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Friday, July 02, 2010
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I have long allowed off topic comments. However, after many complaints from folks who would understandably like to stay on the subject, I am providing this post as a place to comment things that are way off topic with the current post.

I’ve added a link to this post on our sidebar so people will know to post off topic comments here.

You now have the option of subscribing to posts, so you’ll be able to keep up with the comments here if you so choose. So it’s not as if your comment is being exiled to the land of forgotten comments. We’ll be paying attention, and you can stay up to date with an RSS feed.

As much as we’d like to hear about your synchronized swimming club, I ask that all comments posted here remain TSA focused and adhere to TSA’s comment policy.

Bob Burns
TSA Blog Team

Comments

Submitted by Sandra on

Bob, why was a woman forced to take off her shirt in front of two of your screeners?

Submitted by Anonymous on

Bob,

The story of the woman forced to take off her shirt is very serious.

You have been informed of a potential sexual assault. You are morally and likely legally obligated to follow up and advance this up the chain of command.

You also have an obligation to the traveling public to make a public statement on this situation.

Submitted by Anonymous on

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-504083_162-20004436-504083.html

A TSA worker was mocked mercilessly by his co-workers for OVER A YEAR after having to go through one of the "naked machines" as a part of training. And not just any co-workers -- his *supervisor* was doing it too.

Can someone explain why those of us who are passengers should feel comfortable about this? Has the supervisor been fired?

Submitted by Anonymous on

X-Ray dosage is measured relative to total body mass.
As AIT X-Rays are low voltage 25-30KvP, they only penetrate about 1/4" of skin. Because all the x-rays are absorbed in this 1/4", the ACTUAL dose may be 100 times or more than advertised.

Read this letter from renowned scientists in the field:

http://www.npr.org/assets/news/2010/05/17/concern.pdf

Wait for the lawsuits for breast and testicular cancers as well as cataracts.
TSA won't have any legal defense, and will pay pay pay to quiet it down.

Meanwhile - Don't forget to OPT-OUT of the Nude-O-Scopes!
Take the pat-down. Ask for a private room. Make the TSO's work for a living.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Just another indication that we lost the war on terror. The Taliban was successful in forcing us to change our way of life. The airport experience has gotten absurdly awful and the erosion of rights in general has been devastating. They did what Hitler couldn't do: they struck our shores and forced a change of life.

Submitted by Anonymous on

The irony of the 3D scanners is that Muslims are going to opt to get pat down by a same-gender TSA agent. That means that the only people getting scanned are non-Muslims. Of course, once the non-Muslims see that Muslims aren't going through the scanners and are opting for the pat-down method, you may see some non-Muslims opting for this method. If, eventually, everyone opts for this method, it would render the scanners obsolete.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Anonymous said...

'Meanwhile -Don't forget to OPT-OUT of the Nude-o-Scopes!'

I completely agree.

'Take the pat-down. Ask for a private room. Make the TSO work for a living'.

I think it would be better to have the grope-down in public. Lots of witnesses would make taking legal action for sexual assault much easier. If a grope-down is done in private, then any sexual assault is your word against the TSO's.
Insist that the grope-down is publicly witnessed.

Submitted by Anonymous on

There is no real way to validate what level of scanning is being done by the TSA. Example images on placards at the airport only show what the government want normal people and potential terrorists to see. If terrorists knew exactly how much scanning was occurring, they could adapt likewise. Therefore, it is implausible to expect the TSA to be honest about how high the scanning level is set. In effect, the TSA will feed the general public propaganda to stop the enemy from being more diligent in their stealth.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Regarding this incident:

http://www.tampabay.com/news/transportation/airport-body-scanners-reveal...

Because people are new to this technology and unaware of its implications, I recommend the following changes to SOP, effective immediately. Otherwise, serious opposition overall will mount.

1. Scanning children under 18 is forbidden without specific PERMISSION of the parent or accompanying adult. Unaccompanied minors would need WRITTEN PERMISSION.

2. SHOW EACH PASSENGER the sample images and TELL EACH PASSENGER that it will show them naked, like the picture. Also TELL EACH PASSENGER "USE OF THIS TECHNOLOGY IS OPTIONAL". Make sure you get their consent, head nod or verbal.

3. Make adequate provision for OPT-OUTS.

Submitted by Anonymous on

George said:
"And even the polite, professional, and efficient TSOs have to enforce rules that make no sense to many passengers. Even though they're enforcing those rules conscientiously, they do it inconsistently because even the people who train them can't seem to agree on the details. And they now have to subject passengers to humiliating, extremely intrusive, and possibly even painful "pat downs," possibly because their bosses have decided that passengers need to be "actively encouraged" to accept the strip search scanners"

so even when professional tsa agents take your items away you are going to be happy about it? it is a thankless job and no matter how they perform it you are going to be upset with your items being taken so they will seem rude to you. how do you determine who is pprofessional and who is rude when the person is doing there job and you are angry about it? its a no win for the passenger or the tsa agent. cut them some slack.

Submitted by RB on

Anonymous said...
Anonymous said...

'Meanwhile -Don't forget to OPT-OUT of the Nude-o-Scopes!'

I completely agree.

'Take the pat-down. Ask for a private room. Make the TSO work for a living'.

I think it would be better to have the grope-down in public. Lots of witnesses would make taking legal action for sexual assault much easier. If a grope-down is done in private, then any sexual assault is your word against the TSO's.
Insist that the grope-down is publicly witnessed.

September 17, 2010 7:04 PM
.................
Opt Out yes.

Pat Down yes

Private room, NO.

Make TSA assault you in public.

Let others see what disgusting things TSA employees are forcing on the citizens of the United States.

Submitted by GSOLTSO on

The enhanced pat down, is not an assault of any kind. It is simply a method used to clear an individual for threat items. This is not the same type of pat down used when you enter a prison system (trust me, it isn't even close to the pat down done by Johnny Law when they arrest someone). Any other commentary stating otherwise is simply wrong. We have to screen all passengers before we can allow them to enter the secured area, and this is simply the method used when someone opts out of screening with AIT. We will always have some people (for whatever reason) that will be unable/unwilling to complete the process in the AIT. The enhanced pat down is simply the method used to clear those folks that opt out. It is not punitive, or used to coerce (unlike many have said here), it is simply used to prevent folks from carrying threat items on their person.

West
TSA Blog Team

Submitted by Anonymous on
GSOLTSO said...

The enhanced pat down, is not an assault of any kind.
________________

So, West, you are saying:

A) The many reports of genital contact being reported is not assault

or

B) IF a TSO conducts an inappropriate pat down they are merely not complying with the SOP and what happened was not an “enhanced pat down?"

Which is it?
________________

GSOLTSO said...
The enhanced pat down is simply the method used to clear those folks that opt out. It is not punitive, or used to coerce (unlike many have said here), it is simply used to prevent folks from carrying threat items on their person.
________________

That’s an awful big statement, West.

Anyone who works in an organization should realize that variation occurs, people screw up, and bad apples exist.

Some passengers are claiming they are treated harshly by TSOs who are not familiar with the right of passengers to opt out, or are harassed and significantly delayed when they do so.

Instead of acknowledging that there may be problems out there on the checkpoints and that your organization will continue to fix issues as they occur -- you take the low road and call out honest folk who complain about how they felt they were treated as liars.

How does your blanket statement generate public trust in your organization, specifically from those who travel through TSA checkpoints and realize all isn't rosy?
Submitted by Anonymous on

West,

Just because you say it, doesn't make it true.

Submitted by Anonymous on

The TSA describes the grabbing and squeezing of passengers testicles as 'simply a method of clearing passengers'. The rest of us would describe it as sexual assault.

Submitted by RB on

GSOLTSO said...
The enhanced pat down, is not an assault of any kind. It is simply a method used to clear an individual for threat items. This is not the same type of pat down used when you enter a prison system (trust me, it isn't even close to the pat down done by Johnny Law when they arrest someone). Any other commentary stating otherwise is simply wrong. We have to screen all passengers before we can allow them to enter the secured area, and this is simply the method used when someone opts out of screening with AIT. We will always have some people (for whatever reason) that will be unable/unwilling to complete the process in the AIT. The enhanced pat down is simply the method used to clear those folks that opt out. It is not punitive, or used to coerce (unlike many have said here), it is simply used to prevent folks from carrying threat items on their person.

West
TSA Blog Team
................
Are you claiming that TSA is not using an open hand, palm forward to feel the genital areas of people?

That my friend is sexual assault.

Submitted by Anonymous on

"The enhanced pat down, is not an assault of any kind."

West, you don't hesitate to tell us what the pat down is not.

Please tell us what the enhanced pat down IS.

So far TSA has refused to do that.

We have no way of knowing when TSA is exceeding the legal limits of the manhandling and groping we are subject to.

We have no way of knowing when you are committing the crime of sexually assaulting us under the cover of authority.

This is unconscionable.

Submitted by Anonymous on

"It is not punitive, or used to coerce (unlike many have said here), it is simply used to prevent folks from carrying threat items on their person."

BY fondling their genitals, which makes it sexual assault.

Submitted by The Truth on

Shame on you all for forgetting why TSA is here. What they need is a video playing above all checkpoints from that day so all of you smart mouths will remember.

Submitted by AK on

I would like to know why there are no signs at the airport security checkpoint telling passengers to take off their shoes, despite this being perhaps the most bothersome action they are required to perform. In my experience the officer has to convey this information orally slowing down the queue. Furthermore the English word "shoe" is ambiguous, meaning either footwear with a sole or all footwear (the TSA means the latter, but the officer will react impatiently if you interpret the former). Surely a sign would solve these problems?

Submitted by George on

@The truth: Shame on you all for forgetting why TSA is here.

We haven't forgotten why TSA is here. The "intelligence community" failed catastrophically on 9/11. So the Bush administration created a secretive, unaccountable bureaucracy to bamboozle us into believing that the Government was now doing something about it. That's its visible function, but its primary, largely invisible Mission is to make sure that nobody ever gets held accountable for these failures in the future. Costly and aggressive bottom-covering is more politically expedient than holding the bureaucracts accountable for working effectively.

Because that bureaucracy is secretive and unaccountable, they have unlimited power to erode freedom and privacy when it gets in their way. Their latest secretive and unaccountable decision was giving TSOs license to "pat down" passengers in a fashion that anywhere else would be considered sexual assault. But TSA checkpoints are an Alice in Wonderland world where rules that apply elsewhere in the universe are turned topsy-turvy, and vary considerably with the whims of TSOs. So at checkpoints, touching passengers' genitals is not a sexual assault and it's not punitive. It's just a "method," and it's necessary and justified for reasons that, for the usual National Security reasons, we must never know. Anyone who claims they've been treated punitively is therefore lying.

What they need is a video playing above all checkpoints from that day so all of you smart mouths will remember.

I'm surprised TSA management hasn't installed video monitors above the checkpoints playing a loop of the falling Towers and burning victims. There's nothing more effective than FEAR to make people willing, even eager, to surrender their freedom, privacy, and (now) even bodily integrity in exchange for sweetly whispered assurances that "We need to squeeze your testicles to keep you safe. Trust us."

Submitted by Sandra on

West, the problem with your response is that not every single traveler who does not go through WBI gets the full-on grope.

If the grope is nothing but punishment for refusing NoS, then all passengers not going through the NoS would be subjected to it.

Further, passengers deserve to be told what to expect in the grope: is squeezing of the genitals SOP or not? If we don't know that, when we don't know if the person who screens us is going beyond the SOP for the "enhanced" grope.

Since TSA will not tell us what to expect in such a grope, my advice to all passengers who experience such is to file a complaint against the screener for sexual assault. Once the TSA has been faced with enough of these complaints, perhaps they will set a standard and advise passengers what that standard is.

Submitted by Anonymous on

You stole my theme-park purchased SNOW GLOBE today. Why would I check the 'banned' list to see if theme park souvenirs are banned? I don't check to make sure theme park souvenir hats are banned either.

The agent really got off on making me cry while he was stealing one of my husband's birthday presents.

Well, no more flying for me - I'm done. I didn't know that the terrorists had taken control of the snow globe manufacturers. It's really dangerous out there! Flying is dumb, given all the danger!

Submitted by Anonymous on

GSOLTSO said...
The enhanced pat down, is not an assault of any kind. It is simply a method used to clear an individual for threat items.
------------------------------------------

I think it's time that someone explained to you the concept of mutual exclusivity. You see, "an assault" and "a method used to clear an individual for threat items" are not mutually exclusive. It's a bit like a cannibalistic serial killer telling you, "This isn't murder in any sense. It is simply a method used to secure my dinner."

Also, I'd like to echo other commenters who have pointed out the absurdity of debating a procedure that you have announced and defended but refused to define.

Submitted by TSM West on

George said
We haven't forgotten why TSA is here. The "intelligence community" failed catastrophically on 9/11. So the Bush administration created a secretive, unaccountable bureaucracy to bamboozle us into believing that the Government was now doing something about it. That's its visible function, but its primary, largely invisible Mission is to make sure that nobody ever gets held accountable for these failures in the future. Costly and aggressive bottom-covering is more politically expedient than holding the bureaucracts accountable for working effectively.
-----------------------------------
You may be partially right about the intellegence community. But if you look at the time line for the creation of TSA you will see a second attempt on aviation that very possibly the intellegence community may not have known about. Plus the screening processes in place at the time weren't working.

09/11/2001 No need to tell you what that day was

12/22/2001 Richard Reid. Old screening processes were used at that time. As much as you want to say Reids attempt failed, the fact still remains that he got explosives on an airplane under the old screening processes.

02/17/2002 TSA Assumed responsibility for Airport Screening

09/19/2002 TSA met the deadline to federalize 429 commercial airports with 59000 screeners.

TSA Screening isn't just to protect lives from another terrorist attack, it's also there to help protect the economy. After 9/11 we all watched the stock market crash. Another similar attack could possibly create a worse crash in the economy that may or may not rebound. If another attempt is ever successful on aviation you could quite possibly see the airline industry completely go out of business. Personnaly I work for the Government, so I don't get paid enough to invest in the stock market. With this country's economy I don't think we could survive another but thats just my opinion.

Submitted by HappyToHelp on

@ George
It didn’t take a government conspiracy to make TSA. Congress constructed title 49 and that’s what TSA is doing. If you don’t agree with the applicable laws, you will need to get them changed. Saying that TSA is busy work is far from true, and is a failed illogical statement. If you think HQ, TSOC, and over 400 airports are run in this manner, you are sadly mistaken. Don’t let a few bad screening experiences cloud your judgment.
What is this about fear? The government is trying to control me!!! Who is using fear hear? TSA talks about terrorism because it directly relates to what we do. You talk about government control because….?? Sounds like something right out of a book about the New World Order (NWO).

Tim
TSA Blog Team

Submitted by HappyToHelp on

@ "RB", "Anonymous"
So now the voluntary enhanced pat down is sexual assault? Is this just like the claim that family lanes are going to cost TSA millions in discrimination lawsuits? (looking at you Sandra)

This reminds me of the progression of Advanced Imaging Machines. They started out as whole body imagers, then virtual strip searches, and then they were called actual strip searches, now RB calls them child-porn machines.

If you guys ever want to go through the pat-down, both AIT and Walk-Through Metal Detectors are optional. Just opt-out and receive your pat-down. Your experience will vary.

Happy travels,

Tim
TSA Blog Team

Submitted by Anonymous on

It has now been 14 months since the last Whole Body Imaging Privacy Impact Assessment ( July 23 2009). The TSA refuses to publish a new up-dated version because it knows that their continuing erosion of passengers civil liberties and privacy will be exposed. If they just stick to the old 2009 PIA then they can continue to erode privacy and civil libertities without much challenge. How very democratic.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Tim, TSA Blog Team said...
'If you guys want to go through the pat-down, both AIT and Walk-Through Metal Detectors are optional. Just opt-out and receive your pat-down. YOUR EXPERIENCE WILL VARY'.
Now that sounds ominous. Why will the screening experience you are subjected to vary? You are clearly saying some people will be treated sensitively and fairly, while others will be punitively assaulted. The screening EXPERIENCE, not the actual screening method, should be the SAME for every law abiding passenger. Why are some people treated differently?

Submitted by Anonymous on

Tim said, "now the voluntary enhanced pat down is sexual assault?"

Tim, the problem is that you will not provide us with the information to know if what you are doing to any one of us crosses the line to sexual assault or not.

You will not tell us what the 'enhanced' pat down is.

We do not know what your limits are. If any.

You will be having very intimate physical contact with us that most people would not allow from a stranger.

We have no way of knowing if you are carrying out your job, or using your authority as cover to improperly touch us.

Submitted by George on

@HappyToHelp: Don’t let a few bad screening experiences cloud your judgment.

If I shouldn't judge the TSA based on my personal experience with representatives of your agency, on what basis should I judge it? Would it be better to rely on a more objective source, such as the GAO? The GAO consistently shows that the TSA gives us little if any actual security in exchange for what it costs us (in taxpayer dollars as well as in freedom and privacy). The GAO also shows that there has been little if any improvement in the TSA's effectiveness and cost-effectiveness in the years it has been operating, possibly because TSA management consistently exercises their sacred prerogative to ignore the GAO.

As for the "applicable laws," do you mean that Congress has legislated all the requirements about shoes and liquids that are (arbitrarily and inconsistently) enforced on us at checkpoints? And does a law of Congress give TSOs authority to "pat down" passengers in a fashion that would constitute sexual assault anywhere else? Has Congress mandated the secrecy of your procedures, to ensure that we can never know either the rules or when TSOs violate them?

You may indeed be happy to help, by reiterating the official TSA position. But being constrained your agency's obsessive secrecy, the only response you can offer to any substantive concerns is "That's classified/SSI." I'm afraid that won't change my opinion of the TSA formed by "bad screening experiences" (which TSA management clearly tolerates and possibly encourages), along with the GAO reports. And even the good screening experiences raise questions about whether the absurd rules are either necessary or effective, which you can answer only with "trust us."

No "conspiracy theories" are needed. The TSA is merely doing what any bureaucracy naturally does when it's granted secrecy and exemption from independent oversight and accountability.

Submitted by Sandra on

Tim, fear is the nectar of the gods to the TSA and without it, your agency would shrivel up and die.

Submitted by Jen on

My birthday is coming up this weekend and my driver's license expires on my birthday. I went to renew my license today and they gave me a temporary paper license and affixed it to my old one, and also cut off the end of the expiration date. I am flying on business on Saturday and I don't have a passport. Will I be able to fly?

Submitted by TSM West on

Bob, why are my comments not being posted.

Over the last couple of weeks i posted comments and they were never posted.

On 9/20 I responded to George and you did not post it. It wasn't off topic, especially since the comments were for the off topic post. None of what I cemmented is SSI or offensive. It pretty much discussed the time line of TSA's creation.

Submitted by RB on

The screening EXPERIENCE, not the actual screening method, should be the SAME for every law abiding passenger. Why are some people treated differently?

September 21, 2010 3:19 PM
.......................
If a person Opt Outs of E-Strip they receive a retalitory screening. There is no other explanation and proves TSA is operating outside of the law.

Submitted by RB on

HappyToHelp said...
@ "RB", "Anonymous"
So now the voluntary enhanced pat down is sexual assault? Is this just like the claim that family lanes are going to cost TSA millions in discrimination lawsuits? (looking at you Sandra)

This reminds me of the progression of Advanced Imaging Machines. They started out as whole body imagers, then virtual strip searches, and then they were called actual strip searches, now RB calls them child-porn machines.

If you guys ever want to go through the pat-down, both AIT and Walk-Through Metal Detectors are optional. Just opt-out and receive your pat-down. Your experience will vary.

Happy travels,

Tim
TSA Blog Team

September 21, 2010 7:22 AM
...................
Does the name Negrin come to mind Tim?

IF the images are as tame as TSA claims then why the refusal to post actual images?

Prove to the public that Strip Search Machines are the same as child porn images.

Ball is in your court Tim.

Submitted by RB on

HappyToHelp said...
@ George
It didn’t take a government conspiracy to make TSA. Congress constructed title 49 and that’s what TSA is doing.
................

Tim it's ashame that you have lost all perspective.

What congress authorized was for TSA to screen for WEI using an administrative search no more in extensive than required for that purpose.

TSA has exceeded that by miles.

Also, every other government agency has to comply with rule making that allows public comments and discussion before some new rule is made, but not TSA. TSA doens't even comply with standing Administrative Act rule making provisions as it is.

TSA is out of control and at this point little is left except to disband the agency, return screening oversight to the FAA where it belongs and start over fresh.

TSA senior employees belong in prison not drawing a paycheck from the government.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Question to the TSA blog team:

Why are sniffer dogs not used to search passengers for concealed explosive substances? Surely if they can easily be trained to detect drugs, then why are they not trained to detect explosive substances, such as PETN?
If sniffer dogs were used you would not need the naked scanners, just an ordinary pat-down and metal detectors.

Submitted by Blogger Bob on

TSM West - We haven't deleted any of your comments. Not sure what's going on...

Blogger Bob
TSA Blog Team

Submitted by Anonymous on

Tim said: "[saying] TSA is busy work is far from true, and is a failed illogical statement."

I see what you did there. Clever!

A failed illogical statement would would be a logical statement.

So you agree with the comment! :)

Submitted by George on

@RB: If a person Opt Outs of E-Strip they receive a retalitory screening.

But Bob and West say that the pat down is not retaliatory. It's merely a "method." It's also not sexual assault. That's the official TSA position, authorized for public distribution.

Of course, stating this official position doesn't mean that, when implemented by TSOs whose training, competence, and attitude toward the public are inconsistent and variable, the pat down won't become retaliatory sexual abuse. There is very often a disconnect between what official "should" or "should not" happen, as stated here by the TSA's Propaganda Department, and what actually occurs at the checkpoint.

While we can't know what actually goes on behind the TSA's thick curtain of secrecy, by all appearances TSA management doesn't care about that disconnect. Alternatively, as the Propaganda Department makes a point of letting us know that "unpredictability" is a vitally important layer of TSA security, it's possible that they actually encourage this disconnect because it somehow benefits security.

Regardless of what the real (secret) intent and procedures say, some people perceive the pat down as retaliatory and/or a sexual assault. We may see this perception as a problem that can't be good for security. But it's conceivable that the bosses behind the curtain (with access to the Latest Robust Intelligence) believe that the perception benefits security.

The idea that encouraging the public to hate the TSA somehow benefits security makes no sense to me, but much of what the TSA does makes no sense. It presumably does make sense to the people behind the curtain, for reasons we must never know. Either that or they're just making lame excuses for systematic incompetence. When everything is behind a curtain of secrecy, it's difficult to tell the difference.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Tim has us reaching for our tinfoil hats talking about "New World Order" and other boogie men.

Tim could you please leave your straw men* out in left field where they belong?

Many of your recent posts have gone on about things that the commenter quite simply did not say.

Why do you exaggerate and make things up?

It only adds to the noise and is not helpful in moving the discussion forward. Please stop it.

Thanks.

*The Straw Man fallacy is committed when a person simply ignores a person's actual position and substitutes a distorted, exaggerated or misrepresented version of that position.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Sandra said...
"Tim, fear is the nectar of the gods to the TSA and without it, your agency would shrivel up and die."

That is why West's signature over at Flyertalk is so amusing.

"Fear profits a man nothing."

Now there is a man with a wicked sense of humor!

Submitted by Ayn R Key on

West wrote:
The enhanced pat down, is not an assault of any kind. It is simply a method used to clear an individual

for threat items. ... The enhanced pat down is simply the method used to clear those folks that opt out. It

is not punitive, or used to coerce (unlike many have said here), it is simply used to prevent folks from

carrying threat items on their person.

I know that you are required to say that. And if I ask

you if you are required to say that, you are required to answer that you are not. So I won't bother with

that question.

But I do wonder if you feel any pangs of conscience when you repeat the company line.

Submitted by Anonymous on

This language is from the instructions for black diamond lane travelers on the TSA website:

"DO: put your shoes and coat in the first bin and any carry-on bags in other bins. Then after your bins go through the x-ray, you can slip your shoes and coat on while waiting for your other items to come out."

There are at least two things in these instructions that will get a passenger reprimanded by the bag monitor!

Submitted by HappyToHelp on

@ Anonymous September 21, 2010 3:19 PM
Transportation Security Officers explain what they are going to do before we perform secondary screenings. The individual in secondary screening is informed before any procedures take place. The individual is also informed they have an option to have their screening done in a private area/room. If you feel the officer has done anything inappropriate, you can talk to their supervisor. As far as reading the manual to insure your officer followed the book, not going to happen. Sorry :(

Tim
TSA Blog Team

Submitted by HappyToHelp on

@ Anonymous September 22, 2010 8:43 AM
TSA does use canine explosive teams nationally. You can read all about them on our website.

Explosive Detection canine teams are not substitutes for AIT.

Tim
TSA Blog Team

Submitted by HappyToHelp on

@ RB
I think you have been hanging out with Spiff too much. TSA works closely with Congress. The Behavior Detection Officer (BDO) program is an example of this. DHS also works closely with Congress, and got us funds for more AIT machines. TSA cannot do what it does without Congress.

I can’t really answer your false accusations RB. According to you TSA is a lawless scheming super agency, but is somehow incompetent. Which is it?

I know you advocate for the end of TSA. Just to let you know. TSA isn’t going anywhere.

Tim
TSA Blog Team

Submitted by HappyToHelp on

@ Sandra
TSA is not the boogeyman. I also checked my Federal Security Director for tubes, and he does not run off of nectar.

Tim
TSA Blog Team

Submitted by HappyToHelp on

@ George
When has TSA ignored the GAO? Do you not read the statements at the bottom of those reports? Each item brought up by the GAO is responded to by TSA, and is followed up. The GAO also follows up to make sure progress is moving forward. This is how government works. GAO finds something, TSA corrects it. The GAO reports back to Congress. It is a never ending cycle until there are no more problems (there is always going to be problems).

Tim
TSA Blog Team

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