoes to speed their way through security, and that would help as well.

To answer your question, just as you could file a claim if your laptop were damaged on the belt, you could file a claim if your shoes were damaged.

May 15, 2009 3:53 PM
.....................
If shoes stayed on feet where they belong then all of this discussion would be for naught.

How many cases of exploding shoes has TSA uncovered?

If somewhere around 2 million people fly per day then that would be something just under 4 million shoes per day that are potential threats.

So what percentage of shoes presented for screening have been declared threats to the aircraft?

How many zeros after the decimal?

Submitted by Anonymous on

Great, another "suggestion" which will be rammed down our throats by power-tripping TSOs.

I regularly put my shoes and freedom-baggie in a bin, sometimes with my coat. I regularly stuff my cell phone and my watch into the shoes to make sure I don't forget them at the checkpoint. No way I'll put those small items in shoes that aren't in a bin. Other than a power-tripping TSO at HNL who wouldn't let my shoes into the x-ray with my phone in them, my shoes have never needed to be re-run or have secondary screening. Neither has the other pair of shoes in my rollaboard that usually has an electric razor, spare batteries, and sometimes an umbrella stuffed into the shoes.

TSA should be forced to compensate travelers who have their shoes damaged by this policy and compensate travelers who miss their flights due to delays caused by x-ray jams that occur due to this policy.

Submitted by Lynn on

@ Alan: here's some answers for you:

How does this new "Shoe Policy" improve safety of commercial aircraft? It gives officers a more clear view of shoes to ensure they haven't been tampered with. We've seen some cases where a family of four puts all their shoes in one bin, along with other items. Other times, people throw their jacket over their shoes. Officers need a clear view of them to clear them.

Are shoes no longer permitted in bins? No. We would rather have them directly on the belt, but it is not mandatory. I have seen the comments on the blog of people reporting being told they must take shoes out of the bin, and we've shared that info with our security operations office so they're aware.

Are shoes permitted in carry-on bags? Yes.

Has TSA started screening everyone entering the secure area each time they enter?No. We do continuous random employee screening at various times and various locations of the airport to inspect workers, their property and vehicles. These screening measures include ensuring workers follow proper access procedures when entering secure areas, display the appropriate credentials, and do not possess items unrelated to their work that may pose a security threat.

Airport employees receive a security threat assessment prior to receiving credentials and access privileges. Security threat assessments consist of a criminal history records check and vetting against terrorist watch lists, and are required for not only airport personnel but also individuals with access to public areas that possess airport credentials. This includes taxi drivers, parking lot attendants, vendors and shuttle bus drivers who have identification issued by the airport. It's not a one-time thing - they're perpetually vetted against watch lists.

Has TSA complied with the Congressional mandate to screen 100% of cargo loaded onto commercial passenger aircraft?The 9/11 Act includes requirements to screen 100% of cargo on passenger aircraft (50% by February 2009; 100% by August 2010). TSA met the February 2009 deadline. In addition, last October, TSA mandated screening of all cargo on narrow-body (one aisle) aircraft. These planes make up more than 95% of all U.S. flights – covering more than 85% of all U.S. passengers each day.

Has TSA developed a method to keep checked baggage secure after it has been inspected by the TSA?
I'll have to research that one and get back to you.

Thanks for your questions.

Submitted by Anonymous on

"It gives officers a more clear view of shoes to ensure they haven't been tampered with. We've seen some cases where a family of four puts all their shoes in one bin, along with other items. Other times, people throw their jacket over their shoes. Officers need a clear view of them to clear them. "

But shoes pose no threat to anyone, so why does TSA insist that citizens remove them in the first place?

Submitted by PDX Officer on

A note regarding "required" vs. "recommended":

We were first notified that shoes were going to be "required" to be run completely separately, and that was what we started enforcing. The word came down a day or two later that it was not "required" but "recommended". So that probably accounts for the disconnect there.

The reasoning being that the X-Ray operator needs to be able to clearly see the shoe in order to clear it successfully. Shoes are a known threat vector, as evidenced by Richard Reid and numerous drug smugglers. It's far from the only threat vector, but when we know that people want to smuggle things in shoes, and have in fact done so in the past, it makes no sense to allow someone to bring shoes into the sterile area without having them X-Ray screened. Of course, we could ETD every pair of shoes and let you leave them on your feet, but that would take at least 10 times as long as removing them and running them through the X-Ray, so I don't see that as being a viable alternative.

When the shoes are run in a tray with other items, *especially* when there are numerous items shoved inside the shoe (coins, keys, cell phones [p.s. Who wants to put their cell phone back to their head after they stuck it in their shoe? Really?], etc.) it becomes very difficult to tell if the shoes have been altered. We all know how badly TSA does on Red Team tests, a portion of that is because they hide things in shoes and them cover them up. The TSO doesn't spend the time to adequately check the shoes, and a threat is missed. However when shoes were run by themselves without any obstructions, the TSOs had a much higher success rate. It makes sense to make a small alteration to the policy to drastically increase the likelihood that a threat can be caught.

Submitted by Sunny on

It is more important to get better security, than worrying about damage to a pair of shoes. Shoes can be replaced. But life can not be replaced once it is lost. It is very important to cooperate with airport authorities, who are protecting us from terrorists.

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