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Tuesday, June 01, 2010
Traveling With Kids Banner

With the kickoff of the summer travel season, I thought I’d talk a little about traveling with the little crumb-snatchers.

Reduce the Stress for Kids: Let’s face it, checkpoints seem like busy and noisy places to children (and some adults too) and the prime place for a potential meltdown. By knowing the procedures and taking a few tips, we can’t guarantee you’ll prevent a meltdown, but you’ll have a better shot at gliding through the hoop with only net. If your child is old enough to understand, talk to them and let them know what to expect. Explain what the checkpoint is for and what they’re going to have to do. For some children, getting an idea of what the security checkpoint is helps to reduce stress and apprehension.

We Can’t Hold Your Child: Our officers would love to help you out and hold your child, but for liability reasons, they’re not allowed. If your hands are full and an officer doesn’t offer to help (most do), let them know that you need some help and they’ll help you through the checkpoint.

Children 12 and Under: Children 12 and under can leave their shoes, light jackets and headwear on during screening.

We Have To Screen Blankies, Etc.: If your child has a favorite toy or blanket that they never let go of, explain to them in advance that it’s going to have to take a trip through the X-ray tunnel and they’ll get it right back. (You may wonder why we have to screen such innocent items? Because people will try to hide prohibited items or weapons in them - we once found a gun hidden inside of a teddy bear.)

Don’t Send Your Kids Through the X-ray: I know the unwritten parenting rule of never waking a sleeping baby, but our officers can’t allow you to put your infant in their infant carrier through the X-ray to let them continue their nap. Yes, we’ve been asked many times, and no, you can’t.

We Will Not Separate You From Your Children (even if you want us to): If your child has to undergo secondary screening, you will go with your child. This may require you to be screened as well, but this works out, because the child gets to see it happen to you and that it’s no big deal. You can also request a private screening if you don’t want your child to be screened in public. We will not ask you to do anything that will separate you from your child or children.

Baby Formula, Breast Milk, Medicines & Juice: Medications, baby formula and food, breast milk, and juice are allowed in reasonable quantities exceeding 3.4 ounces (100ml) and are not required to be in the zip-top bag. Declare these items for inspection at the checkpoint. Click here to learn more about 3-1-1.

Snack Time!: Kids love their snacks. Food items that are in the form of a liquid or gel are generally not permitted however, items such as cakes, bread, donuts, ham sandwiches, etc. are all permitted. Here is a list of items that are prohibited at the checkpoint ... Creamy dips and spreads (cheeses, peanut butter, jams and salad dressings, jams, jellies, maple syrup, and soups).

Double Check Your Child’s Bag: Your child might want to take their toy gun or sword in their carry-on bag and think nothing of it. In the X-ray, toy hand grenades, guns and knives can look just like the real thing, and will hold you up at the checkpoint. To be safe, you might double check your child’s carry-on to make sure none of these items are in there.

Children with Disabilities: If your child has a disability or medical condition, please read our separate section on traveling with Children with Disabilities.

ID Questions: If your child is younger than 18, they are not required to have ID to travel. They’ll just need their boarding pass.

Advanced Imaging Technology: Just as with adults, Advanced Imaging Technology (AIT) screening is optional for all passengers, including children. If you would prefer, you may request alternate screening for your children, which could include a pat-down.

There are many expert travelers out there in the blogosphere that have some great advice. Seek it out for many more great tips from some travel hardened road warriors. For example, check out Jet with Kids.

Bob Burns
TSA Blog Team

Comments

Submitted by RB on

"Advanced Imaging Technology: Just as with adults, Advanced Imaging Technology (AIT) screening is optional for all passengers, including children. If you would prefer, you may request alternate screening for your children, which could include a pat-down."
................


Institutional Pedophilia brought to your by TSA!

Submitted by Renae on

Bob, thanks for the tips! I enjoy your blog very much! My husband and I are getting ready to take our three elementary-school-aged kids on an international journey that will require a stop at LAX. One of my kids has a metal appliance in his mouth--not braces, but something to make his bite wider. Will this cause a problem at security? The orthodontist's office doesn't seem to think we'll need a letter, but I want to be sure. Thanks for your input!

Submitted by Anonymous on

It is interesting that in this verbal group the simple question:

"Are TSA agents authorized to use force to take a citizen's property away from them?"

...has gone unanswered except for one response that seemed to support TSA agents using force to take possessions from an elderly woman.

"It's probably better for the TSO to try to handle the situation before the LEO's take care of business their way."

(Side note: You have an issue with the ways LEOs conduct their business? lol)

I don't plan to make this a daily, or even every post question, but this simple inquiry remains unanswered:

"Are TSA agents authorized to use force to take a citizen's property away from them?"

Submitted by Anonymous on

What about yogurt? I've assumed no, but it would be nice to have that clarified on the "Traveling with Food or Gifts" page.

Submitted by Anonymous on

RB - next time you travel, take a look at your fellow passengers. Would you enjoy a close encounter of the uncomfortable kind with them? I doubt it. And PS - Pedophilia is legally defined as an action bringing about a sexual stimulation, arousal, or satisfaction. Your comment is uncalled for an very disrespectful of thousands of TSA's screening officers who are doing their best to make sure you get to your destination in one piece, and not sprayed in a pinkish vapor from 35,000 feet. PS, Bob - on the donuts, you may want to mention to avoid the jelly-filled variety - "Liguids, GELS, and aerosols". And finally - how about kicking the families with the strollers and 20 diapers sacks out of the Diamond Traveler lanes? It annoys me to NO end to have some family pushing the big baby buggy with big black rubber baby buggy bumpers into the Diamond traveler lane because its the shortest, leaving the line clogged for the next 20 minutes whilst they disassemble their traveling gear and sack up all of the sippy cups, diaper wipes, and juice bottles, and then another 20 minutes until the backup eases. Thank you.

Submitted by Bubba on

Come on Bob, stop with the puppy posts and address the elephant in the room you have already confessed to be "aware" of: The extensive and detailed article in Nature (the top scientific journal) saying that behavior detection techniques adopted at considerable cost by the TSA have no scientific basis.

Submitted by Sandra on

Regarding WBI, Bob wrote (or copied from the TSA website):

"Just as with adults, Advanced Imaging Technology (AIT) screening is optional for all passengers, including children. If you would prefer, you may request alternate screening for your children, which could include a pat-down."

"Could", Bob? Don't you mean "will"? Or is there some screening method, other than WBI, that is acceptable? If so, please let us know what it is.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Care to address this statement by
Krys Bart, the CEO and president of the Reno-Tahoe Airport Authority:

"If the TSA says that you have to have an option, and they don't staff for that option, it means that they will not have enough people to do the pat-downs," Bart said. "So, either you stay there and wait a long time or you don't have an option. There needs to be some real clarification on those issues," Bart said. "Do you or do you not have an option? The TSA tells me that this is optional. My colleagues tell me their experiences in some airports prove that this is not optional."

Submitted by Anonymous on

"Advanced Imaging Technology: Just as with adults, Advanced Imaging Technology (AIT) screening is optional for all passengers, including children. If you would prefer, you may request alternate screening for your children, which could include a pat-down."

And what about those of us traveling alone with infants? With WTMD, it was a simple matter to walk through with the child. Now that you want to take naked pictures of people, what exactly will the procedure be? I can't hand you my child (and never would in the first place) so I can't stand with my arms elevated like a criminal being patted down, nor can my child support herself on her own in your nude-o-scope. How is this in any way an improvement, Bob?

Submitted by Anonymous on

Bob wrote,
"Baby Formula, Breast Milk, Medicines & Juice: Medications, baby formula and food, breast milk, and juice are allowed in reasonable quantities exceeding 3.4 ounces (100ml) and are not required to be in the zip-top bag. Declare these items for inspection at the checkpoint. Click here to learn more about 3-1-1.


Snack Time!: Kids love their snacks. Food items that are in the form of a liquid or gel are generally not permitted however, items such as cakes, bread, donuts, ham sandwiches, etc. are all permitted. Here is a list of items that are prohibited at the checkpoint… Creamy dips and spreads (cheeses, peanut butter, jams and salad dressings, jams, jellies, maple syrup, and soups).[sic]"

So children can have juices in excess of 3.4 oz to wash down their snacks, but grown-ups can't? That doesn't seem fair.

What about a creamy dip or spread applied to a ham sandwich?

Submitted by Anonymous on

RB your cynicism is noted, but must you be so negative all the time? I support your first amendment rights, just as I support any other rights, but it gets really boring seein you whine and cry about pedophiles, and virtual strip searches, have you nothing better to do with your time, perhaps you should find a hobby, or a job? What more can you say about TSA that you have not already said? Have you anyting original?

Submitted by Trollkiller on

So your "officers" can't hold a child because of liability fears but can grope a child as part of their duties?

Are y'all high or what?

If a parent hands you a child to hold while they break down the stroller or what not, your "officers" are under no more liability strain than normal. It sounds to me like you don't trust your "officers" to behave properly.

Submitted by Anonymous on

How many kids can we put through the xray scanner at one time?

Should they go through in a bin, or without?

/joke

Submitted by Bubba on

Bob,

It has now been a full week since Nature, the leading scientific journal, published an extensive article criticizing the lack of Science behind the SPOT program. You have stated you are aware of the article, but have not responded to it. Instead, we get posts on completely unrelated subjects.

It the TSA going to continue to rampantly ignore all scientific research? Don´t you think ignoring this particular article, in a venue that all top scientists in the World will read, is way beyond acceptable? Until when do you think you can keep this up?

Submitted by Anonymous on

Blog posts: ID Questions: If your child is younger than 18, they are not required to have ID to travel. They’ll just need their boarding pass. is this accurate? I've had discussions with folks that said they had to get some form of ID (Passport) for kids traveling domestically.

Submitted by Liz on

Thanks for this blog post. My family is traveling in about a week and I have been jumping from link to link through the website trying to figure out everything I need to know not only for my husband and I, but our toddler as well. Thanks!

Submitted by Anonymous on

Don't like it RB? Then don't fly.

Submitted by RB on

Anonymous said...
Don't like it RB? Then don't fly.
.......................
That's your answer to a government agency gone wild?

I think I will continue protesting for awhile yet.

http://www.rupture.co.uk/Self_portrait.html

Submitted by JamoramaGuitar on

My son and I traveled down to Florida last year for fun in the sun and I tried to convince him to leave the studded belts and bracelets at home, but he wouldn't listen and assured me not to "be anal" as he so delicately put it.

Sure enough, on the way down, we had to transfer on the ground once and he was asked to do a random search in both instances of boarding the plane.

On the way back up, his mail bag was searched once. I think after the trip, he appreciates my advice that I gave. haha

Nice post!

Submitted by Robert Johnson on

Quote from Anonymous: "Don't like it RB? Then don't fly."

Hey Anon! This isn't China, North Korea, or any other communist place. We don't have to like it and we can work to change it. And this blog is theoretically for designed for that.

That's like me saying "Don't like what RB says? Don't come to the blog." And you'd rightly tell me to go fly a kite.

This is still America, you know, and we still have rights. Just because you're willing to give up yours doesn't mean that everyone else should, or at least be quiet about it.

Robert

Submitted by Dan on

Anonymous said...

Don't like it RB? Then don't fly.

June 3, 2010 1:28 PM


Is this the official TSA position? If so, then state that in writing. If not, please provide your full name and employee number so a proper complaint can be filed.

Submitted by TSO Tom on

"Are TSA agents authorized to use force to take a citizen's property away from them?"
***********************************
NO we are NOT authorized to use for anything concerning screening of property or persons.

Submitted by Scott Lewis on

Pssst: it's not a puppy post every time it doesn't address the very vocal minorities constant rants. This blog seems to serve many purposes, including travel tips. Some of you think it's something that it's not, like a soap box for you to talk directly to tsp brass and have every issue on your mind addressed and change lots of things specifically important to you.

Submitted by Patrick (BOS TSO) on
Anon said...
Are TSA agents authorized to use force to take a citizen's property away from them?

No. No. No. And again, no.
And we wouldn't have to anyways, because when searching the bag, the bag and any items are under our control and the passenger is not allowed to handle items under the TSO's control.

However, it's highly, highly unrecommended at the same time that you not try to grab an item out of the TSO's hand.
Submitted by Anonymous on

Off topic, but I was traveling a lot this month and everywhere I went the TSA agents were really cool!!!! Especially when my husband misplaced his boarding pass right before final screening to Israel ... the most amazing TSA agent grabbed his passport and got him taken care checked in (I didn't get the agents name, but she was a middle aged black woman with extremely short hair in Newark working the Continental flight to Tel Aviv on the afternoon of May 14th, I would like to see her rewarded for her greatness).

Submitted by GSOLTSO on

Renae sez - "Bob, thanks for the tips! I enjoy your blog very much! My husband and I are getting ready to take our three elementary-school-aged kids on an international journey that will require a stop at LAX. One of my kids has a metal appliance in his mouth--not braces, but something to make his bite wider. Will this cause a problem at security? The orthodontist's office doesn't seem to think we'll need a letter, but I want to be sure. Thanks for your input!"

The netal device should cause no problems at all. If the item alarms, the TSO will have to clear it, but this can be done by visual inspection. I hope you and your family have a great trip and I hope that you can find your way through LAX fairly easily! Take lots of pictures whiloe you are there and have FUN!

West
TSA Blog Team

Submitted by GSOLTSO on

Anon sez - "Are TSA agents authorized to use force to take a citizen's property away from them?"

TSOs are not allowed to use force to remove an item from a passenger. However, if the passenger takes something that has not been cleared for travel into the sterile area (whether forcibly removing it from a TSOs grasp, or simply picking it up from the table and walking away), it is a LEO referral - minimum. TSOs are to maintain control of an item until it is cleared for entry, it is given back to the passenger outside the sterile area, it is given to a family member or friend outside the sterile area, or it is surrendered to the TSO. If the passenger forcibly removes the item from a TSO, it can be considered interfering with the screening process (hence the reason for calling the LEO). I hope this answers your question Anon!

West
TSA Blog Team

Submitted by GSOLTSO on

Anon sez - "What about yogurt? I've assumed no, but it would be nice to have that clarified on the "Traveling with Food or Gifts" page."

Yogurt is not allowed unless it is in a 3.4 oz container, or unless it is medically necessary.

West
TSA Blog Team

Submitted by GSOLTSO on

TrollKiller sez - "So your "officers" can't hold a child because of liability fears but can grope a child as part of their duties?

Are y'all high or what?

If a parent hands you a child to hold while they break down the stroller or what not, your "officers" are under no more liability strain than normal. It sounds to me like you don't trust your "officers" to behave properly."

Welcome back TK!

There is no groping involved, it is simply clearing the passenger (child or adult)to make certain that they have no dangerous items on them (we can save the argument until later on whether a dirty diaper is considered a dangerous item!!!).

The liability is much higher than you think. If I take a child from one of the parents, and something happens (the child squirms and I lose grip and whoops baby falls and is injured - liable, if the baby begins to squall and bites me - now the parent is liable, baby has a seizure or other medical condition and something happens and I do not know what to do - I am liable.... this list could go on for hours) I can be held liable and TSA can be held liable as well. Some of our employees have been around children their whole lives and know exactly what to do with them, some of our workers - not so much. It is just not something that TSA should sanction on a national level - it opens the agency up to lawsuits, and it places some of the employees in a position to be sued as well.

West
TSA Blog Team

Submitted by GSOLTSO on

Anon sez - "Blog posts: ID Questions: If your child is younger than 18, they are not required to have ID to travel. They’ll just need their boarding pass. is this accurate? I've had discussions with folks that said they had to get some form of ID (Passport) for kids traveling domestically."

Children under 18 do not need an ID to enter the checkpoint area or fly domestically. Internationally is a different story, they have to have a passport to travel outside the US. Internal travel does not require a passport for passengers under the age of 18.

West
TSA Blog Team

Submitted by GSOLTSO on

Liz - sez "Thanks for this blog post. My family is traveling in about a week and I have been jumping from link to link through the website trying to figure out everything I need to know not only for my husband and I, but our toddler as well. Thanks!"

You are quite welcome Liz, I hope you and your family have a great trip and have some fun!

West
TSA Blog Team

Submitted by Anonymous on

Renae and Liz, what is your relationship to TSA?

Submitted by Phil on

Bob, isn't it true that neither people under 18 years of age nor those who are at least 18 years of age are required to show ID to TSA in order to fly? Doesn't showing ID simply earn people a less-thorough search of their belongings and avoidance of questioning?

--
Phil
Showing ID only affects honest people.
What if the people with the power to secretly put your name on a "no-fly" list didn't like the reason for which you want to fly?

Submitted by Raju on

This is nice information for me .I have some doubts,can you clarify me ?what about those of us traveling along with infants?

Submitted by Anonymous on

Blog posts: ID Questions: If your child is younger than 18, they are not required to have ID to travel. They’ll just need their boarding pass. is this accurate? I've had discussions with folks that said they had to get some form of ID (Passport) for kids traveling domestically.

** no, children under the age of 18 DO NOT need ID, just their boarding passes, if they are old enough they will more than likely be asked their name and age.

"Just as with adults, Advanced Imaging Technology (AIT) screening is optional for all passengers, including children. If you would prefer, you may request alternate screening for your children, which could include a pat-down."

"Could", Bob? Don't you mean "will"? Or is there some screening method, other than WBI, that is acceptable? If so, please let us know what it is.

** there will never be just the WBI lane open, there will ALWAYS be an additional lane available. If you don't want to be screened with the WBI then open your eyes and look at the checkpoint. The metal detectors don't look anything like the WBI. Choose a different line.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Anonymous said...
"Advanced Imaging Technology: Just as with adults, Advanced Imaging Technology (AIT) screening is optional for all passengers, including children. If you would prefer, you may request alternate screening for your children, which could include a pat-down."

And what about those of us traveling alone with infants? With WTMD, it was a simple matter to walk through with the child. Now that you want to take naked pictures of people, what exactly will the procedure be? I can't hand you my child (and never would in the first place) so I can't stand with my arms elevated like a criminal being patted down, nor can my child support herself on her own in your nude-o-scope. How is this in any way an improvement, Bob?

June 1, 2010 8:10 PM

Geez
A week has gone by and no TSAer/blogger has responded to this quite reasonable question.
What is a parent traveling solo to do?

Submitted by Anonymous on


I've had discussions with folks that said they had to get some form of ID (Passport) for kids traveling domestically.



There's no requirement for anyone to possess a passport to travel domesticaly.
Submitted by Anonymous on

Renae said...
Bob, thanks for the tips! I enjoy your blog very much! My husband and I are getting ready to take our three elementary-school-aged kids on an international journey that will require a stop at LAX. One of my kids has a metal appliance in his mouth--not braces, but something to make his bite wider. Will this cause a problem at security? The orthodontist's office doesn't seem to think we'll need a letter, but I want to be sure. Thanks for your input!
___________________________________
No the piece of metal in your kids mouth will not set off any alarms.

Submitted by Dunstan on

Anonymous said...

Don't like it RB? Then don't fly.

June 3, 2010 1:28 PM

Hardly helpful. Don't shoot the messengers- even though they are telling you a point of view that you would rather not hear. Sooner or later the truth about the effectiveness and safety all of TSAs equipment, attitudes and procedures will be revealed. Right or wrong, RB at least has the courage to speak up.

Submitted by Anonymous on

"There is no groping involved, it is simply clearing the passenger (child or adult)to make certain that they have no dangerous items on them"

And you do this by groping the child. Please tell the truth in the future.

Submitted by AngelMt on

"Geez
A week has gone by and no TSAer/blogger has responded to this quite reasonable question.
What is a parent traveling solo to do?"

REALLY????
Read the other comments!
I posted the following:

"** there will never be just the WBI lane open, there will ALWAYS be an additional lane available. If you don't want to be screened with the WBI then open your eyes and look at the checkpoint. The metal detectors don't look anything like the WBI. Choose a different line."

Submitted by RB on

GSOLTSO said...
Anon sez - "What about yogurt? I've assumed no, but it would be nice to have that clarified on the "Traveling with Food or Gifts" page."

Yogurt is not allowed unless it is in a 3.4 oz container, or unless it is medically necessary.

West
TSA Blog Team

June 4, 2010 9:24 AM
................
So why is 4 ounces of yogurt safe if it's medically required but not safe if a person is just planning on eating something on the airplane?

Everyone needs to eat and that could be construed to be medically necessary.

Submitted by RB on

Patrick (BOS TSO) said...
Anon said...
Are TSA agents authorized to use force to take a citizen's property away from them?

No. No. No. And again, no.
And we wouldn't have to anyways, because when searching the bag, the bag and any items are under our control and the passenger is not allowed to handle items under the TSO's control.

However, it's highly, highly unrecommended at the same time that you not try to grab an item out of the TSO's hand.

June 4, 2010 2:44 AM
............
So you agree that once a traveler submits property for screening that TSA has full custody of those items until screening is completed and TSA has returned the items to the owner.

I agree with you!

Submitted by TSO Tom on

An anonymous poster talked about how a TSO from Newark helped her husband get checked in quickly, and how nice the officer was. The poster said she'd like to see the officer rewarded for her kindness. With that said, a word of advice to all who travel through our airports:
when you have an experience with a TSO that is considered in your opinion to be outstanding service, please call it to the attention of a supervisor so that a compliment card can be completed and that officer can be recognized. Likewise, if you have a not so pleasant experience, I urge you to do the same so the officer may be corrected. And to those who do not believe that complaining to a supervisor is productive, just go n your merry way. Anon, thank you for recognizing this unknown officer in this forum, it means much to us who take pride in our jobs.

Submitted by GSOLTSO on

RB sez - "So why is 4 ounces of yogurt safe if it's medically required but not safe if a person is just planning on eating something on the airplane?

Everyone needs to eat and that could be construed to be medically necessary."

I can give no answer other than that is what TSA has designated on their page and what is in the SOP. All medically exempted LAG items undergo additional testing for explosive elements.

I can find no further info on it RB.

West
TSA Blog Team

Submitted by GSOLTSO on

Anon sez "And what about those of us traveling alone with infants? With WTMD, it was a simple matter to walk through with the child. Now that you want to take naked pictures of people, what exactly will the procedure be? I can't hand you my child (and never would in the first place) so I can't stand with my arms elevated like a criminal being patted down, nor can my child support herself on her own in your nude-o-scope. How is this in any way an improvement, Bob?"

Anytime you are travelling with an infant, you are always going to have a bit harder time than the average traveller with a backpack and sandals. I have screened adults with their infants many times, it is a fairly simple process, and all you have to do is let them know when you begin processing your items through the xray. You have the option of not going to the AIT (whether you have an infant with you or not), there is a patdown involved for both you and the infant, but it usually doesn't take but an extra couple of minutes to do this with the infant (as opposed to just doing the pat down on the adult). The reason all passengers are screened is to make certain that no dangerous/illegal items are on the passengers coming through. It is a sad fact that infants have to be screened as well as adults. If we stop screening a certain group of people, a couple of things will happen:

1. Members of every other group of person NOT included in the exclusion group will raise Cain because they are not getting the same treatment (which will result in roughly 1.8 billion lawsuits overnight - jk!).

2. People with nefarious intent will have an easy access way to deliver dangerous/illegal items into the flights.

I hope this response helped you some and I hope you have a nice trip the next time out!

West
TSA Blog Team

Submitted by Anonymous on

For me, it was all about timing. Luckily I had a really good agent named Lamont that new how to deal with children. My son, Dennis began throwing a tantrum just as we approached. He had just seen something on TV about planet9productions and wanted to continue watching but we had to go as our flight time was drawing near. Lamont simply approached and asked everyone to step back so he could talk to Dennis. He very gently explained why it was important for Dennis to cooperate and give up his toy for screening. He then gave him a piece of paper that he drew a Smiley Face on. Funny how something so simple did the trick. The other agents said Lamont just had 'the gift' for that sort of thing. Now when Dennis and I travel he always asks the TSA agent if he can have a Smiley Face. (I carry pen and paper and am very great full when they oblige) I used to think we needed a lot to occupy his time when we travel. Thanks to Lamont, now I know all I need is my pen and pad... and an understanding TSA agent. I truly appreciate them. Not only do they have to keep aware and keep us safe but they also have to deal with soooo many different walks of life. I'm sure this is very hard to balance. Dennis and I Thank You.

Submitted by RB on

Anonymous said...
RB - next time you travel, take a look at your fellow passengers. Would you enjoy a close encounter of the uncomfortable kind with them? I doubt it. And PS - Pedophilia is legally defined as an action bringing about a sexual stimulation, arousal, or satisfaction. Your comment is uncalled for an very disrespectful of thousands of TSA's screening officers who are doing their best to make sure you get to your destination in one piece, and not sprayed in a pinkish vapor from 35,000 feet. PS, Bob - on the donuts, you may want to mention to avoid the jelly-filled variety - "Liguids, GELS, and aerosols". And finally - how about kicking the families with the strollers and 20 diapers sacks out of the Diamond Traveler lanes? It annoys me to NO end to have some family pushing the big baby buggy with big black rubber baby buggy bumpers into the Diamond traveler lane because its the shortest, leaving the line clogged for the next 20 minutes whilst they disassemble their traveling gear and sack up all of the sippy cups, diaper wipes, and juice bottles, and then another 20 minutes until the backup eases. Thank you.

June 1, 2010 5:32 PM

......................
If you and the rest of the tsa screeners don't want to be classified with a bunch of perverts then I suggest not looking at naked images of little kids.

You know it's wrong!

For the rest of you whiners I don't plan on leaving anytime soon.

TSA needs my input!

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