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Camping, Hunting & Fishing Gear On a Plane

Wednesday, June 10, 2009
I received an e-mail from someone today asking about bear mace, and thought maybe I should write a blog post for all of you summer campers, hunters and fishermen out there. (And in case you didn’t know, bear mace is more effective than a gun, as bullet wounds usually just make bears more aggressive)

Summer is here and people are heading for the sticks. (Via a jetliner) You either like to rough it like me and pack nothing but a loincloth and flint & steel, or you go to your local sporting goods store and max out your card on all the latest camping gear .

So listed here are some popular camping items with a quick note as to whether or not you can take them on a plane: 

Animal repellants can go in your checked luggage if the volume is less than 4 ounces and its active ingredient is less than 2%. Bear Mace usually exceeds these limits. 

Camp Stoves can go in either your carry-on or checked bag. Oh yeah, you do have to empty the fuel first. (It has happened) 

Insect repellents that are sprayed on the skin are considered a personal use item and are permitted in carry-on (3-1-1 applies) and checked baggage. 

Insecticides that are used to kill little creepy crawlies (Ant killers, cockroach killers, spider killers etc) are prohibited altogether." 

Empty Gas Cylinders are allowed in checked or carry-on bags as long as the regulator valve is removed and we can see inside. 

Flare Guns are allowed in your checked baggage, but they have to be stored and declared just like a regular firearm . The flares are a no go and have to be purchased at your destination.

TSA allows fishing poles, but if you’re taking them as a carry-on, you might want to give your airline a ringy-dingy and see if the pole exceeds their carry-on limits. Tackle is OK as a carry-on, but just be sure that you don’t have any knives or large deep sea fishing hooks. Also, tools can’t be larger than 7 inches. 

Spear Guns. Umm…yeah Captain Nemo, these can’t go in the cabin, but you can check them in the belly of the plane. 

Bow & Arrows. See Spear guns… 

Guns & Ammo are allowed to be checked in the belly of the plane as long as you follow the proper procedures.  

Safety Matches are allowed in your carry-on luggage one pack per passenger per FAA safety regulations . Strike anywhere matches (I love to light those from my boot heel) are not allowed at all. 

Lighters were once banned, but are now permitted in your carry-on as of August, 2007. Torch lighters are still prohibited. 

Hatchets and Survival Knives are permitted in your checked baggage, but not permitted in your carry-on.

If you’re planning on participating and camping out at a renaissance festival this summer, we ask that you kindly not carry your broadsword through the checkpoint. Suits of armor are also frowned upon. Did they have jets in the renaissance period?

I hope you have a great time this summer! 

Blogger Bob
TSA Blog Team 

***Update 6/11 @ 3:20 PM*** 

The original line that read “Bug Spray along with insecticides are not allowed in your checked or carry-on bags” has been edited to: 

Insect repellents that are sprayed on the skin are considered a personal use item and are permitted in carry-on (3-1-1 applies) and checked baggage. 

Insecticides that are used to kill little creepy crawlies (Ant killers, cockroach killers, spider killers etc) are prohibited altogether. 

Bob Burns
TSA Blog Team

Comments

Submitted by Anonymous on

Hello -

Are water purification drops allowed in carryons or checked bags? Specifically, Aquamira drops? I don't believe them to be flammable or such, just strong enough to kill bacteria and viruses, etc.

Thanks for the help.

Submitted by Dunstan on

"Empty Gas Cylinders are allowed in checked or carry-on bags as long as the regulator valve is removed and we can see inside."
Wow! Limits to the carry-on paranoia!
See inside a gas bottle? Clear plastic water bottles are beyond your current suspect limit. Never mind baby food, cosmetics, wires, snacks and other suspect items; is some new training finally taking hold? Funding from the Energy lobby? Is somebody sending you some FDA approved sensibility medication?

Submitted by Anonymous on

Bob, you might want to mention that several of these rules are FAA safety regs, not TSA restrictions.

Submitted by A Different Phil on
Suits of armor are also frowned upon.

Is "frowned upon" a legally binding term? Does "frowned upon" equate to "disallowed"?
Submitted by Trollkiller on

Are gasoline stoves that have been used, but are empty, allowed?

Submitted by Anonymous on

a quick note on this, check out those small survival gear packs for when you are lost (usually a small pouch that can fit in your pocket with small stuff like a needle/thread, matches, TP and maybe small blades)
The blades can go checked, not in carryons

Submitted by Anonymous on

Is giving information "frowned upon", I hope not. Thanks to anonymous for pointing out that some of these are FAA Regulations. It is good to know that you do not walk around with your boots, lighting matches on a power trip.

Submitted by Bob on

Good morning. You must have missed the link in the article that says "per FAA safety regulations." Click on it and it takes you to an FAA PDF file.

Maybe I should have said I light the matches off of the heel of my wingtips? Power trip? Sheesh...

Submitted by Bob on

Gas stoves that have been used must be completely empty and not emitting any fumes.

Submitted by Bob on

Drops such as Aquamira are fine as long as they are in a 3.4 oz or less sized container. I think Aquamira makes 2 oz bottles. Or you could pack a larger bottle in your checked luggage.

Submitted by RB on

Bob, is it ok for some airport/airline employee to take my handgun around security, returning it to me at the airplane?

Seems you don't want to talk about this failure of TSA to screen all who enter the secure areas of airports.

This post conforms to stated posting guidelines and is on topic for allowed hunting items.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Dunstan said...

"Empty Gas Cylinders are allowed in checked or carry-on bags as long as the regulator valve is removed and we can see inside."
Wow! Limits to the carry-on paranoia!
See inside a gas bottle? Clear plastic water bottles are beyond your current suspect limit. Never mind baby food, cosmetics, wires, snacks and other suspect items; is some new training finally taking hold? Funding from the Energy lobby? Is somebody sending you some FDA approved sensibility medication?"

-------------------------------

Yet there seems no limits to how rude some of the people on here can be.

But the amazing is people who post like this somehow self-justify this behavior (TSA made me act this way!).

Submitted by Anonymous on

Trollkiller said...

"Are gasoline stoves that have been used, but are empty, allowed?"

Yes they are.

But on another note, I did have to tell one man he couldn't bring his chainsaw as carry-on luggage; it was fine as check-in luggage. He argued there was no gas, so it didn't violate the liquid policy. It was battery powered. Offered to turn it on to show me.

Submitted by Anonymous on

RB said...
Bob, is it ok for some airport/airline employee to take my handgun around security, returning it to me at the airplane?

Seems you don't want to talk about this failure of TSA to screen all who enter the secure areas of airports.


No, RB, it is not okay. That is why the airline employee and his roommate are under FBI investigation. TSA did not fail here; know the facts before you spout off.

Submitted by Hannah on

Hi Bob - Thanks for your informative blog. Could you address whether or not climbing gear is allowed, and whether it should go in carry on or checked bags? I once was asked to check a bag containing several carabiners - this occurred in another country and there was some communication difficulty, but the security person seemed to be worried that a carabiner could be used like brass knuckles. I've never had a similar problem traveling in the states, but have heard stories from others who have.

Thanks!

Submitted by RB on

No, RB, it is not okay. That is why the airline employee and his roommate are under FBI investigation. TSA did not fail here; know the facts before you spout off.

June 11, 2009 11:35 AM


TSA is mandated by regulation to screen everyone who enters the secure area.

In this case if they screened the airport worker they missed they weapon and failed.

If they did not screen the airport worker then they failed for not screening all who enter the secure area.

Any way you slice it up this was a failure of airport security which is TSA's responsibility.

Now if I am missing some important point here perhpas you will enlighten all of us.

Submitted by Anonymous on

BEWARE BUG SPRAY! Are you kidding! Have you ever been to Florida in the Summer!? I can't bring my own bug spray! Come on TSA. Come to your senses.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Anonymous said...
BEWARE BUG SPRAY! Are you kidding! Have you ever been to Florida in the Summer!? I can't bring my own bug spray! Come on TSA. Come to your senses.

--

Because it's flammable. And that's an FAA safety requirement, not TSA. Think before you speak.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Actually, no, airport security is the airport's responsibility. Passenger security is TSA's responsibility. How many airport workers have YOU seen clearing security? They get whatever background check the airport deems appropriate and that's pretty much it. TSA deals with people getting on a plane...not the ones loading a plane, flying a plane or checking passengers in for a plane. You REALLY need to get your facts straight RB...and petition Congress to mandate that ALL airport workers get fully and completely screened each and every day, at any time that they come anywhere near a secure or sterile area. Or haven't you read all the articles that have been written about this huge, glaring hole in the airport security system? Seriously...everything is not TSA's fault.

Submitted by Anonymous on

BEWARE BUG SPRAY! Are you kidding! Have you ever been to Florida in the Summer!? I can't bring my own bug spray! Come on TSA. Come to your senses.
___________________________________

Did you know that down if Florida where they have all of these bugs, they sell bug spray. Thats right, you can just walk into a store, just like any other state in the US and buy bug spray when you get there. Come on passenger, come to your senses!

Submitted by IAH Flyer on

Bob,

Come and join us for a backcountry trip. We do carry more than a loincloth, flint and steel, but all that we need is carried on our backs.

I am confused about bug spray. I thought that if it was intended to be sprayed on one's skin, then it was permitted to the same extent as other liquids.

Submitted by Anonymous on

About the bug spray - I could be wrong, but perhaps what they're worried about being flammable is the kind in the aerosol can (i.e., flammable propellant)? I would guess that a pump spray would be better. Or even better, a lotion based repellent.

Submitted by IAH Flyer on

I just looked on my 1.1 oz. non-aerosol bottle of 100% DEET and there is no mention of flammability.

If this is prohibited, then it should be mentioned on the list of prohibited items on TSA.gov

Submitted by RB on

Blog Team: If this is a duplicate please delete

.....................
Anonymous said...
Actually, no, airport security is the airport's responsibility. Passenger security is TSA's responsibility. How many airport workers have YOU seen clearing security? They get whatever background check the airport deems appropriate and that's pretty much it. TSA deals with people getting on a plane...not the ones loading a plane, flying a plane or checking passengers in for a plane. You REALLY need to get your facts straight RB...and petition Congress to mandate that ALL airport workers get fully and completely screened each and every day, at any time that they come anywhere near a secure or sterile area. Or haven't you read all the articles that have been written about this huge, glaring hole in the airport security system? Seriously...everything is not TSA's fault.

June 11, 2009 1:46 PM

..............................

Just a snippet from:

Title 49 §1540.107

Submission to screening and inspection.

(a) No individual may enter a sterile area or board an aircraft without submitting to the screening and inspection of his or her person and accessible property in accordance with the procedures being applied to control access to that area or aircraft under this subchapter.


I see nothing that seperates passengers and airport workers.

All must be screened equally.

If you have something that supports your conclusion that TSA is not responsible for the airport or the airport workers then post it.

Seems Congress should be the ones asking questions of DHS.

Submitted by Bob on

In reference to the bug spray, I just made the following update on the blog post. Thanks!

Insect repellents that are sprayed on the skin are considered a personal use item and are permitted in carry-on (3-1-1 applies) and checked baggage.

Insecticides that are used to kill little creepy crawlies (Ant killers, cockroach killers, spider killers etc) are prohibited altogether.

Bob

TSA Blog Team

Submitted by IAH Flyer on

Bob,

Thanks for the clarification on the bug spray.

Now another question. You state the limit as one pack for matches, but no mention is made for limitations on the number of lighters. However, the FAA document you link to states that only one lighter is permitted. I wasn't aware of this restriction.

If you are like me, I carry two Bic lighters for backpacking in case one fails. And I would think that smokers would also carry a back-up.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Didn't the FAA have a set of perfectly good rules and regulations detailing what was allowed on board the aircraft prior to 9/11? Most of what's been talked about clearly falls under the older FAA regulations.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Wow, this dance is so complicated. I can't think of anywhere I'd want to fly commercially that is worth the trouble. All the rules, regulation, personnel problems the airline traveler faces just to go somewhere to relax!

Posh! Alternatives look some much better. Good luck to all those that have to deal with the government people!

Submitted by Anonymous on

Ah, but we all have to remember that the FAA is not the TSA, so therefore any good solution or ruling created by the FAA will not be tolerated by the TSA.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Just another snippet from: § 1544.201 (b) EXCEPT AS PROVIDED IN ITS SECURITY PROGRAM, each aircraft operator must ensure that each individual entering a sterile area at each preboard screening checkpoint for which it is responsible (etc.)...... You may want to take a gander at all of 1542 where it discusses all the background checks airport personnel have to go through and all the biometric security that's provided to ensure that ONLY those with a background check who work at the airport are BY-PASSING SECURITY. Honestly...when was the last time you stood in the security line with the same Delta rep. who takes your ticket before you board a plane? Unless you were at an airport with no SIDA or AOA, the answer is never. Why? Because they don't get screened unless they fly! The airport they work for is responsible for ensuring the reliability of its employees (and yes, this includes cleaning crews, restaurant personnel and airline employees) through these background checks. Which is why, when they pay them barely more than minimum wage, you get people who are willing to risk their job for a buddy and take their firearm around security. It didn't get missed because they circumvented security or because TSA failed in something. The airport hired this person, told them the rules (which includes "don't bring ANY items around security for a passenger), and expected them to follow them. They didn't and they're fired and hopefully facing jail time. The end. There's nothing more to it. Sorry to disappoint you and all your dreams of TSA finger-pointing, but sometimes people are careless or dishonest, and should never be trusted. And yet, the airports are continuing to be allowed to grant unescorted access to unscreened people, pay them a pittance, and expect them to be moral and upstanding and follow all the rules out of a sense of duty...with virtually no safety net in place to ensure they do. I get the impression that there are a lot of people out there like you, RB, who truly think everyone is getting screened...do your homework and really study up on it. Look through the articles from the reputable papers and magazines. You'll be shocked to your toes at how MUCH freedom these airport workers have to do whatever they want....and how much of that they actually do (drug smuggling in a South Florida airport ring any bells?)

Submitted by Anonymous on

Anonymous said...
Ah, but we all have to remember that the FAA is not the TSA, so therefore any good solution or ruling created by the FAA will not be tolerated by the TSA.

You're assuming the FAA is doing the proper thing, because of course their oversight of regional airlines is top notch, right? No mistakes there, right?

Besides, they now focus on aviation safety vs TSA and security, which are two related things, but they're not the same.

Submitted by John on

In addition to the FAA, you need to chekc with your airline. They can choose to be more restrictive when carrying HAZMAT or items that held HAZMAT (fuel bottles / propane tanks).

They may choose not to carry them even if they are empty.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Anonymous said...

"Wow, this dance is so complicated. I can't think of anywhere I'd want to fly commercially that is worth the trouble. All the rules, regulation, personnel problems the airline traveler faces just to go somewhere to relax!

Posh! Alternatives look some much better. Good luck to all those that have to deal with the government people!"

________________________________


Thanks! This made me laugh.

I simply can not imagine the type/kind of person who finds airport travel difficult, except those who have a hard time opening a can of peanuts.

Submitted by Anonymous on

RB said...

"Blog Team: If this is a duplicate please delete

.....................
Anonymous said...
Actually, no, airport security is the airport's responsibility. Passenger security is TSA's responsibility. How many airport workers have YOU seen clearing security? They get whatever background check the airport deems appropriate and that's pretty much it. TSA deals with people getting on a plane...not the ones loading a plane, flying a plane or checking passengers in for a plane. You REALLY need to get your facts straight RB...and petition Congress to mandate that ALL airport workers get fully and completely screened each and every day, at any time that they come anywhere near a secure or sterile area. Or haven't you read all the articles that have been written about this huge, glaring hole in the airport security system? Seriously...everything is not TSA's fault.

June 11, 2009 1:46 PM

..............................

Just a snippet from:

Title 49 §1540.107

Submission to screening and inspection.

(a) No individual may enter a sterile area or board an aircraft without submitting to the screening and inspection of his or her person and accessible property in accordance with the procedures being applied to control access to that area or aircraft under this subchapter.


I see nothing that seperates passengers and airport workers.

All must be screened equally.

If you have something that supports your conclusion that TSA is not responsible for the airport or the airport workers then post it.

Seems Congress should be the ones asking questions of DHS."

********************************

Ok, RB, I think I see the problem here. You simply misunderstand what you post.

Specifically, you seem to have a problem with the passage that reads: "in accordance with the procedures being applied to control access to that area or aircraft". I have to ask, what procedure? There are actually several procedures. TSA SOP and AOP.

Most of you are more familiar with TSA SOP. However, AOP (Airport Operating Procedure) allows certain employees at the airport, not all, the freedom of movement between the non-sterile and sterile area through a “back door”. This was how the gun was handed off. All that is required for this access is to have the proper identification, which is NOT issued by TSA but by the airport police department, and the employee must currently be on their shift. They do not have this access on their time off.
Usually ticket counter employees of the various airlines have this access, but not all, and almost always the managers of the airlines have this access as well. The police department specifically limits how many of these types of badges they issue. Other airport employees who do not have these types of badges must go through the TSA checkpoint.
However, when one of these employees is flying they must submit to TSA screen, per both TSA SOP and AOP. Neither TSA SOP nor AOP allows employees with this kind of access to use their access to by-pass security for their friends or family, as happened in the case you submitted.
So to answer your question, PROCEDURE allows specific employees access to the sterile area without going through a TSA checkpoint. Remember, as you cited “in accordance with the procedures being applied to control access to that area or aircraft”, some people have access to the sterile area BY procedure. What you cited does not mean, as you claim, that everyone must be screened.

And as to your claim that "all must be screened equally", what if PROCEDURE states that all do NOT have to be screened equally? (Hint, this might be the case.) Not that you have to agree with it, or think its right.

The person you responded to is correct. If you don't like this, you should try to get it changed. And Congress is your best bet.

I tried to be very brief. If I need to explain further, please post so, and I will try.

I hope this helps.

Submitted by Dunstan on

This comment has been removed by the author.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Last week I submitted a comment for a separate blog on the incident in PHL, but my comment was never posted. If the report is accurate then the TSA failed to kept the sterile area secure from the introduction of a firearm. That subject alone is far more important than bringing strike anywhere matches on board.

Frank
BOS

Submitted by RB on

The person you responded to is correct. If you don't like this, you should try to get it changed. And Congress is your best bet.

I tried to be very brief. If I need to explain further, please post so, and I will try.

I hope this helps.

June 12, 2009 2:24 PM

........................
I think the real question is who is tasked with Aviation Security at this nations airports.

Is the airport FSD responsible for who and how anyone accesses the secure area?

If it is TSA then they can delegate processes but not responsibility.

My readings tell me that Congress gave the TSA responsibility for the security actions at airports served by commercial passenger carrying aircraft.

So is TSA responsible for security or not?

If TSA is incapable of screening everyone which is what the regs say they are required to do then why is TSA being sent to places they do not belong like political conventions and other large gatherings?

It would be my opinion and that of most civilians that the PHL incident is a TSA failure.

I will send another message off to my congressmen. I'm sure they are eager for another question about TSA foul ups. I would like them to explain why I have to be "Strip Search" while airport workers can carry guns onto the ramp.

This is not a favorable happening for TSA regardless of who is doing what!

And the silence from TSA and the Blog Team supports my conclusion that TSA failed again, this time in a major way!

Submitted by Daren Lewis on

Bob, Can you add the info on inflatable life jackets to the post.... we don't want the fisherman to drown when they get to their destination. Thanks!

Submitted by TSO Jacob on

TSA’s responsibility is to ensure that security procedures are being followed; this does NOT include the physical screening of every airport/airline employee who enters a secured area. The regulations and procedures do NOT say that TSA must physically screen all personnel that enter the area; it only states that individuals must submit to screening in accordance with the procedures being applied.

In every airport I have worked at, the procedures being applied are background checks with random physical inspections. TSA expanded the random physical checks that are performed on airport/airline employees, however, all employees are not physically screened every time they enter.

The incident in which an airport employee violated the security procedures, was caught, will be fired, and will probably do jail time, demonstrates a hole in security. It does NOT demonstrate a failure by TSA. It does demonstrates the failure of Congress and the American people to demand that this loophole in security be closed regardless of the heartburn it will cause the dedicated and honest employees that will be effected.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Anon said:BEWARE BUG SPRAY! Are you kidding! Have you ever been to Florida in the Summer!? I can't bring my own bug spray! Come on TSA. Come to your senses.

I have seen this issue arise from so many people on here and I wonder why you haven't figured out that you can get things AT your destination too. You can get things from places other than where you are flying from. If Florida is so bad with the bugs in the summer, don't you think they would make a killing off "selling" bug spray right there in Florida?!!!!! Either you guys don't use your brain to figure stuff like this out -or- you just have nothing better to do than nit pick at the stupidest crap!!! I'm gonna go with option number 2. It kills me how much people just love to complain.

Submitted by Anonymous on

RB said...

I think the real question is who is tasked with Aviation Security at this nations airports.

Is the airport FSD responsible for who and how anyone accesses the secure area?

If it is TSA then they can delegate processes but not responsibility....


...So is TSA responsible for security or not?


...And the silence from TSA and the Blog Team supports my conclusion that TSA failed again, this time in a major way!"


As to your last claim that a supposed silence from TSA and the Blog Team supports your conclusions is simply foolish. There are many reason I can think of to ignore you, none of which fall into your "conclusion" category.

You asked who is responsible for airport security, is the FSD responsible for access to the secure area, and stated they can delegate "delegate processes but not responsibility.""

Somehow you are assuming that TSA is the sole entity for avaition security in this nation, and that TSA has delegated part of this duty. That assumption is incorrect, no matter what you think you have read.

The FSD is not the only one responsible for who has access to the secure area of an airport. By TSA SOP and AOP there is overlapping responsibility established the moment TSA was established.

Ok, to explain, cause this might cause confusion. As a TSA employee I have 2 badges I must wear. Ask to see them next time your traveling.

One badge is a blue Transportation Security Administration/DHS badge. It has my TSA identification number on it. This badge does specify the employees home airport, but is basically valid nation wide. This will get me into TSA checkpoints and in baggage areas, but it is a bit more complicated than that. What if the baggage area is inside the secure area and I don't have secure area access?

The other badge is the airport badge, usually issued by the airport police or issuing authority, and grants access to the secure side of the airport. The right to issue this badge was never, never the authroity of TSA. It was not delegated way. IT was never TSA's authority do do so. This falls under AOP.

This airport badge is generally referred to as a SIDA badge. TSA has no say in who these badges are issued to. The airport police issues these badges after conducting whatever background check they do. They are airport specific, and not valid at any other airport.

What TSA CAN do is randomly validate these badges on the secure side. We stop employees and check to see if their airport badge is current, that the employee displays the badge. That is it. And again, it was never never TSAs authority to issue these badges, ever.

To be clear, the airport badge is what grants access to the secure side of the airport. Some badges allow access only by going through the TSA checkpoint. Some by allowing an employee (airline usually) access through the "back door".

Ok, once more. The TSA/DHS badge that TSA issues - and the only one TSA issues - does NOT allow access to the secure area. The airport badge does allow access to the secure area. By the way, as a TSA employee, while I am in the secure area of the airport, I HAVE to display my airport badge or I am not allowed. My TSA/DHS badge will NOT allow me this access.

Obviously, TSA is responsible for what comes through the checkpoint and baggage areas.

But if a person has a badge that allows them access through a back door, that is because the police or issuing authority have given them access, in accordance with AOP. And I can not state it enough - TSA did not delegated this authority away. TSA never had that authority. And since TSA never had that authority, well, how do you give away what you dont have?

So as to your question regarding TSAs role in security, both TSA and the airport police are responsible. There is over-lapping responsibility.

Submitted by Anonymous on

RB said...

"If TSA is incapable of screening everyone which is what the regs say they are required to do then why is TSA being sent to places they do not belong like political conventions and other large gatherings?"

TSA is hired to so do.

I attended "large gathering" Obama was to speak at. The U.S. Secret Service hired TSA, and paid for TSA out of their budget. When the Captain of the uniformed division of the S.S. spoke to our group he said we were needed because the S.S. was short handed. He said political campaigns were becoming longer and longer, and they simply didn't have the manpower to do what they needed to do. At the time he said most of the people on his unit had been away from home for close to 18 months.

But nice of you to not only tell TSA what it should and shouldn't do, now your doing so to the Secret Service. Wow.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Anonymous said:
Posh! Alternatives look some much better. Good luck to all those that have to deal with the government people!

So basically what you're saying is that you don't like living in you're house, having the ability to feed yourself as well as you're children. Having the permission to live in this United States of America.


Doesn't matter if it's people or organizations you actually have to thank or atleast live with the fact that most of the things or permissions granted to you are based off the government.

You should clarify on Gov't people. TSA in general, DHS, DOJ, DOI, DOA, FBI, CIA, NSA?

If it wasn't for some of these agencies like the CIA or NSA we really wouldn't have notice of terror threats. So be happy.

Submitted by Anonymous on

According to FAA and our documentation, if the stoves have been used, they cannot go in the carry on or checked baggage. That is per the air carrier and FAA regs due to flammability of the FUMES left in the containers. Can you verify this? In the meantime, used lanterns and camp stoves are not permitted on board aircraft.

Submitted by Anonymous on
Doesn't matter if it's people or organizations you actually have to thank or at least live with the fact that most of the things or permissions granted to you are based off the government.

We should thank our leaders every day for the permissions granted us. "...Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed...", Aren't we glad that idea is passe?

If it wasn't for some of these agencies like the CIA or NSA we really wouldn't have notice of terror threats. So be happy. Yes, if it wasn't for their diligence, aircraft may have hit the WTC in New York killing thousands... Sure, be happy. ;o)
Submitted by Irish on

Some Anonymous Soul Responding to Some Other Anonymous Soul (geez, can't you guys give yourselves numbers or something?) said...

"So basically what you're saying is that you don't like living in you're house, having the ability to feed yourself as well as you're children. Having the permission to live in this United States of America."

Maybe I'm not getting what you're saying, but I don't need "permission" to live in this United States of America. I'm a natural born citizen of this United States of America. I'm entitled to live in this United States of America. Not only am I entitled to live here, "the government" cannot force me (absent a conviction for treason) to leave against my will.

This isn't the Soviet Union (yet). We don't exile our citizens.

Irish

Submitted by Jim Huggins on

Anonymous writes:

I wonder why you haven't figured out that you can get things AT your destination too. You can get things from places other than where you are flying from. If Florida is so bad with the bugs in the summer, don't you think they would make a killing off "selling" bug spray right there in Florida?!!!!!

Of course ... and that reason is exactly why people object. When I can buy a six-ounce bottle of bug spray for $5 at home, why should I have to pay $10 for a three-ounce bottle in Florida? Why should I have to pay $1 for a bottle of water inside an airport, when I can get the same bottle of water at my local store for $0.20?

Ok, in the grand scheme of things, this isn't the end of the world. But for people who travel all the time, this kind of expense can add up. Which is why airline employees are exempt from many of the LGA regulations, because "it wouldn't be fair" to them to make them buy all the overpriced stuff that the rest of us passengers have to buy.

Simply put, the LGA policy costs passengers money. Maybe that cost is justified because of the threat that LGAs present; maybe not. That's a matter for wiser heads than I to decide.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Bob, Can you add the info on inflatable life jackets to the post.... we don't want the fisherman to drown when they get to their destination. Thanks!
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You people act like they only sell the things you need in your home town. Life jackets should be fine to carry if needed, but if not, who cares buy/rent them when you get there.
Another example, people complain about sunscreen and that they can't carry it because they are going to burn when they get in the hot hot sun. I bet if the weather is hot, they sell it where you are going.
In conclusion the sad stories about fisherman drowning and children burning because of TSA is stupid.

Submitted by Kellymae81 on

Jim Huggins said:Why should I have to pay $1 for a bottle of water inside an airport, when I can get the same bottle of water at my local store for $0.20?

I will have to say that I agree with you 100% that the way airports jack up the prices is outrageous. Unfortunately, if you want a bottle of water after security and before boarding the plane (where water is free I think, not sure) then you are going to pay the price. TSA has no control over what the airport stores choose to charge people, but I want to give you an alternate solution. You can bring an empty bottle thru security and then fill it up at the fountains -or- you can ask for cups at the restaurants and fill those up. You don't have to be victim to $2 bottled water charges.

To some of the other things, like the bug spray, you can't really do much there. I highly doubt that there is really a huge difference in the price between where you are and what they will charge you where you go, thats its worth taking the energy to get mad about it. Unfortunately, the policies in place are there and you just have to do what you can. The frontline of TSA is here to enforce these policies but we are also here to help. If you have questions while going thru security, most TSOs will gladly answer them for you and hopefully make your future trips thru security a little less stressful.

Kelly
TSA Blog Team

Submitted by Anonymous on

"Of course ... and that reason is exactly why people object. When I can buy a six-ounce bottle of bug spray for $5 at home, why should I have to pay $10 for a three-ounce bottle in Florida?"

Where is Forida are you going? You can't be that far away from a Wal-mart or K-mart...

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