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The Importance of Getting to the Gate Early

Friday, February 10, 2012
airport

You may have read in the news today about a woman who missed her flight because there weren’t any female officers to screen her. As in most cases, there is more to this story. Read on...

In TSA’s smaller airports, we work closely with the airlines and airport to keep the security checkpoints open to make certain that all passengers are screened appropriately. Once TSA is informed by the airline that our screening services are no longer needed, the security checkpoint is closed.

Recently, a passenger attempted to access the checkpoint after it had closed. The airline had already made final boarding announcements and notified TSA that no additional passengers would be accepted. A TSA officer made two additional public announcements asking for any remaining passengers to report to the security checkpoint for screening. After both the flight and checkpoint were closed, a female passenger requested screening. Even though the checkpoint was already closed, our officer told the passenger he would attempt to recall a female officer to screen her, but was informed by the airline that she would not be able to board.

Yes, it is standard procedure for us to provide same-gender pat-downs when needed; however, in this instance, the airline had made final boarding announcements and notified TSA that no additional passengers would be accepted. This is why it is so important to arrive early, at least an hour before your departure when possible at smaller airports and two at larger ones to ensure you make your flight.

When possible, TSA makes every effort to accommodate a passenger’s request.

Bob Burns
TSA Blog Team

If you’d like to comment on an unrelated topic you can do so in our Off Topic Comments post. You can also view our blog post archives or search our blog to find a related topic to comment in. If you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer, you can contact a Customer Support Manager at the airport you traveled, or will be traveling through by using Talk to TSA.

Comments

Submitted by Anonymous on

You should do a post entitled "The Importance of Getting the TSA out of the Security Business."

Submitted by Anonymous on

From what I remember, aren't the checkpoints supposed to be open until the flight PUSHES BACK from the gate?

Submitted by RB on

What would have happened if the airplane had pushed back but later had to return to the gate?

Who from TSA would have been available to handle any passengers who ended up needing to be screened?

If the airport is open then TSA checkpoints need to be manned and ready.

Submitted by David Jones on

I agree about 'getting to the game early', but do TSA officials take into account the additional time the elderly ann seniors might need to get through security or is it purely first come / first serve?

Submitted by Anonymous on

Or maybe you lot could adequately staff your gropepoints. You DO realize that gender is a protected class, and that you refused to serve someone because of her gender, right, Curtis?

Submitted by Anonymous on

It is good to hear the whole story!

Submitted by Anonymous on

So, Bob, you're claiming she's lying?

http://www.kdvr.com/news/kdvr-no-female-tsa-agents-means-no-flight-for-d...

"She said she checked in and arrived at security about 35 minutes before the scheduled departure of her United flight.

“They asked if I was on the flight to Denver, I said yes, they said that they couldn`t screen me because they sent all the female TSA agents home,” Winning said."

According to that, she was there 35 minutes before the flight. Also, there is no mention of being late, just that the TSA had no female sceeners.

Submitted by Russell on

Hi Bob,

There are probably thousands of TSA protocols already in place. The TSA is already wasting the tax payer's money so why not add a rule that states, one member of each sex must be present at any given time.

Also, and in reference my previous comment, watch out for pie filling! Based on volume it's surely more dangerous than the confiscated cupcake. But pies are allowed through? Sorry Bob but the government isn't giving you much of a leg to stand on.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Still nothing about the insulin pump fiasco.

Submitted by @SkyWayManAz on

What's clear is someone isn't being truthful here. TSA has been caught many times being less then truthful. The JFK elderly strip searches that were repeatedly denied on this blog come to mind. Also right or wrong on the part of Sen. Rand your agency still denies detaining him. He wasn't free to leave for the better part of an hour so thesaurus new speak alternate wording is a little stale. In this case the passenger claims she was at security 35 minutes early. If there is security footage of the screening area that should make or break your claim.

Submitted by Anonymous on

So the TSA felt - after a careful review of airline schedules - that only male TSOs were needed? Were there male-only flights here?

Time to get rid of the TSA's Constitution destroying mission and replace it with competent security.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Where's the video with the timestamp? That may clear things up. Stating she wasn't at the checkpoint until her flight was closed, which is 10 minutes prior to departure, should be verifiable as fact with video.

I

Submitted by Anonymous on

It doesn't make any difference if the person was late for the flight or not - if the airport is open then the checkpoint should be properly staffed.

There are many other possible reasons that someone may have to enter the airport.

You just make yourselves look even worse when you try and justify an obvious TSA failure.

Submitted by Anonymous on

No Bob, you guys don't set the hours. The flight had not departed yet. TSA doesn't understand its own policies, film at 11.

Submitted by RB on

Anyone else notice a pattern?

TSA employees steal stuff, passengers fault for putting valuables in their luggage.

Senator tries to go to Washington to vote and TSA detains them illegally yet it is the Senators fault for trying to travel by air.

Lady tries to clear security and TSA doesn't properly staff a checkpoint and it is the ladies fault that TSA is incompetent.

TSA is never at fault!

...............................
All postings submitted to the TSA Blog, a government propaganda activity, are done so in full acknowledgement that "Free Speech is a Right" and cannot be infringe upon as detailed in the First Amendment of the United States Constitution and upheld by numerous Supreme Court decisions.

Any violation of this right by TSA, an agency of the United States, and its employees is a willful Civil Rights violation and actionable.

Submitted by Tramky on

This tale doesn't sound like a Federal agency devoted to, well, the security of the nation. It sounds like a small-town night watchman business run by a bunch of rubes. How ridiculous.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Many times passengers come to the airport with only minutes left to board. TSA has been the security checkpoint prior to boarding a plane for over 10 years. The standard has always been - arrive early to get through the security checkpoint in order to be at the gate 20-30 minutes prior to boarding!!!!!!!
People want TSA to look bad no matter what - BOTTOM LINE> NO PLANES HAVE BEEN ATTACKED OR DESTROYED SINCE TSA SECURITY HAS BEEN IN PLACE!! Take your pick people...no security to get on a plane or one in a while BURPS! which are caused by people who think they are more important than anyone else flying!!!

Submitted by Anonymous on

So when you have to pay payroll to hundreds of checkpoint staffers at JFK for the hours the airport is open before the first flight and after the last flight, you're NOT gonna cry out about the waste?

In this case it doesn't matter whether there were any females or not. The airline said they were not accepting any more passengers, that the flight was closed. Anyone hear SkyWest deny that?

While I agree there have been times in the past when TSA dropped the ball, we can't blame them for EVERY thing. Different airlines at different airports have different rules about when a flight closes. I have seen flights close and take off 30 minuted before the scheduled departure time, especially small regional flights, and where weather can be an issue (like Denver).

Let's hear from SkyWest - was she late, or is TSA cutting you off from your customers?

Submitted by Anonymous on

"I offered to sign a waiver to let a male screener check me, but they wouldn’t do it," Winning said. "I asked, 'If I was a man I could get on [the plane], but because I'm a woman I can't?' And he said, 'Yes, that's correct.’"

Given the history of "truthiness" the TSA has, I'm inclined to believe this statement over anything the TSA has to say about it.

Submitted by Anonymous on

What's clear is someone isn't being truthful here. TSA has been caught many times being less then truthful.
And so have many of the flying Public!!! No one should blame anyone just see how it can be fixed next time. Sometimes things happen. It might have been TSA's or the airlines fault. No one really will ever no for sure, so whats the point in talking about that anymore.

Submitted by Anonymous on

"It doesn't make any difference if the person was late for the flight or not - if the airport is open then the checkpoint should be properly staffed."
Airports are open all night. It does not mean security is there all night.
So you kinda just make yourself look bad when you have no clue what really happens at all airports.

Submitted by Anonymous on

" Anonymous said...
From what I remember, aren't the checkpoints supposed to be open until the flight PUSHES BACK from the gate?

February 10, 2012 5:09 PM"
----------------
Some airports do this. Some close the CP once the flight has boarded and the airline tells TSA that they are done. Some airports don't want to pay the exit monitors (when it's not TSA for example) to sit there if the last flight is closed. If there is a delay and the flight has to come back the passengers are told that they are not to leave the departure lounge or they will not be able to return.
Evidently this is what happened here.

Submitted by Anonymous on

" RB said...
What would have happened if the airplane had pushed back but later had to return to the gate?

Who from TSA would have been available to handle any passengers who ended up needing to be screened?

If the airport is open then TSA checkpoints need to be manned and ready.

February 10, 2012 5:25 PM"
---------------
Checkpoint was manned and ready. Lady left the area AFTER she was screened and the flight was delayed. Delayed flights can leave at any time. Announcements were made. She either missed hearing them (outside smoking perhaps) or chose to ignore them. Air carrier told TSA there were no more passengers being accepted through. TSA started to close down. females went home. If there is any blame at all, try blaming the passenger who thought through her typical sense of entitlement that she could go through after 3 announcements were made and then complain when they wouldn't allow it. or blame the airline for not accounting for all of thier passengers who had gotten off the plane, though I really think there is no one aty fault but the passenger herself.

" David jones said...
I agree about 'getting to the game early', but do TSA officials take into account the additional time the elderly ann seniors might need to get through security or is it purely first come / first serve?

February 10, 2012 5:38 PM"
------------------
TSA screens whoever gets to the Checkpoint in whatever order they get there. If you know you need extra screening or time, GET THERE EARLY!!!

Many, many times I have seen airlines checking in people (even issuing boarding passes!) after a "final call" has been made. Then the passengers have to rush down to the Checkpoint and invariably miss their flight. Of course, then it's TSA's fault for not screening them quickly enough. Airlines routinely ignore thier own "cut off" times.

" Anonymous said...
Or maybe you lot could adequately staff your gropepoints. You DO realize that gender is a protected class, and that you refused to serve someone because of her gender, right, Curtis?

February 10, 2012 6:33 PM"
-------------------
See the above comments. CP was staffed. woman decided to come back through after 3 announcements were made. Even if she had made it through security, the airline probably would not have let here board anyway because they had closed the flight.
She was not refused because of her gender. She was refused because she felt she was entitled to come through after announcements were made that the flight was closed and employees had gone home. Put the blame where it belongs.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Unsurprisingly, most of you are clearly unaware of setups in smaller airports. Rock Springs, WY is a Category 4 airport that likely only does 4-6 regional flights day. The checkpoint is probably right in front of the gate area. TSA officers in these airports are usually split shift full-timers or part-timers as there are typically 2-3 hour gaps in between flights. The airline had closed the flight, so TSA closed the checkpoint, a common practice in Cat 4's.

The woman was late, and her story doesn't add up. TSA policy allows for opposite gender screening in exigent circumstances. No one needs to sign a waiver. She may not have even needed a pat-down, no Cat 4 that I know of has bodyscanners, so she would just be going through a metal detector. If she doesn't alarm, then no pat-down takes place. If she had a metal implant and did alarm, a male officer could perform a "modified standard pat-down" using a female airline employee or police officer (if available) as a witness. If the female passenger required a pat-down and refused the opposite gender screening option because no female officers were present, she may do so, and only then would she not be allowed to entire the sterile area because all alarms must be resolved.

Submitted by Anonymous on

I honestly do wish that people would read before they post.
From Bob’s blog post:

“The airline had already made final boarding announcements and notified TSA that no additional passengers would be accepted. A TSA officer made two additional public announcements asking for any remaining passengers to report to the security checkpoint for screening. After both the flight and checkpoint were closed, a female passenger requested screening.”

TSA works WITH the airlines, and when the airline tells them that they are closing boarding TSA takes them at their word. In smaller airports they take TSO’s off the checkpoint and send them home as they are no longer needed for duty, trying to save the citizens a buck or two. But of course TSA can never win with the folks who watch this blog, nothing is ever enough. Apparently reading is too much.

Submitted by Anonymous on

So you're saying at larger airports, people should show up TWO HOURS before their flights?

Amazing. The average flight duration in the US is less that the amount of time you "must" allot to the TSA to not screw up.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Why do you need a female TSO to process a female pax? I thought the proper procedures didn't require contact that could be construed as groping or sexual assault.

Sounds like someone is lying - again.

Submitted by Anonymous on
Anonymous wrote: Sounds like someone is lying - again.

My bet's on the TSA - again. They've been caught lying too many times in the past.

If the airline wasn't boarding any more passengers, why was she told that if she'd been male should could have been screened? In every published statement about this, her story has been consistent and the TSA's story has changed repeatedly.
Submitted by Anonymous on

Anonymous said...
"TSA works WITH the airlines, and when the airline tells them that they are closing boarding TSA takes them at their word. In smaller airports they take TSO’s off the checkpoint and send them home as they are no longer needed for duty, trying to save the citizens a buck or two."

And what if a problem causes a need for re-screening the passengers?

The TSA shouldn't close the checkpoint until the plane is off teh ground.

Submitted by Anonymous on

At our airport we work with the airlines closely. They set the cutoff time TSA does not, so when they tell its cutoff time we close the gates.They instructed my supervisor that once they make their final annoucements that they will not except anymore checkins.So if they want to blame someone go to the airlines!!!.

Submitted by Anonymous on

"TSA works WITH the airlines, and when the airline tells them that they are closing boarding TSA takes them at their word. In smaller airports they take TSO’s off the checkpoint and send them home as they are no longer needed for duty, trying to save the citizens a buck or two."

Normally airlines "close" flights ten minutes before the scheduled flight time. Frequently, that ten minutes is not sufficient and airlines will continue to accept passengers.

"But of course TSA can never win with the folks who watch this blog, nothing is ever enough. Apparently reading is too much."

Reading isn't too much; believing the unbelievable is too much. Most checkpoints I see are staffed with people standing around with their hand in their pockets so I'm not sympathetic to a claim to save .16 hr of TSO time.

Time for privatization.

Submitted by Anonymous on

"The woman was late,"

Please provide your evidence of this. I don't believe you.


"... and her story doesn't add up. TSA policy allows for opposite gender screening in exigent circumstances. No one needs to sign a waiver."


So you're saying the passenger is making up the story regarding a waiver? Why doesn't Bob's propoganda suggest this?

" She may not have even needed a pat-down, no Cat 4 that I know of has bodyscanners, so she would just be going through a metal detector. If she doesn't alarm, then no pat-down takes place. If she had a metal implant and did alarm, a male officer could perform a "modified standard pat-down" using a female airline employee or police officer (if available) as a witness."

No. A passenger need not accept a patdown (ie, non-Constitutional search) from an officer of the opposite sex. Sorry, it's not up to the TSA to make this determination.

"If the female passenger required a pat-down and refused the opposite gender screening option because no female officers were present, she may do so, and only then would she not be allowed to entire the sterile area because all alarms must be resolved."

Well not all alarms. But you know that, don't you?

Submitted by SSSS For Some Reason on

"...BOTTOM LINE> NO PLANES HAVE BEEN ATTACKED OR DESTROYED SINCE TSA SECURITY HAS BEEN IN PLACE!! Take your pick people...no security to get on a plane or one in a while BURPS! which are caused by people who think they are more important than anyone else flying!!!..."

Wrong again. You and the TSA are both wrong.

The argument is not, as you put it, TSA or nothing. That is called the Strawman and is the debate style for people supporting the weaker position.

The argument is actually, and should be, and always has been, TSA verses Private Security Companies.

I choose Private Security Companies. They have the greater interest in protecting aircraft and travelers. And they can make appropriate rules for the airport they are protecting.

The TSA is only going to protect itself and its existence. It is going to make rules that apply to ALL airports regardless of them being even remotely effective. Someone pointed out a category 4 airport, why would that airport need even half of the rules and regulations of the TSA?

Submitted by Anonymous on

It's interesting to me that our disconnected political leaders are outraged over a contraception mandate to religous institutions but are perfectly fine with thousands of Americans being inappropriately touched by an United States government employee at US airports. Talk about government intrusion!

The real lesson of this incident is that average law-abiding Americans should not have to be subjected to an unwanted physical encounter to board an airplane.

AMERICA, VOTE FOR CHANGE IN 2012!

Submitted by Anonymous on

"It's interesting to me that our disconnected political leaders are outraged over a contraception mandate to religous institutions but are perfectly fine with thousands of Americans being inappropriately touched by an United States government employee at US airports. Talk about government intrusion!"

Don't be discouraged - there are huge changed coming to the TSA. Most were in place before the illegal detention of Senator Paul but that added fuel to the fire.

Submitted by Lyon Cartwright on

Working in the airline industry myself I would say that a "check in" could be aquired in several ways. I could consider myself checked in for a flight once I use an automated kiosk, or even just the internet, regardless if I still have bags to check.

Secondly, almost all flights close the jetway doors at 10 mins before departure (read your tickets). This is especially the case with the first flights out of that aurport that day. Their departing early helps ensure that the rest of the other flight that plane needs to make that day will leave on time. A one minute delay for a large air carrier at a large airport cost the airlines about $16,000 in lost revenue per minute. So this turns her "35 minutes before departure time" into 25 minutes. Thats if she wasn't stretching the truth in the first place. Now add walking from the airline counter to the checkpoint and then line at security. And yes, TSA takes time with elderly and disabled, so you throw a few of those in the line and you won't be processing as quickly as you'd expect. The time is takes a seriously disabled person to go through screening process, at least 10 non physically disabled business traveler passengers could be screened. Add screening time into the mix and then the time taken walking to the gate, or gate monitors first in case they don't know which gate to go to, and you have one very unlucky passenger driving a rental car.

On top of all that, if you are in a rush (because of your own or someone elses fault) and you are engaging in a thorough and unfamiliar process (like security screening) and add the high pressure of knowing that if you don't make it to the gate in time, you aren't going anywhere and you now have yourself a grand recipe for "Oops, I fogot to take my liquids/laptop out of my bag and change/cell/keys out of my pockets. I swear it takes more time screening someone in a rush than it take 3-4 people who are calm and prepared. A rushed passenger is quick to anger which never seems to bode well with government employees (think U.S. Post Office). Also, a rushed passenger will most likely leave something very important behind at the checkpoint. Laptop, cell phone, house/car keys, I've seen it all. Just my two cents. Its easy to blame anyone else when you aren't accustomed to taking responsibility for your own actions.

I hope anyone reading this has a better understanding of air travel as 35 mins arrival before flight departure will rarely guarantee you a flight out. You make all variables on you getting to the gate (10 mins prior to scheduled departure for those who forgot) be completely dependent on other people haveing to work harder and faster than what they are paid to do, and I'm sure anyone can understand that is not a good idea.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Um, Bob? This makes no sense:

The airline had already made final boarding announcements and notified TSA that no additional passengers would be accepted. A TSA officer made two additional public announcements asking for any remaining passengers to report to the security checkpoint for screening.

If the airline had already stopped taking passengers, then what's the point of the two further announcements supposedly made by the TSA? To use a bar analogy, that's like the bartender saying they made two 'last call' announcements... several minutes *after* the bar closed.

If you're going to make stuff up to make it appear as though you went 'the extra mile' ("We even made two more announcements! Aren't we nice! And isn't the woman stupid!), then you gotta watch the contradictions, or no one will believe it.

Oh, wait- you work for the TSA. No one believes you anyway.

Submitted by Anonymous on

heres what i love, everyone complains about the tsa spending way too much money. then someone complains that they couldnt get on a flight because the tsa are was closed. therefore, keep tsa open and staffed with overtime so they can spend more money... basic blog logic. any flights that dont go out on time cause tsa to keep officers late therefore creating overtime hours at time and a half. im sure that all bloggers are aware that very few airports are open 24 hrs correct? tsa has business hours just like any other business. they set their hours based on SCHEDULED fligth times not delayed flight times. all over the country tsa areas open and close based on SCHEDULED fights. they are actually saving taxpayer dollars by closing when there arent any flights. imagine that, tsa saving money. how about we as Americans start taking responsibilty for our actions rather than blaming anyone that they can. how about we as bloggers stop being two faced and argueing both sides of the issue depending on what the topic is so that we can show our bias as anti-tsa. good grief!

Submitted by Anonymous on

So many questions…

Why is the first point of concern the pat-down? Was this passenger about to opt-out of a body scanner? Was this passenger about to have an unresolved alarm through a metal detector? Was this passenger about to receive a "random" alternative screening? If a pat-down is as rare as TSA says it is, wouldn't the presumption be that the passenger would be clearing security normally and wouldn't be needing a pat-down?

Didn't the male TSA agents on hand admit that if "she" would have been a "he", "he" would have been able to get through security? This was reported from several sources. If so, isn't the blame realistically on TSA and not the passenger or the airline?

Is this an admittance that the pat-down is sexual in nature? If there is no sexual component, why should it matter what the gender of the screener is?

What law authorizes the touching and groping of passengers? There are very strict laws against assault, battery, sexual assault, fondling, molestation, coercion, extortion, etc.; why don't they apply? Why is the TSA violating our laws, our morals, our bodies and our children's bodies through unwanted, unnecessary, and unconstitutional pat-downs?

Submitted by RB on

Seems this is the real reason that TSA wants people at the gate early:

http://www.infowars.com/tsa-forces-woman-to-use-naked-body-scanner-three...

"Female passengers say they are being targeted by TSA screeners for sexual harassment, with one Texas woman being forced to pass through a naked body scanner three times so chuckling male TSA workers in a back room could get a good look at her “cute” figure.

The incident occurred at DFW International Airport earlier this month. Wife and mother Ellen Terrell was asked by a female TSA screener “Do you play tennis?” When Terrell asked why, the screener responded, “You just have such a cute figure.”

Terrell was then told to go through the naked body scanner not once but a second time. She then heard the TSA screener talking into her microphone saying, “Come on guys, alright, alright, one more time.”

After Terrell was forced to undergo a third blast of radiation from the body scanner, the male TSA agents in the back room who were obviously enjoying the show tried to send her through yet again to see more images of her naked body.

“Guys, it is not blurry, I’m letting her go. Come on out,” the female TSA screener said, finally ending the ordeal."

.....................
Why are 33% of all items submitted to the TSA blog censored?

Is TSA aware of the United States Constitution and Bill of Rights?

Submitted by Anonymous on

BOTTOM LINE> NO PLANES HAVE BEEN ATTACKED OR DESTROYED SINCE TSA SECURITY HAS BEEN IN PLACE!!
And none were similarly attacked or destroyed in the time between 9/11 and the implementation of TSA. See, I can do it too. One does not mean the other. If I could remember the latin I'd post it, but it would most likely mean nothing to some.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Anonymous said...
"... - BOTTOM LINE> NO PLANES HAVE BEEN ATTACKED OR DESTROYED SINCE TSA SECURITY HAS BEEN IN PLACE!!... "


Sigh, the tired old correlation/causality error.

Well, try and explain this then, the TSA SPOT program has allowed 17 known terrorists to fly within the United States, including the New York City car bomber, who conducted his attack just days after passing through TSA security. So there is one, bona fida terrorist attack that TSA could have stopped, but failed to.

I would like to see the mental gymnastics required to exonerate the TSA on this one.

Submitted by Anonymous on

She was NOT late. However, let's assume that she was...

A woman would be denied passage, but a man would not??

Additionally, why is the TSA sending agents home? Why are your employees allowed to leave early? Are your employees receiving full pay for 1/2 days?

Submitted by Anonymous on

Anonymous said...
"heres what i love, everyone complains about the tsa spending way too much money. then someone complains that they couldnt get on a flight because the tsa are was closed. therefore, keep tsa open and staffed with overtime so they can spend more money... basic blog logic."

You totally miss the point. It isn't just the amount of money spent by the TSA but *how* they are spending it. Buying expensive scanner machines that don't actually work for example.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Quoted:"Um, Bob? This makes no sense:

The airline had already made final boarding announcements and notified TSA that no additional passengers would be accepted. A TSA officer made two additional public announcements asking for any remaining passengers to report to the security checkpoint for screening.

If the airline had already stopped taking passengers, then what's the point of the two further announcements supposedly made by the TSA? To use a bar analogy, that's like the bartender saying they made two 'last call' announcements... several minutes *after* the bar closed.

If you're going to make stuff up to make it appear as though you went 'the extra mile' ("We even made two more announcements! Aren't we nice! And isn't the woman stupid!), then you gotta watch the contradictions, or no one will believe it."
-----------------------
Well, since you weren't there and neither was I, I will explain what REGULARLY happens at an airport. The airline announces final boarding for a particular flight. They use the loudspeaker system which may or may not be able to be heard at the Checkpoint. Usually, as a courtesy, a STSO will then repeat the announcement at the CP for those who may be still in line or coming through the CP and taking their time. This is not an uncommon event. Many times an airline will announce that a flight is closed when they still have a passenger or two outstanding. They do this to insure that anyone who may be loafing or just clearing security can now get their butt over to the boarding gate. It's a courtesy. I suspect something like this happened here. The airline made the final announcement, the TSA repeated it to double check that everyone was through and then they started to close down the CP. At this point the woman showed up. You know what? Sorry Charlie, you snooze, you lose.

Submitted by Anonymous on

"I hope anyone reading this has a better understanding of air travel as 35 mins arrival before flight departure will rarely guarantee you a flight out."

Nonsense. I routinely show up at the checkpoint in several airports 30-40 mins before departure. With over 100 flights in the last four years, I've never missed a flight. Care to try again?

Submitted by Anonymous on

"


Recently, a passenger attempted to access the checkpoint after it had closed. The airline had already made final boarding announcements and notified TSA that no additional passengers would be accepted. A TSA officer made two additional public announcements asking for any remaining passengers to report to the security checkpoint for screening."

Why did the TSA ask for passengers to "report" to the security theater checkpoint after the flight had closed?

The sequence of events makes no sense at all. What was used to recreate this chronology?

(screenshot)

Submitted by Anonymous on

Bob: A well-run PRIVATE company would apologize about this incident and modify its approach such as in the future closing the security checkpoint after the last plane leaves the gate. They would have to in order to remain competitive in the market place. Instead, the government run, bureaucratic TSA once again blames the innocent citizen for the problem. The TSA response to this event has been completely backward to what a good company would do. Yet another reason to privatize the TSA.

PS - I certainly hope you are indeed reviewing your procedures although we have not heard about it.

Submitted by Anonymous on

"Sorry Charlie, you snooze, you lose."

Kind of how I feel about the TSA. It's had years to become a professional security force but instead has stuck with security theater, repeatedly having incidents like the insulin pump outrage or the explosive cupcake (and you know I could go on and on).

The push for reform is coming from both sides of the isle. There will be reform. Privitization will play a large part. Bringing in professionals will also play a large part.

Sorry. You snoozed, now you lose.

Submitted by Anonymous on

anon said:
"Bob: A well-run PRIVATE company would apologize about this incident and modify its approach such as in the future closing the security checkpoint after the last plane leaves the gate. They would have to in order to remain competitive in the market place. Instead, the government run, bureaucratic TSA once again blames the innocent citizen for the problem. The TSA response to this event has been completely backward to what a good company would do. Yet another reason to privatize the TSA."

actually i think not, the private company will only worry about its bottom line and try and keep costs down by not adding unwanted costs. the screening area has closing hours just like any other government business; thats to save on taxpayer dollars.

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