USA Flag

Official website of the Department of Homeland Security

Transportation Security Administration

TSA SPOT Program: Still Going Strong

Archived Content

Please note that older content is archived for public record. This page may contain information that is outdated and may not reflect current policy or programs.

If you have questions about policies or procedures, please contact the TSA Contact Center.

Members of the news media may contact TSA Public Affairs.

Friday, May 21, 2010
TSA logo

The Screening of Passengers by Observation Techniques (SPOT) program has come a long way since I first blogged about it back in 2008. As of May 2010, about 3,000 Behavior Detection Officers (BDO) have been deployed at 161 airports nationwide.

For those of you not familiar with the SPOT program, BDOs are trained to detect behaviors that one exhibits in response to the fear of being discovered. In layman’s terms, BDOs look for behaviors that show you’re trying to get away with something you shouldn’t be doing. If you’re one of those travelers that gets frazzled easily (not hard to do at airports), you have no reason to worry. BDOs set a baseline based on the normal airport behavior and look for behaviors that go above that baseline. So if you’re stressing about missing a flight, that’s not a guaranteed visit from the BDOs.

Paul Ekman (PhD) is a Professor Emeritus at UC Davis and assisted in the development of the program. He’s been studying behavioral analysis for the past 40 years and has taught the TSA, Customs and Border Protection, CIA, FBI and other federal agencies to watch for suspicious facial expressions of tension, fear or deception. He has even taught animators at Disney-Pixar to create convincing faces for film characters. The SPOT program is a derivative of other behavioral analysis programs that have been successfully employed by law enforcement and security personnel both in the U.S. and around the world. TSA actually consulted and still regularly consults with several well respected behavior scientists when developing SPOT.

TSA deployed SPOT as an added layer of security to help deter and detect terrorists attempting to outsmart or circumvent the aviation security system. The program allows our officers to push security out in front and behind the checkpoint.

Our BDOs have identified illegal activities that have resulted in over 1,800 arrests at transportation systems across the country - most notably spotting an individual who was discovered to have explosive components at the Orlando airport in 2008.

We are aware of a new GAO report on our SPOT program. GAO’s recommendations are helpful as we continue to refine our procedures as the science and the program matures.

On a side note, I was a trained BDO in my airport days and personally feel the training I received was extremely valuable to security. Also, my wife, kids and used car salesmen are not able to get one over on me.

Bob Burns
TSA Blog Team

Comments

Submitted by Anonymous on

Now that you've put lipstick on the pig, time to kiss up to the GAO.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Over 1800 arrests, great, but how many convictions did those arrests lead to? If it's substantially lower (especially compared to the ratio of arrests to convictions for law enforcement in general), there's a reasonable assumption that this is a bad program.

Of course, this figure will not be released, and this comment will not be addressed. I'm familiar with how this blog works...

Submitted by Sandra on

You and TSA live in a dream world, don't you, Bob?

The program is a sham and nothing TSA says can change that.

Your last paragraph was totally inappropriate. This waste of our money by the TSA is nothing to joke about.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Are passengers required to answer inquiries from BDOs (or TSOs for that matter)?

Can a passenger's silence or refusal to answer questions from BDOs be used as justification to send them to retaliatory, uh, I mean secondary, secreening?

Can a passenger's slience or refusal to answer questions from BDOs be used as justification to refuse to allow them to exercise their liberty to fly without harassment or interference from the government?

Of the 1800 arrests resulting from BDO referral, how many involved passengers who intended to do harm to aviation? How many involved passengers who were carrying WEI (obviously at least one, the MCO case mentioned)?

Submitted by Anonymous on

Most of the BDO's that have crossed my path are arrogant and rude.

When I can be convinced that they do something more than drink coffee, glare at pax, and carry their oh so special clipboards around, then I'll think they are doing something worthwhile.

2 weeks classroom and 40 OJT does not make a profiler.

Submitted by Bob Hanssen on

"We are aware of a new GAO report on our SPOT program. GAO’s recommendations are helpful as we continue to refine our procedures as the science and the program matures."

Bob,

I'm aware of the GAO report because I have read it. Have you?

Here: I'll save you the "trouble": http://tiny.cc/w4dhv

Fellow citizens, read the TSA response very carefully and it is clear that the TSA intends to blow off the GAO. It's up to each one of us to stay in the faces of our Representatives and Senators, especially if you live in the district of one of the members of the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.

The members are: http://tiny.cc/3v5cw

And, I agree with Sandra. Your final paragraph was completely unprofessional. Enough said.

Submitted by Anonymous on

"most notably spotting an individual who was discovered to have explosive components at the Orlando airport in 2008."

Of course, those components were in a checked bag, and were not configured in a manner that could have exploded in flight. But you already know that, Bob, you're just incapable of honesty.

Submitted by RB on

What I don't understand is how BDO's can operate at all.

TSA is limited to administrative searches for WEI. Nothing more.

How does the BDO program comply with that requirement?

Submitted by Anonymous on
So if you’re stressing about missing a flight, that’s not a guaranteed visit from the BDOs.


Thanks; I feel much better now :-/
Submitted by Anonymous on
Can a passenger's slience or refusal to answer questions from BDOs be used as justification to refuse to allow them to exercise their liberty to fly without harassment or interference from the government?


No, there's no "liberty" to fly. Flying is a privilege.
Submitted by Anonymous on

How many of those 1800 arrests were terrorists?

How many known terrorists have slipped past TSA?

Submitted by RB on

This is how TSA protects people.

Harassment and the threat of bodily harm to a 93 year old lady.

Then TSA has the gall to issue a fine of $2500.

http://cbs2.com/video/?id=135273@kcbs.dayport.com

I thought TSA was on our side, not working for the terrorist!

Submitted by Anonymous on

So did the BDOs alert on the TSO guy who planted fake drugs in a girl's bag?

Submitted by Anonymous on

Bob said:

"Our BDOs have identified illegal activities ... most notably spotting an individual who was discovered to have explosive components at the Orlando airport in 2008. "

My interest piqued, I checked the story and found out there were no explosives and the suspicious items were in checked baggage.

Which confused me, because just a few days ago Bob said this in another post:


"...in checked baggage, our focus is on finding explosives. If you have a gun or knife in your checked bag, you’re not going to be able to go into the belly of the plane to get it..."


So why didn't the above apply to the incident in Orlando?

Submitted by Txrus on

Anonymous asked of Blogger Bob on May 21, 2010 4:34 PM:

My interest piqued, I checked the story and found out there were no explosives and the suspicious items were in checked baggage.

Which confused me, because just a few days ago Bob said this in another post:


"...in checked baggage, our focus is on finding explosives. If you have a gun or knife in your checked bag, you’re not going to be able to go into the belly of the plane to get it..."


So why didn't the above apply to the incident in Orlando?
*****************************
If memory serves, this is also the case where the pax in question was actually identified initially by OTHER pax' waiting in line as acting strangely-the Spotniks missed him completely until it was literally pointed out to them.

On a related subject Bob, how is it none of the Spotniks have ever managed to find any of the sticky-fingered screeners who have stolen from passengers nationwide? Or those screeners who, it turned out, were smuggling drugs & guns thru airports?

Finally, how is it the Times Square Bomber managed to waltz right thru the checkpoint @ JFK & get into his seat on the plane w/o being apprehended by the BDO's? Wouldn't someone who had actually tried to blow up Times Square a mere 52+ hours earlier, was trying to get out of the country before being caught, & knew he was being sought by law enforcement, have been a easy pick up for one of these 'highly trained' people?

Seriously, Bob-how did this one get by you guys??

Submitted by RB on

Anonymous said...
Can a passenger's slience or refusal to answer questions from BDOs be used as justification to refuse to allow them to exercise their liberty to fly without harassment or interference from the government?


No, there's no "liberty" to fly. Flying is a privilege.

May 21, 2010 3:33 PM
.................
Government has no right to restrict a persons travel without warrant or arrest.

There is liberty to fly or travel by any means a person wishes to use to move about the country.

I take it your a TSA employee spouting party line propaganda.

Submitted by GSOLTSO on

Anon sez - "Most of the BDO's that have crossed my path are arrogant and rude.

When I can be convinced that they do something more than drink coffee, glare at pax, and carry their oh so special clipboards around, then I'll think they are doing something worthwhile.

2 weeks classroom and 40 OJT does not make a profiler"

The BDOs that I have worked with have been professional, courteous, and in most cases downright nice. Glaring at passengers is not what we are doing, and we don't get to drink coffee at the checkpoint here, and I have never been on the checkpoint with a clipboard... Wait just a minute, which BDOs got clipboards? I didn't get a cool little clipboard... Man, I got ripped off.

Most of the time that I have seen a member of TSA with a clipboard, it usually involved schedules, or testing of the TSOs or some sort of information needing to be passed out to the workforce.

West
TSA Blog Team

Submitted by HappyToHelp on

Anonymous said...
"So why didn't the above apply to the incident in Orlando?"

Explosive components are prohibited in both carryon and checked baggage. According to the arrest affidavit, Kevin Brown planned to use a highly explosive liquid to build pipe bombs. However, he did not have a fully assembled bomb, and I have not read or seen anything that would lead me to believe he was targeting aviation. Despite him not targeting aviation, it is part of our mandate to stop him from bring bomb material in a checked bag.

You can check out our prohibited items list here.

Tim
TSA Blog Team

Submitted by Anonymous on

Bob,

When I compare your post to the GAO report, I can come to only one conclusion.

The TSA can't be trusted to be honest and forthright when it presents information. We must therefore critically analyze all statements for spin, exaggeration and outright misleading statements. We simply cannot take anything the TSA publishes at face value.

Submitted by Anonymous on
Anonymous wrote:
No, there's no "liberty" to fly. Flying is a privilege.


Flying is a privilege granted by a (common-carrier) airline in exchange for purchasing a ticket in accordance with the contract of carriage.

Flying (domestically) is not a privilege that should be able to be revoked by the government without due process. Any system that does revoke it that way (e.g., no-fly list) is so blatantly un-constitutional that I have a hard time understanding how anyone who passed a junior-high civics class could tolerate it.
Submitted by Donnie on

I'm really tired of the whole "well how many terrorists have you stopped!?" arguement. This is an impossible question to answer, because there's no way to measure it. How do you differentiate between an individual having a gun in their carry on bag by accident or because they planned to do harm to an aircraft?

How do you label a passenger trying to get through security with a peanut butter jar with home made electronic items wired inside but no explosive(and thus not illegal) and no explaination for why you did it?

How do you base BDO successes off of arrests when less than 14,000 of the 152,000 BDO referrals actually had any sort of background check run on them because only LEOs can run an NCIC (which isn't even a very good database when looking for TERRORISTS), and LEOs only get involved at very high behavioral thresholds (and even then, often are unwilling to get involved).

The MCO passenger was certainly one of the most notable SPOT referrals. Whether the pipe bombs were fully assembled or not doesn't change that. At the end of the day, he was a passenger who was trying to bring an explosive device on an aircraft. To debate this is just inane.

As far as the GAO report stating that 16 people "suspected" of terrorism who transversed multiple airport, this means very little. The BDO program is not designed to pinpoint an individual who has previously or will at some time in the future commit an act of terrorism.

The SPOT program pinpoints those WHO ARE IN THE ACT OF trying to commit an act of terrorism. These are the people who are going to display the types of behaviors the BDOs are looking for due to an intense fear of failing and/or being caught.

Joe Schmoe terrorist who is just traveling around the country for whatever reason has no reason to fear discovery because he is not in the act of committing terrorism.

Think about it. You're planning to rob a bank next year. You have to fly somewhere to visit some friends. Are you going to be a visible wreck when you go through the airport? No.

Now, change the scenario to a situation where you've just stolen a man's wallet up at the ticket counter and are proceeding through security. Are you going to be a visible wreck now? YES! Why? Because you're still in the act of a crime. Until you land on the other end and leave the airport, you're in danger. You have an intense fear of being discovered. This is how the SPOT program works.

There's been many references to El Al Airline security. This makes me laugh because Americans don't even want to take their shoes off. El Al security starts the minute you get to the curb. They assign an agent to "interview" you for 7 minutes before handing you off to another agent who continues the process and runs background checks on you. And if there is ANYTHING (including profiling) they don't like about you, YOU DON'T FLY! Effective security? YES. Would US travelers put up with it? NO.

It's insulting to be referred to as "morons" by the traveling public. The TSA workforce is just as diverse as any other. A significant portion is made up of previous law enforcement, current and previous members of all branches of the American military, business professionals, etc.

Many of us hold degrees as well as continue to develop our educations despite working for an agency that does not provide any tuition reimbursement whatsoever.

I gave up my previous career to serve my country after 9-11 as I felt it was my duty as an American, not because I was just "looking for an easy paycheck". I am extremely dedicated to protecting YOU, America, even if you don't appreciate it. Most of my co-workers that I work with every day are the same way.

It is a thankless job, but we will continue to do our best to prevent YOUR LIFE from being TAKEN as best we can, with what limited tools are provided to us.

Submitted by Anonymous on

I thought TSA mission is to protect the flying public, but wow it seems like the public hate them, so here's the big question "would you feel safe flying if airport screening were operated by private security firms"? that always seem to end in a horrific way. it's been 8+ years and TSA haven't lost a plane, I just think they need to professionalize their work force or merge it with CBP.

Submitted by Anonymous on

A TSO (probably TSORONNIE) spewed
No, there's no "liberty" to fly. Flying is a privilege.

Wrong. The Constitution does not enumerate the rights of the people. It, instead limits the authority of the government.

Submitted by Anonymous on

The BDO program has the potential to work wonders, BUT that is only if the BDO's are properly trained, and responsibly use those procedures. Should get people who were trained by the Israeli's to test BDO's. THOSE are real Behavior Detection officers.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Sandra said...
The program is a sham and nothing TSA says can change that.

Your last paragraph was totally inappropriate. This waste of our money by the TSA is nothing to joke about.
------------------------
So whats the point for you even reading this blog?

And you're right, that last paragraph was totally out of line. Doesnt Bob know he is to maintain a stern and serious tone at all times. This is the Gestapo, er I mean TSA Blog after all.
-------------------------
RB said....
http://cbs2.com/video/?id=135273@kcbs.dayport.com
-------------------------

Did you even watch that vid?
The elderly woman wasnt even involved in the altercation. The lady who did own the cooler was obviously out of control. Threat of bodily harm? get real, you can clearly see that the crazy lady throwing a temper tantrum hit the TSO who was maintaining control of the cooler full of prohibited items.

Then you see the lady throw a bunch of stuff in the trash... prohibs? Nope, she would not be allowed to have them to toss them out of they were. That stuff was fine, she was just tossing it out because she was too busy being a child instead of listening to the TSO who would most certainly have cleared what was medically necessary for the elderly woman, if this chick didnt go ballistic right away.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Anon said....
Can a passenger's silence or refusal to answer questions from BDOs be used as justification to send them to retaliatory, uh, I mean secondary, secreening?

Can a passenger's slience or refusal to answer questions from BDOs be used as justification to refuse to allow them to exercise their liberty to fly without harassment or interference from the government?
-------------------------

If a uniformed TSO comes up to you and asks you something (good morning, how are you today, where you flying to today, have a nice time out here?) and you ignore them, or look em in the eyes and don't respond at all... Yes that is going to seem out of place and you will probably be inviting extra scrutiny onto yourself by acting like that.

Also, flying is not a right or liberty.

Submitted by Anonymous on

TSA finishing the job terrorists started on 9/11, one outrage at a time.

Submitted by Anonymous on
So if you’re stressing about missing a flight, that’s not a guaranteed visit from the BDOs.

"not a guaranteed visit"??

Also, what if I'm stressing out about more than "missing my flight"? Like being seen naked? Or having my kids seen naked? Or the fact that some mouth-breather with a little training can declare that I am acting 'suspicious' and make my life hell?? What if I'm stressing about those things?
Submitted by Phil on

most BDO's sometimes do not respect the passenger. Improvement is needed.

Submitted by Anonymous on

How many BDOs were on duty when the Times Square bomber boarded a plane? Looks like he strolled right past them. As is usual for the TSA -- FAIL!

Submitted by Gunner on

Again:

Can a passenger's silence or refusal to answer questions from BDOs be used as justification to send them to retaliatory, uh, I mean secondary, screening?

Can a passenger's silence or refusal to answer questions from BDOs be used as justification to refuse to allow them to fly without harassment or interference from the government?

Submitted by Gunner on

A TSA employee, posting as Anonymous said....

No, there's no "liberty" to fly. Flying is a privilege.

If you really believe that, then go back a re-read the Constitution that you are supposed to protect -- and the notes from the Founding Fathers.

It is crystal clear that their intention was that government could no restrict the travel of its citizens. And the use of retaliatory screenings designed to make people miss their flights is government interference -- nothing more, nothing less -- and the primary reason that TSA needs to be disbanded.

Submitted by Anonymous on

TSA SPOT Program: Still Going Wrong

Psychiatrists linked to the National Academy of Sciences say there is no scientific basis behind the program. Why should we believe the TSA knows better?

Submitted by Anonymous on

Gunner said...

A TSA employee, posting as Anonymous said....

No, there's no "liberty" to fly. Flying is a privilege.

If you really believe that, then go back a re-read the Constitution that you are supposed to protect -- and the notes from the Founding Fathers.

It is crystal clear that their intention was that government could no restrict the travel of its citizens. And the use of retaliatory screenings designed to make people miss their flights is government interference -- nothing more, nothing less -- and the primary reason that TSA needs to be disbanded.
----------------------

Just like driving right? I mean anyone is allowed to drive a car or a truck without restrictions. Well, if you don't count all the restrictions on driving, driving is a totally unrestricted way for people to travel.

You folks seem to forget that it is also the governments job to protect its citizens. Don't like that with the attacks of 9/11 the gov't has decided that in order to protect the nation from attacks like that again we now have the TSA? Great, write you congress person to have the TSA disbanded.

Submitted by Anonymous on

GSOLTSO/West....

I guess you've never been to LAX then. Clipboards are standard issue. Saw them up close and personal at T1 not long ago. And these BDO's were at the gate not at the checkpoint.

Once I clear the checkpoint there should be no reason for any TSO at the gates doing anything... if there is then your organization has admitted it didn't do it's job in the first place.

Submitted by LTSO With Answers on
Are passengers required to answer inquiries from BDOs (or TSOs for that matter)?

Can a passenger's silence or refusal to answer questions from BDOs be used as justification to send them to retaliatory, uh, I mean secondary, secreening?

Can a passenger's slience or refusal to answer questions from BDOs be used as justification to refuse to allow them to exercise their liberty to fly without harassment or interference from the government?

It is a good rule of thumb to always try and cooperate with the screening process. Cooperating can help us discover answers to our suspicions.

Of the 1800 arrests resulting from BDO referral, how many involved passengers who intended to do harm to aviation? How many involved passengers who were carrying WEI (obviously at least one, the MCO case mentioned)?

The program can not tell if you are hiding intent to harm the aviation environment or if you are just hiding because you are a drug smuggler. The program just picks out those that are hiding. The additional screening you will go through will help differentiate between the two.
Submitted by K A Siley on
Did you even watch that vid?
The elderly woman wasnt even involved in the altercation. The lady who did own the cooler was obviously out of control. Threat of bodily harm? get real, you can clearly see that the crazy lady throwing a temper tantrum hit the TSO who was maintaining control of the cooler full of prohibited items.

Then you see the lady throw a bunch of stuff in the trash... prohibs? Nope, she would not be allowed to have them to toss them out of they were. That stuff was fine, she was just tossing it out because she was too busy being a child instead of listening to the TSO who would most certainly have cleared what was medically necessary for the elderly woman, if this chick didnt go ballistic right away.

Dear Anonymous TSO,

I did watch it. And as a person who has medical needs and who has not flown in three years because of the TSA, my sympathies are all with a woman who had checked with the TSA in advance, was assured she could bring her mother's food, and then ran into TSAs who were practicing medicine without a license, and determining whether or not her mother "needed" the food.

I've also seen videos of TSOs who told two doctors that their child did not need as much food as they had.

I know people who follow my life style who have been forced to throw out their travel food.

TSA has no policy regarding food. TSA says that passengers may bring food -- and then makes them throw it out.

I've had my hands slapped for reaching to keep a TSO from handling my food with dirty gloves -- after the TSO was asked to put on clean ones.

I haven't flown in three years because the stress of getting through a TSA check point is so great that I don't want to travel.

My mother didn't fly for the last five years of her life because she was afraid of being treated the way these women were.

Be proud.
Submitted by Anonymous on

Your post did a poor job of explaining the basic conclusions of the GAO report in question. The GAO concluded that the TSA had implemented the SPOT program without properly considering the feasibility of applying such methods as "behavior detection" (a pseudoscience that the TSA tries to pass off as legitimate by citing the names of the snake oil salesmen who sold them the program in the first place) in an aiport environment.

I just thought I should make that clear, because Bob's post certainly didn't.

Submitted by TSOWilliamReed on

Gunner said...
A TSA employee, posting as Anonymous said....

No, there's no "liberty" to fly. Flying is a privilege.

If you really believe that, then go back a re-read the Constitution that you are supposed to protect -- and the notes from the Founding Fathers.

It is crystal clear that their intention was that government could no restrict the travel of its citizens. And the use of retaliatory screenings designed to make people miss their flights is government interference -- nothing more, nothing less -- and the primary reason that TSA needs to be disbanded.

May 23, 2010 5:18 PM
---------------

Your argument would be valid if you were flying your own private plane. Anon should have said that you have the liberty to fly on your own, however using an airline jet is a privelage that can be taken away if you don't meet the standards set by the airline/faa. One of those standards is passing security. Your in a contract agreement with the airline that they can back out on at any time, of course they would have to give you a refund but the fact is they can still do it. That isn't a right, its a privelage. This is also why TSA doesn't screen private jets....

Submitted by TSOWilliamReed on

Anonymous said...
How many BDOs were on duty when the Times Square bomber boarded a plane? Looks like he strolled right past them. As is usual for the TSA -- FAIL!

May 23, 2010 10:51 AM
-------------

Your argument is invalid, the bomber wouldn't have been showing the red flags normally associated with someone trying to sneak something onto a plane to hurt someone, because he wasn't trying to do so. This is why he wouldn't have alarmed BDO's, he was no threat to the plane.

Submitted by Ayn R Key on

Anonymous TSO (probably Ron, but Bob does post anonymously) wrote...
Also, flying is not a right or liberty.

You continue to assert that, but that doesn't make it true.

The powers of the government are very clearly listed, most of them in Article One Section Eight. Then there are the restrictions on the government, listed in the bill of rights. True, travel by airplane is not explicitly listed, but then neither is posting on an internet forum. Everyone except a TSO would agree that posting on an internet forum is first amendment protected free speech.

Under the Articles of Confederation AND British Common Law, travel is a protected right. It was considered so basic when the constitution was written they felt it unnecessary to include it - and they added free speech because they felt it much more likely the government would attempt to abridge that right.

Moreover, even though travel isn't specifically listed, and you'd probably deny that the 9th and 10th amendments actually mean anything, one of the most basic jobs of the government is to guarantee the sanctity of the contract. And that's what an airline ticket is. It's a private contract between myself and the airline. They offered terms I found acceptable, and I offered terms they found acceptable, and we said "let's make a deal." No third party has the right to interfere with a private contract.

Now the TSA has the power to interfere with a private contract, but that doesn't contradict what I wrote about how the TSA doesn't have the right to interfere with a private contract. The bolded words are different. The TSA has neither a constitutional nor a moral basis for the job it does.

While I do not have the right to force any particular airline to carry me, if we come to an agreement on them doing so the TSA has no right to say otherwise.

Submitted by Anonymous on

re: The old ladies with the applesauce.

"Did you even watch that vid?"

Yes.

I see TSA agents trying to take something from the old woman by force. Repeatedly.

Are TSA agents authorized to use force to take a citizens property away from them?

Submitted by Dunstan on

"Psychiatrists linked to the National Academy of Sciences say there is no scientific basis behind the program. Why should we believe the TSA knows better?"

Who needs the expert opinion of a bunch of people with many years of training and both medical and psychiatric degrees? TSA can obviously compress that experience into a few days of training. At least that is what TSA would have the traveling public believe.

Submitted by Anonymous on
If you really believe that, then go back a re-read the Constitution that you are supposed to protect -- and the notes from the Founding Fathers.


Then we all have the right to hop on the space shuttle too then.

The people who wrote the constitution didn't know anything about commercial aviation, nor international terrorism either. Therefore, it's up to the courts to decide how to apply the document and related laws. So far, the courts have upheld the constitutionality of everything TSA does. That'll never change unless and until somebody brings a case before them.
Submitted by Anonymous on

I've been going through this stupid automated system for a long time. PLEASE PLEASE have an operator option, I need to talk with a person!!!!!!!!!!!

Submitted by Anonymous on

I wonder why the SPOTters didn't spot the Thief who stole this lady's $24,000 watch. http://jacksonville.com/news/metro/2010-05-23/story/woman-sues-over-miss...

They forced her, against her objections, to put the watch into a bin and through the xray.

'Coincidentally', she was selected for an additional security check, and was refused her request to retrieve the watch first.

When she finally returned to the conveyor belt, the Rolex was gone.

She asked for police to be called, but security officers told her she was disrupting the area and had to leave.

Now the TSA is claiming she never had the watch, despite witnesses who confirm she did. Oh, and somehow, the Security cameras apparently weren’t working.

SO, what good is SPOT if it can't even detect thieves among your own?

Submitted by Anonymous on

i would like to re-post this question since it was not answered:

Psychiatrists linked to the National Academy of Sciences say there is no scientific basis behind the program. Why should we believe the TSA knows better?

May 23, 2010 6:24 PM

Pages