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Friday, July 02, 2010
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I have long allowed off topic comments. However, after many complaints from folks who would understandably like to stay on the subject, I am providing this post as a place to comment things that are way off topic with the current post.

I’ve added a link to this post on our sidebar so people will know to post off topic comments here.

You now have the option of subscribing to posts, so you’ll be able to keep up with the comments here if you so choose. So it’s not as if your comment is being exiled to the land of forgotten comments. We’ll be paying attention, and you can stay up to date with an RSS feed.

As much as we’d like to hear about your synchronized swimming club, I ask that all comments posted here remain TSA focused and adhere to TSA’s comment policy.

Bob Burns
TSA Blog Team

Comments

Submitted by Anonymous on

Ponter said...
'The TSA is strongly committed protecting the privacy and civil liberties of all passengers'.
No they are not.
You have a 'choice' - either be stripped naked in a scanner or be sexually assaulted by a grope-down.
If privacy REALLY mattered to the TSA you would be using Advanced Target Recognition(ATR)NOW. You may say it has not been fully evaluated yet - no because the TSA is spending all its time and money rushing in hundreds of naked body scanners at a cost of tens of millions of dollars.
You could ensure security AND protect privacy, but the TSA has clearly shown it does not want to protect privacy.

Submitted by Ponter on

Anonymous on August 26, 2010 4:18 PM wrote: "You have a 'choice' - either be stripped naked in a scanner or be sexually assaulted by a grope-down.... You could ensure security AND protect privacy, but the TSA has clearly shown it does not want to protect privacy."

I'm very sorry you feel that way. That's what happens when you have biased media that believe it's in their best interest to slander the TSA.

The FACT is that the new Enhanced Pat Down is not a "sexual assault" or a "grope-down." The FACT is that enemies who are determined to kill Americans have become much more devious about hiding weapons. The FACT is that in this threat environment, the TSA needs enhanced methods of inspection that can detect dangerous items artfully concealed under clothing to protect the aviation system from people who seek to kill Americans. The FACT is that AIT indisputably provides this capability. The FACT is that the TSA's operating procedures ensure that our privacy is protected. And if you are uncomfortable with the Enhanced Pat Down you have the choice of AIT, which is not only much more comfortable, but GUARANTEES your privacy.

We can have complete confidence that AIT is a highly effective technology that protects both aviation AND privacy! You can believe the lies and distortions in the biased media, or you can believe the TSA. I believe the TSA, because unlike the media and ignorant bloggers, they have no reason to lie to anyone.

As September 11 approaches, it's time to remember and reflect on the consequences of inadequate security. In this time of War, we cannot afford skepticism and doubt about our government's efforts to prevent the tragedy of that awful day that forever changed America. Instead of spreading the slander perpetrated against the heroic officials and officers who daily do battle at the front lines of the Global War on Terror, how about putting aside our selfish mistrust and UNITING behind the TSA instead of impeding them!

Submitted by RB on

Ponter said...
Anonymous on August 26, 2010 4:18 PM wrote: "You have a 'choice' - either be stripped naked in a scanner or be sexually assaulted by a grope-down.... You could ensure security AND protect privacy, but the TSA has clearly shown it does not want to protect privacy."

I'm very sorry you feel that way. That's what happens when you have biased media that believe it's in their best interest to slander the TSA.

The FACT is that the new Enhanced Pat Down is not a "sexual assault" or a "grope-down." The FACT is that enemies who are determined to kill Americans have become much more devious about hiding weapons. The FACT is that in this threat environment, the TSA needs enhanced methods of inspection that can detect dangerous items artfully concealed under clothing to protect the aviation system from people who seek to kill Americans. The FACT is that AIT indisputably provides this capability. The FACT is that the TSA's operating procedures ensure that our privacy is protected. And if you are uncomfortable with the Enhanced Pat Down you have the choice of AIT, which is not only much more comfortable, but GUARANTEES your privacy.

..............
Well that was all of that stuff (BB won't let me use the appropriate words) I could stand.

The FACT is TSA has done more to damage American freedoms than all terrorist attacks against this country that have ever occurred.

Open handedly feeling up a person is a sexual assualt. If you don't believe so then go out on the street and do one of these "Enhanced TSA Grope Downs" and see what happens, mate.

Submitted by Earl Pitts on

@George: "I'd bet on a post about how the secret SOP explicitly prohibits both the touching of sensitive areas and retaliatory abuse. So the allegations of abusive or retaliatory pat-downs are merely the unfounded complaints overly-critical people who want to make the TSA look bad. And, of course, a reminder that the easiest way to avoid this kind of incident is simply to step into the safe, family-friendly Advanced Imaging Technology machine that protects privacy while it protects aviation."

Cavuto on Fox talked about this the other day on his show. He didn't buy that there wasn't an informal and unwritten policy that TSA was using enhanced patdowns to punish and retaliate against people that opted out of the screening.

Of course, the TSA apologist denied that, but he still wasn't buying it.

If you lose Fox, you lose Middle America.

Earl

Submitted by Troubled Flyer on

I see several messages here stating that the TSA doesn't believe an Enhanced Patdown constitutes sexual assault. I had a TSO place his hand on my genitals during a rubdown performed on me after an opt-out. He's not my medical practitioner and it was unwanted contact. TSA can try to claim it was legal because I "consented" somehow, but that simply doesn't hold water. Even if I was a willing participant (which I wasn't), it's no different than a back-alley massage parlor claiming they are engaged in consensual sexual contact with their customers. It's simply not legal. My previous encounters at airport checkpoints have always gone smoothly until AIT was implemented. Now I'm encountering delays everywhere AIT has appeared and I'm receiving unwanted and inappropriate physical contact. This has to stop.

Submitted by Kat on

Dear Pair-a-Docs,

Funny thing. I have done my research. I have contacted the TSA multiple times. Takes them (on average) three months to get back to me, and what they send me is boiler-plate which doesn't answer the question.

Also, didja know that you can't buy 100 milliliter containers in the US that are food-safe? I do. I've ordered a batch from Canada. Lock-n-lock brand. Cost me a pretty penny, too, with the shipping.

But see, Doc, the TSA has these signs. They don't say 3.4 ounces or 100 milliliters. They say 3.0 ounces. And I'm concerned that some ill-trained jerk is going to tell me to throw out my medically required food AND my expensive containers.

Moreover, given that Nadine Hayes was arrested when she tried to bring medically required food through for her mother AFTER she notified the TSA about the needs, I'm concerned, and justifiably so.

If I could leave it all at home, I would. But I can't. And I just happen to be tired of the hassle, so I'm trying to get something concrete settled before I fly so that maybe, just maybe, I can get on a plane and not feel like throwing up from the stress of getting medically required food and equipment through the check point.

Submitted by Anonymous on

"The FACT is that the new Enhanced Pat Down is not a "sexual assault" or a "grope-down."

It's just the TSA's way of saying, 'We love you.'

Submitted by Ponter on

@RB: The FACT is TSA has done more to damage American freedoms than all terrorist attacks against this country that have ever occurred.

It's good to talk about the various freedoms we have in the United States. But none of them mean anything when lax security lets terrorists turn an airplane into a weapon of mass destruction. The TSA has protected our most important freedom, the freedom from terrorism, by keeping people who seek to kill Americans off of airplanes. As you probably are aware, there hasn't been a repetition of 9/11 since the TSA began protecting the air transportation system. There is NO possible argument against that track record of proven success!

I'm willing to accept a little inconvenience to be protected from people who seek to kill Americans. I'm willing to let the security experts decide what I can and cannot carry on an airplane to be protected from people who seek to kill Americans. I'm willing to let the TSA use the most advanced technology to provide proven enhanced detection of weapons carried by people who seek to kill Americans. And I'm grateful that the TSA has thoughtfully provided an effective alternative in the form of an Enhanced Pat down for those who are are needlessly afraid of AIT.

The TSA is protecting our freedom, day in and day out! It's unfortunate that some people see the necessary responses to the current threat environment as "damaging" to freedom. It is perhaps causing a small amount of inconvenience and restriction, but that's a price we should be willing to pay for protecting our most important freedom, the freedom from terrorist attack! If it's causing you inconvenience, it's surely making things much more difficult for terrorists who seek to kill Americans!

Open handedly feeling up a person is a sexual assualt. If you don't believe so then go out on the street and do one of these "Enhanced TSA Grope Downs" and see what happens, mate.

Just because you and any number of biased media and ignorant bloggers consider the Enhanced Pat Down "sexual assault" doesn't make it so. The FACT is that the TSA has determined that this Enhanced Pat Down is a necessary response to the current threat environment. Remember that it is merely an alternative search, thoughtfully provided for people who have been spooked by all the lies about AIT. If you indeed consider this alternative a "sexual assault," you can simply choose AIT. It's more comfortable, and the TSA's operating procedures GUARANTEE your privacy!

Rather than aiding the enemy by continuing to repeat the lies and slander about AIT, why not help the TSA protect our freedom by spreading the truth: AIT is a new level of proven enhanced protection against terrorist threats, and the TSA's operating procedures ensure enhanced protection of our privacy!

Submitted by RB on

Ponter said...

August 27, 2010 11:37 AM

.................................
Ponter, TSA is turning this country into a police state.

That is damaging to our way of life.

That is Un-american!

Submitted by Al Ames on

TSA is protecting our freedom? We have to give up our freedom to protect it?

Reminds me of the old addage "We had to burn down the village to save it."

You can't give up something in order to protect it. Once you give up something, it's gone, and never gonna come back without a huge fight.

Please show me where freedom from terrorism is our most prized and protected freedom. Funny, the Founding Fathers didn't seem to think so and put the freedom of speech, religion and press as the number one recognized right. Terrorism existed then, yet they didn't think that protection from it was necessary to be enumerated.

No, Ponter, you can't preserve freedom by giving it up. That line has been tried in every repressive regime and look what it's gotten them. And you can't preserve freedom by willingly selling everyone else's for them. If you want to, that's your right. It's not your right to sell mine though just so you can be "safe."

If you want to live in a safe place, try moving to North Korea. They have very little terrorism there and the people are well "protected" by the government there. Is that how you really want to live?

Al

Submitted by Anonymous on

"The FACT is that the new Enhanced Pat Down is not a "sexual assault" or a "grope-down."

It's just the TSA's way of saying, 'We love you.'
-------------------------------------
Put a couple of pet toy squeakers in your shorts. You'll not only feel the love, but have sound effects as well.

Submitted by Anonymous on
As you probably are aware, there hasn't been a repetition of 9/11 since the TSA began protecting the air transportation system. There is NO possible argument against that track record of proven success!

Lisa: “By your logic, I could claim that this rock keeps tigers away.”
Homer “Hmm; how does it work?”
Lisa: “It doesn’t work; it’s just a stupid rock!”
Homer: “Uh-huh.”
Lisa: “… but I don’t see any tigers around, do you?”
Homer,: “Lisa, I want to buy your rock…”

There was no '9/11' in all the recorded years of flight BEFORE 9/11 either. So the fact that it hasn't happened in the last 9 years is... unimpressive.
Submitted by Bubba on

The off topic posts are almost disappearing from the screen!!

And we are still waiting for an answer to that Nature article criticizing the SPOT program. Remember Nature is the most respected scientific journal in the World.

Submitted by Omars on

Why have we heard nothing about the very major incident at PHL, as reported by the Inquirer?

As reported, TSA's behavior is beyond outrageous; it's also illegal. And your screeners seem to forget they're not law enforcement. If it doesn't threaten the aircraft and its passengers, it's none of their business, period.

Has every TSA person on duty at that checkpoint been summarily fired for cause for violations of law and policy? Or does ACLU as usual have to sue TSA to get you people to do the right thing?

This is a complete failure of public trust and a complete lack of understanding of the agency's mission. Increasingly it seems the only way to fix TSA is to get rid of it. The $7 baggage handlers pre 9/11/2001 did just as good a job and cost taxpayers a lot less, and all without the jackbooted-thugs mentality.

http://consumerist.com/2010/08/tsa-screeners-check-luggage-call-your-hus...
 

Submitted by Anonymous on

" The TSA has protected our most important freedom, the freedom from terrorism, by keeping people who seek to kill Americans off of airplanes. As you probably are aware, there hasn't been a repetition of 9/11 since the TSA began protecting the air transportation system. There is NO possible argument against that track record of proven success! "

Of course there is, starting with the fact that terrorism is an incredibly rare event regardless of what sorts of passenger screening occurs. TSA's campaign of sexual assault against Americans has little, if anything, to do with air travel's safety record.

Submitted by Anonymous on

"I'm willing to accept a little inconvenience to be protected from people who seek to kill Americans."


Sexual assault is not "a little inconvenience."

"I'm willing to let the security experts decide what I can and cannot carry on an airplane to be protected from people who seek to kill Americans."

TSA is not staffed by security experts.

"I'm willing to let the TSA use the most advanced technology to provide proven enhanced detection of weapons carried by people who seek to kill Americans."

What does that have to do with TSA's invasive and ineffective strip-search technology?

"And I'm grateful that the TSA has thoughtfully provided an effective alternative in the form of an Enhanced Pat down for those who are are needlessly afraid of AIT."

Big fan of sexually assaulting children, are you?

Submitted by Anonymous on

i love this waittime feature! yesterday while in line i was asked politely by a woman who was late for her flight to let her through because she was late. it became my problem that she chose to show up 10min before her flight. the tsa said that she couldnt go to the front unless people allowed her to which was the correct desicion. however, the people in front of me allowed her to cut in line. since when is it my problem that someone is going to miss there plane? i applaud the tsa for not escorting her to the front.

Submitted by Anonymous on

before any new technoloy or procedures are implemented by the tsa i think that they should be posted on here for the bloggers to see them and let us give our opinions on them before we let the tsa impliment them as we know what is best.

Submitted by Anonymous on

i wonder how many non-americans go on this blog and laugh about how the american citizens are talking about the tsa a governmental agency and see how 90% of the comments are negative and not constructive.

Submitted by Anonymous on

i think that security should go back to the airlines and private firms where they can stop me from flying for any reason that they want to, as they are a private company that is working for the airlines. im sure that they will keep my safety at the top of the list and not their profit margin.

Submitted by Anonymous on

With regard to the naked body scanners, there were TWO Whole Body Imaging Privacy Impact Statements in 2008, ONE in 2009, and guess what - NONE in 2010.
What does this tell us about the TSA's attitude to privacy? Yeah, that's right they increasingly couldn't care less.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Is the TSA disproportionately under-representative of women and minorities?
Does anyone have any figures about the ethnic and gender diversity of the TSA?

Submitted by Anonymous on

Finally EPIC are soon to have their day in court in early November when they will show what the TSA are REALLY up to. Will the TSA lie under oath? I wonder!

Submitted by RB on

Anonymous said...
Finally EPIC are soon to have their day in court in early November when they will show what the TSA are REALLY up to. Will the TSA lie under oath? I wonder!

September 2, 2010 7:53 PM
...............
DHS/TSA Representatives have lied to the Congress and to the public.

Even Blogger Bob has issues of being truthful on a regular basis.

Nico is the TSA employee who said Whole Body Imager images were safe for young school children to view and suitable for the cover of Reader's Digest.

Why on earth would you expect a different outcome from the most dishonest agency ever invented by the United States government?

TSA can't function without lies.

Submitted by RB on

Full-body scans of passengers to start at Sea-Tac in September

So let me get this straight. I am a Federal Law Enforcement Agent who spent months at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center learning the exact laws that regulate my powers to reasonable search and seizure.

My Agency has Body Scanners in select locations and very strict rules for using them (even though we have the broadest authority by law to search people). In fact we can only legally use them when a suspect consents to the machine.

Yet here we have an Agency that is not Federal Law Enforcement, does not have nearly the training or search authority that I have and they get to use it on any person they see and basically hassle people if they opt out (A pat down with no articuable reason why you are doing it is hassling. And NO, the person not wanting to be photographed essentially naked is not an articuable fact).

I have seen these machines in use and while not photo quality, I would hardly call the images grainy as TSA is saying.

Furthermore, what about my young daughters?

Are we going to have adults looking at their essentially nude images? Illegal last time I checked, and I should know, I have arrested child molestors.

Or are my daughters going to be subjected to a pat down every time they fly until they are 18?

This policy is ridiculous and TSA has it backwards. The bodyscans should be an option for people who consent to it in order to not have to wait in the metal detector line or for people who set off the metal detector but don't want to be patted down they can select a body scan.

Posted on August 18, 2010 at 10:29 PM.

Submitted by Anonymous on

"So if the quote about what the police said is accurate that means the entire article is accurate."

?!?

lol wot?

learn2logic

Submitted by Anonymous on

Can you wear a bullet proof vest as a TSO? I don't mean part of the uniform supplied but if you had one yourself and just wanted to wear it can you? Under your uniform of course lol

Submitted by Anonymous on

So now we have a police officer telling us, clearly on good authority, that the naked scan images are much more graphic than the TSA admits.
Who do you believe: the police or the TSA? Yeah me too!

Submitted by Anonymous on

With regard to privacy and the naked scanners EPIC in their litigation documents against the TSA tell us exactly how little privacy these scanners may give:

Procurement specifications -

3.1.1.1.2 Privacy
'The WBI shall (10) provide image filters to protect the IDENTITY, MODESTY and PRIVACY of the passenger.
Enabling and DISABLING of image filtering shall be MODIFIABLE by users'. That is clear enough. TSA operators can switch off privacy filters whenever they like.

3.1.1.4.2.1 IOCP

(ii) 'Zoom from 1x to 4x.'The detail and clarity of genitals will be extremely clear at x4. Which zoom do we think the scanner operator will choose to use?

TSA Operating Requirements -

'The WBI shall provide ten (10) selectable levels of privacy'. Level one is some privacy, level ten is no privacy at all. Which privacy level do we think the scanner operative will choose?

Don't take my word for the above, it is all there in the litigation documents. This is not security sensitive information as it has been released to EPIC. No wonder the TSA are worried.

Submitted by Bubba on

Bob,

Just another reminder that we are STILL waiting for an answer to that Nature article questioning the science behind SPOT.

Submitted by Anonymous on

"I have long allowed off topic comments."

Good thing. Otherwise, those little round stickers at the TSA security areas soliciting our "feedback" at www.tsa.gov/blog would be frustratingly meaningless. (Tho' as it stands, the stickers are out of date now that the blog has moved.)

But even so, I'm wondering if isn't more appropriate for passenger feedback?

Submitted by Lest We Forget on

First, employees need a way to report behavior, policies or practices that are not criminal, just wrong. The Internal Affairs folks do not deal with anything but criminal offenses. TSA supposedly has an office called Management Inquiry Board to address such issues. It doesn't work. I sent a detailed letter outlining various problems at my airport nearly a year ago. Nothing has ever been done and I've never been contacted regarding my letter.

Second, each airport should have a customer service/standardization liaison who will address problematic workers at that airport. They will work at the airport so they will be able to know the employees and investigate complaints in a timely manner. They should not be selected by or report to the local Airport FSD or his staff. This will ensure they are not part of the good ole boy network and will remain unbiased in their efforts. It will also force accountability and consequences.

Third, TSA headquarters should mandate a certain amount of training on a monthly basis. Too many times I see people not following SOP because of ignorance, not always from laziness or apathy.

I've worked at two different airports in the 5 years I've been with TSA. One was a great environment with quality leadership. The other fails miserably due to poor leadership from the very top. Some means of reporting leadership failure is required for any meaningful change.

Please, please remember that most of the officers you encounter are doing the job because they want to do something positive for their country. Remember that they do not write the rules or have any input to the rules they must enforce.

And finally remember that we deal with negativity and disdain on a daily basis - take a close look at the ranting on this website and get a snapshot of what I deal with ever day. Then, when you encounter those of us who treat your with respect and courtesy, make a point to acknowledge us. How about a few comments about those types of interactions???

Submitted by Anonymous on

RB muttered...
"I am a Federal Law Enforcement Agent"

No way. I don’t believe you. If you are a federal law enforcement officer, I must be the queen of England.

-AJ

Submitted by Anonymous on

Lest we forget ranted...
'When you encounter those of us who treat you with respect and courtesy, make sure make a point to acknowlede us'.
That would be like trying to find a needle in a million haystacks. NO ONE who works for the TSA has any respect or courtesy. Fact.

Submitted by Sandra on

Lest we forget, you should know that those in the upper reaches of the TSA really are not interested in airport security and could give a flyin' fig about you screeners. The only thing they are interested in is themselves and protecting their own jobs.

And now on to another topic, Bob, which I am sure you will ignore as you have ignored so many other comments:

We are reading a great deal about
TSA screeners watching travelers undergoing "enhanced" pat downs, leering and snickering as they do so.

Please address this, how it will be remedied and what we should do if we encounter such behavior on the part of screeners.

And while you are at it, please address the article in Nature about the voodoo practice of your BDOs.

Submitted by Lest We Forget on

Anonymous Said...
"Lest we forget ranted...
'When you encounter those of us who treat you with respect and courtesy, make sure you make a point to acknowlede us'.
That would be like trying to find a needle in a million haystacks. NO ONE who works for the TSA has any respect or courtesy. Fact."

My original post was in two parts, and part one did not make it on the board.

Misguided rants such as yours were the reason I wrote in the first place. If you've not encountered a TSO who has respect or courtesy there are two possible reasons: one, you've not met me; two, your attitude elicits such a response in return.

No matter how rude you'd be to me at my job, I'd still treat you with respect and courtesy. It's just how I do things - I wouldn't let someone like you ruin my day or attitude. I'd never give you that much control over my emotions.

But you should really take a long hard look at your attitude and see if it's possible that much of what you get is based on what you give.

Submitted by GSOLTSO on

RB sez - "So let me get this straight. I am a Federal Law Enforcement Agent who spent months at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center learning the exact laws that regulate my powers to reasonable search and seizure."

Could you post a link to this story? You have never indicated that you are an FLEO before and I would like some info on where this statement came from. Thanks for the info RB!

Anon sez - "So now we have a police officer telling us, clearly on good authority, that the naked scan images are much more graphic than the TSA admits.
Who do you believe: the police or the TSA? Yeah me too!"

I am trying to get the link to this information. I don't think that RB is claiming they are an FLEO, I think they just missed putting the link in the comment.

West
TSA Blog Team

Submitted by GSOLTSO on

Anon sez - "That would be like trying to find a needle in a million haystacks. NO ONE who works for the TSA has any respect or courtesy. Fact."

Your numbers are a bit unrealistic, as there are only about 50,000 (give or take) TSOs nationwide. Many of us are polite, professional and efficient. Many others are courteous, professional and efficient. The vast majority of employees are, at a minimum, courteous and professional, so your analogy would probably be a bit better if it read "Finding a "bad TSO" would be like finding a needle in a haystack.

West
TSA BLog Team

Submitted by RB on

GSOLTSO said...
RB sez - "So let me get this straight. I am a Federal Law Enforcement Agent who spent months at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center learning the exact laws that regulate my powers to reasonable search and seizure."

Could you post a link to this story? You have never indicated that you are an FLEO before and I would like some info on where this statement came from. Thanks for the info RB!

Anon sez - "So now we have a police officer telling us, clearly on good authority, that the naked scan images are much more graphic than the TSA admits.
Who do you believe: the police or the TSA? Yeah me too!"

I am trying to get the link to this information. I don't think that RB is claiming they are an FLEO, I think they just missed putting the link in the comment.

West
TSA Blog Team

September 10, 2010 9:43 AM
.............
What I posted was from the comments of a news article.

I messed up by leaving out the cite and link.

I am not and never have been a FLEO. What I posted was verbatim what the person posted.

If I can recover the original story I will.

Suffice it to say though, TSA has lied about Whole Body Imagers from day one. The images are sexually graphic and border on pornography.

I would say that these images when taken of children would meet any definition of Child Pornography and the WBI machine operators as purveyors of child porn.

The alternative is to have yourself or children sexually assaulted by TSA employees for nothing more than enforcing the right to travel freely.

Tomorrow is the anniversary of September 11, 2001 and sure as the sun will rise we will see TSA employees commemorating the day like they are the saviors of the century.

The truth of the matter is that TSA has caused more damage to this country by their abuse of the Constitution than the terrorist caused on 9/11.

TSA employees who took an oath to defend the Constitution border on being traitors to their country by their actions as public servants.

TSA as now formed is an abomination that must be done away with.

Submitted by RB on

GSOLTSO said...
RB sez - "So let me get this straight. I am a Federal Law Enforcement Agent who spent months at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center learning the exact laws that regulate my powers to reasonable search and seizure."

Could you post a link to this story? You have never indicated that you are an FLEO before and I would like some info on where this statement came from. Thanks for the info RB!

Anon sez - "So now we have a police officer telling us, clearly on good authority, that the naked scan images are much more graphic than the TSA admits.
Who do you believe: the police or the TSA? Yeah me too!"

I am trying to get the link to this information. I don't think that RB is claiming they are an FLEO, I think they just missed putting the link in the comment.

West
TSA Blog Team

September 10, 2010 9:43 AM
..................
Just to clear up the confusion here is the original story with comments.

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/travel/2012663519_bodyscanners19.html


Story Title

Full-body scans of passengers to start at Sea-Tac in September

story body...........

By Carol Pucci

Seattle Times travel writer....

Sea-Tac International Airport passengers will soon begin undergoing full-body scans as the federal government installs equipment that will help identify terrorist threats but poses concerns about privacy, health risks and longer waits in security lines.........

referenced comment: Comments are after the story. Referenced comment in snippet form is first.
...............

Sorry about the confusion.

Submitted by Anonymous on
lest we forget said...


No matter how rude you'd be to me at my job, I'd still treat you with respect and courtesy.

....................................

Unfortunately, due to the lack of effective management, training, and accountability, many TSOs on daily basis are rude, condescending, and frequently know less about their job responsibilities than the passengers they are screening.

As a traveler, I can only be disrespected so many times before I give up on the entire lot of you. I have no desire to enter your screening lines with a smile any more.

You are sleeping in the bed your coworkers made for you.
Submitted by Anonymous on

Hey Ponter --

Even Paris Hilton was allegedly smart enough to figure out a way around a WBI scanner.

Tell me again how this state of the art piece of security theater equipment is going to "keep us safe?"

Or do you think Paris is way ahead of the "bad guys" we are truly targeting in the cleverness department?

CNN Article

Submitted by George on

@West: Many of us are polite, professional and efficient. Many others are courteous, professional and efficient. The vast majority of employees are, at a minimum, courteous and professional, so your analogy would probably be a bit better if it read "Finding a "bad TSO" would be like finding a needle in a haystack.

While your statement about the majority of TSOs is probably true, the reality is that enough TSOs are neither polite nor courteous nor professional to give a large (and continually growing) number of people a very negative view of the TSA. The fact that the "bad TSOs" continue to screen passengers daily only reinforces that negative view. It shows that your bosses either don't care, or worse they consider having bullies among the screeners beneficial.

And even the polite, professional, and efficient TSOs have to enforce rules that make no sense to many passengers. Even though they're enforcing those rules conscientiously, they do it inconsistently because even the people who train them can't seem to agree on the details. And they now have to subject passengers to humiliating, extremely intrusive, and possibly even painful "pat downs," possibly because their bosses have decided that passengers need to be "actively encouraged" to accept the strip search scanners.

In a way I very much pity the "courteous, professional and efficient" TSOs, which I'll assume describes you. You have an inherently thankless job that involves inflicting intrusive and seemingly pointless hassles on people who have ample reason to despise and distrust you and your agency, and who have ample reason to expect a negative experience. That environment can't be good, either for TSOs or for effective security. But your bosses apparently don't want to change anything.

Finding needles in a haystack is very easy if you have a magnet. I guess some of us are magnets for "bad TSOs."

Submitted by Anonymous on

How about commenting on the fact that the latest New York Times article on the full body scans has almost all comments with negative content? Many comments include descriptions of being coerced into the machines even after opting out. Others correctly point out that the scanners don't work for what they are supposed to work for.

Submitted by Sandra on

Anonymous wrote: "....Others correctly point out that the scanners don't work for what they are supposed to work for."

As evidenced by this:

http://www.avionews.com/index.php?corpo=see_news_home.php&news_id=112068...

"...In particular, beyond a lack of accuracy and a certain ease in going haywire, as detected by the operators,..."

Looks to me as if we have another FAIL on our hands.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Dear TSA,
It is not enough that you have taken three TSA-approved locks off my luggage. Now my phone charger has disappeared out of my bag, and in its place is a "Notice of Baggage Inspection" paper. It is not worth my time to fill out the claims paperwork and wait 2 years for the government (using taxpayer money) to reimburse me $8 for a new charger.

Submitted by Anonymous on

A month later, and still no meaningful comment on the woman you arrested and wrongfully accused of embezzling money from her husband for flying with checks?

How about a statement on how much in money and checks we can expect to fly with before you imprison us and steal it?

Air travel is getting unbelievably expensive, but you take our money away when we try to fly with it?

Submitted by Bubba on

Back in May, the foremost scientific journal in the World, Nature, published an extensive article about the lack of science behind SPOT. We still have heard no response from the TSA. They are sure trying to push it under the rug!

Unfortunately for them, I didn't forget, and will continue to remind everyone periodically.

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