USA Flag

Official website of the Department of Homeland Security

Transportation Security Administration

A Look at the Dangerous, Scary, and Downright Unusual Items our Officers Found in 2012

Wednesday, January 09, 2013
Inert Mortar Round (ELP)

Top 5 Airports for Gun Finds: 1 - ATL, 2 - DFW, 3 - PHX, 4 - IAH, 5 - FLAfter screening 637,582,122 passengers in 2012 (around 1,746,800 a day), here are some of the more dangerous, scary, and downright unusual items our officers found in 2012. This post is a reflection of the outstanding work our officers are doing in the field thanks to their vigilance and attention to detail.

1,556* (*Updated 7/3/13) firearms have been discovered in carry-on bags at checkpoints across the country. That’s a little over fourfirearms per day! Of those, 1,215 (78.7%) were loaded. Firearms have been found at a total of 199 airports with Atlanta (ATL) on top of the list - 95 in 2012.

A disassembled gun and ammunition concealed in three stuffed animals.Here are a few of the more notable firearm incidents:

A gun in a hollowed out book was discovered at Honolulu (HNL).While the number of firearms discovered this year might shock you, here are some explosively dangerous items that passengers attempted to travel with this year:

Six lbs. of black powder, detonation cords, and timing fuse were discovered at Grand Junction (GJT)

A live blasting cap was discovered in a passenger’s carry-on bag at Redmond (RDM).

In addition to the live explosives items mentioned above, we also find a lot of inert items that look like the real deal. The problem with these types of items is that we don’t know if they are the real deal until we call out the bomb experts, and sometimes even they have a hard time figuring it out. Inert items can lead to closed terminals and checkpoints, which usually result in canceled or delayed flights. Here are some of the more interesting inert items we’ve found so far this year:

An inert IED with a block of simulated SEMTEX-H, and a simulated blasting cap were discovered in checked baggage at Columbus (CSG).
A strange watch resembling an IED component was discovered at Oakland (OAK).
An inert detonator was discovered in a passenger’s pocket during a pat-down search after a Charleston (CHS) passenger alarmed the body scanner.
Eeels found in bag at Miami.

And of course, there are those items that fit into the odd/interesting category. A few examples would be bear mace in a sock, a spear gun, dead venomous snakes, a chastity belt, more cane swords than you could shake a cane sword at, a shocking amount of stun guns, a gassed up chainsaw, an 8oz. bottle of vodka discovered in a passenger's pants, a knife mounted on a walker, eels, prohibited bling, a marijuana filled grenade, another speargun, samurai swords, a stun cane, and jingle bell shotgun shells.

While this doesn’t fall into any of the categories above, it deserves to be mentioned that last August, two Behavior Detection Officers (BDO) at Miami (MIA) thwarted a kidnapping. Read more about it here.

You can check out our archives of TSA Week in Review posts to see pictures and read about many other instances where dangerous, scar, and odd items are found. Our Week in Review posts are published every Friday evening.

Speargun, swords, stun cane, chainsaw, and shotgun shells.

Bear mace, pen gun, gun in book, seal bombs, inert claymore mine.

IED training kits and intert explosives, grenade launcher, black powder, propane, det cord.

Inert bazooka, inert claymore mines, inert bazooka shell.

Powder Horn with black powder, powder flask with black powder, blasck powder primers, intert warheads.

Bob Burns
TSA Blog Team

If you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer, you can contact us by clicking here.

Comments

Submitted by Anonymous on

It always amazes me how quickly Americans forgot 9-11. All the complainers out there are spoiled, cry babies, it is as simple as that. Just remember flying is a priviledge NOT a right. Take a bus or train, I for one want myself and family safe. 10 minutes of screening is well worth it. Since 9-11 air travel has NEVER been safer!!!

Submitted by Anonymous on

Anonymous Anonymous said...
Interesting how people cry civil rights violations at an airport checkpoint and nowhere else. Does one cry when a movie theater says you can't bring in your own food and drinks?

A Movie Theater is not the Government.

Does one cry when you can't bring a weapon through a courthouse?

Courthouses are for the trial of criminal suspects. Thus, there are criminals there. You can't take a gun into a jail, either.

How about if you're too big to fit in a ride at an amusement park?

An amusement park is not the Government.

What do you mean I can't drive as fast as I want?

...has nothing to do with Civil Rights.

Nope...yet civil rights are violated at an airport...which civil rights are those? Show me where those rights are located.

Well, the Rights are mentioned in the Constitution of the United States of America and the Amendments thereto. Specifically, for example, the 4th Amendment states: "The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized."

It is simply not reasonable to put people into scanners so they can be seen naked, when a simple metal detector would keep guns and knives off planes. it is not reasonable to make people take their shoes off. It is not reasonable to take water bottle (bought 50 feet away in the airport) and throw them away. Thus these are all UN-reasonable. And the 4th Amendment guarantees our right to be safe from these un-reasonable searches and seizures.

Buying a ticket is a contract.

Between me and the airline, nothing to do with the government.

Seriously people...either quit crying or quit flying. Exercise your civil rights on the train or the roads...

Firstly, a Right that you can only practice in some places, at certain times, and with permission... isn't a Right.

Second, The TSA has already started showing up at bus stations, train stations (although Amtrak sent them packing), roadside inspection stations, and their mother agency, the DHS, even have backscatter X-ray vans for scanning pedestrians.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Bob, why weren't my comments approved regarding the Anonymous commenter above who calls Americans "soft?" They were within the guidelines of this blog.

Submitted by Anonymous on

"Only government entities can violate civil rights, not private business."

Wow...what a blind statement. So when an owner of a restaurant refused to serve food to blacks...that was the government? Civil rights was being treated equally as the constitution guarenteed. I believe most races, ethnicities, age, and genger are treated equally at airports.

The issue isn't civil rights...it's not wanting to be touched and being told what you can bring onto a plane.

To play sports, one must be touched in an invasive manner by a stranger wearing a lab coat. Semantics would call that a physical. To go to college, one must get be stabbed with needles that transfer strange foreign agents. Again semantics would call that an inoculation.

CIVIL RIGHTS people!!! Who determines where the line is drawn??

Submitted by TSORon on

Anonymous said...
[[MOST of what was "found" is/was inert. Does anyone at TSA know what "inert" means?]]

Its very difficult to determine “inert” from not inert for the average layman. They look the same, in case you didn’t know that. And even if its marked “Inert”, it does not mean that it is. You think a terrorist cant figure out how to use a stencil and a spray can of paint?

Anonymous said...
[["Another option, why not offer new ideas and solutions instead of ridiculing what is going on now?"

Nonsense. We've been offering new ideas and solutions for years:]]

Yes Anon, you have. The options you have offered reduce the level of security, increase the threat to commercial aviation, or generally are either impractical or unworkable. Not all that helpful.

Give us some suggestions that might actually improve security and can be implemented and we can assess them. Going back to the security that didn’t work would be just plain stupid.

Submitted by SSSS For Some Reason on

"...Interesting how people cry civil rights violations at an airport checkpoint and nowhere else. "

Interesting how you completely fail to understand how Civil Rights work.

The 4th, 5th, and 14th Amendments in the Bill of Rights set limits on what the government can do to you regarding investigating potential crimes. The GOVERNMENT. The Government CAN NOT search you, your house, or your possessions without probable cause, the 4th Amendment forbids it.

The movie theater? That is private property owned by a private company. If you don't like the way they do business you take your business elsewhere.

The airport? If Delta airlines requires you to fly completely naked and you agree to that by purchasing a ticket you better strip before getting on that plane. Don't like naked, fly some other airlines.

The TSA? The TSA has two problems, The first... The TSA is a Government entity. The TSA is limited by the 4th Amendment by virtue of being an agent of the Government. The second... I can not 'take my business elsewhere' if I do not support the actions of the TSA. TSA is violating the Constitution and then practicing poor business practices that would be condoned as being a monopoly if they were a private sector operation.

Submitted by Doc-it on

DEAR SSSS, TSA operate upon one factor which allows its searches to be possible. it's called "Administrative Search..." all they have to do is post signs informing you of the impending search area and procedures that you will encounter if you wish to procede to the aircraft. If you do not wish to endure such searches then you CAN take your business elsewhere such as the Bus, or train(if available) Please don't complain about stuff you have complete control over. They do respect your rights and abide by the codes they are given. the ones who dont are terminated and then alienated for life... research topics such as administrative search and what it encompasses before you spout off mindless banter. :) my $0.02

Submitted by SSSS For Some Reason on

"..Give us some suggestions that might actually improve security and can be implemented and we can assess them. Going back to the security that didn’t work would be just plain stupid."

I have a simple suggestion for you that would cost about a third what the TSA costs and be several factors safer and more efficient....

1 - Walk Through Metal Detectors and carry-on baggage x-rays.

2 - Aggressive Scanning of checked bags.

3 - Reinforced cockpit doors and allow the pilots to be armed (stun-gun, bean-bag shooters, sharp pointy sticks.... guns if the Pilots have the correct paperwork)


All three of those would have prevented the September 11 atrocities.

All three of those would cost about 2 billion dollars nation wide.

All three of those would make flying genuinely Safe and not just give the illusion of safety.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Poor Bob. So many people beating him up for doing what he is paid to do, although he COULD make things better if he took some inititive.

Many very valid comments by Anonymous, and others.

In general, the TSA is not worth the expense.

I did not know that shoe bombs were "permitted items" on US inbound flights (useless check here) but it irks me to read one lady spent $15K to win a case against the TSA, amoung other travesties

Submitted by Brandon Allred on

Wanna know why you REALLY have to remove your shoes?

1) The walk through metal detectors they have at the airports aren't able to detect the foot area so well. So in other wards... you could easily get through airport security with a small knife or maybe even a small gun in your shoe.

2) About half the shoes out there have metal rods in the middle of them. So even if the metal detector always did pick up the feet area you would get TONS of more alarms and TSA would have a lot more difficult time doing there job.

I think the TSA does a great job protecting the public. Thanks TSA!

Submitted by Anonymous on

Security Theater for the Flouride Heads. Such a waste of taxpayer funds in the name of control.

Submitted by SSSS For Some Reason on

"...TSA operate upon one factor which allows its searches to be possible. it's called "Administrative Search..." "

Close, but not quite.

An administrative search is allowed if it is specific in its investigation and limited in scope. The DUI Check points are the best example, they are checking for drivers under the influence. There are two things that allow these kinds of stops....first, the cops can only check for DUI, meaning they can't also check your trunk for drugs while you are stopped. And second, they are voluntary meaning if you see the check point ahead and you turn onto another direction of traffic they cops can't stop you for avoiding the check point. They can stop you if you leave the line, but not if you turn another direction before 'entering' the check point.

The TSA does neither of those things. You can't skip the TSA and fly commercial airlines. You have a choice of Flying Commercial, or Not Flying Commercial. That is not a choice, that is coercion. And the TSA can stop you if they think you have too much money, like the lady they stopped with the stack of checks. The TSA can put you in a box and basically leave you there as long as they deem necessary and deny you your due process of law, like the lady with the breast milk. The TSA can make you remove jewelry for reasons that no one has been able to explain, like the lady that was told to remove the professionally installed t-bar in her nipple(s). The TSA can, and still does despite what they claim, frequently intimidate passengers with the question "do you want to fly today?"

The TSA Claims they are working under the Administrative Search doctrines, but it will eventually reach to the Supreme Court and I'll bet a dollar the TSA looses that battle when it does.

Submitted by Wintermute on

"research topics such as administrative search and what it encompasses before you spout off mindless banter."

I'd suggest you do the same, as what the TSA does exceeds the administrative searches they are allowed to do.

Submitted by Wintermute on

TSORon said...
"Give us some suggestions that might actually improve security and can be implemented and we can assess them."

We have. Over and over and over again. As a TSO, aren't you speaking above your pay-grade when you speak to this point?

"Going back to the security that didn’t work would be just plain stupid."

What didn't work about pre-9/11 security? Two things (well, more than two, but two were are play on 9/11, and some still haven't been corrected leaving a HUGE gap in security even now): Cockpit doors were not secure and passengers and crew were taught to cooperate with terrorists to increase their chance of survival. Both of these have changed.

Submitted by Anonymous on

I have a new hip since 2007; it is a nightmare to go through a USA security zone with it. I am wondering if it is possible to get a special card from TSA(register in your system) permitting me to check out quicker.

Submitted by Angela on

To RB:

Please, instead of complaining about how much TSA is a failure, tell us how you would do things differently.

If your not part of the solution, you are part of the problem.

have a great day!

Submitted by Mike Toreno on

Angela:

"Please, instead of complaining about how much TSA is a failure, tell us how you would do things differently."

Fire all the clerks that don't know what a NEXUS card is or that try to stop passengers from taking photographs.

Submitted by Anonymous on

"Please, instead of complaining about how much TSA is a failure, tell us how you would do things differently."

End the shoe carnival; shoes are not dangerous and no other country shares TSA's fetish.

End the scanners; they're invasive, dangerous, take too long, and don't find anything dangerous.

End the BDO charade; there's zero science to back it up.

End the ID checks that do nothing to enhance security.

The problem is not that TSA's critics have nothing to offer. The problem is that TSA is so obstinate and resistant to truth and logic that it is not willing to engage with us.

Submitted by Wintermute on

Angela said...
"To RB:

"Please, instead of complaining about how much TSA is a failure, tell us how you would do things differently.

"If your not part of the solution, you are part of the problem.

"have a great day!"

Angela,

If you would read through the blog, you would see that RB and others, myself included, have made suggestions for improvement. So, stop and consider this: was your comment part of the solution?

Submitted by Anonymous on

Anonymous said...
I have a new hip since 2007; it is a nightmare to go through a USA security zone with it. I am wondering if it is possible to get a special card from TSA(register in your system) permitting me to check out quicker.
-----------------
Nope. In fact, I had shoulder surgery that required a metal implant just a week before flying. It was extremely tender to say the least. The TSA agent took me to a patdown and "felt up" the surgery site on my shoulder which caused enormous pain. He could see the cut, the steri-tape, the sling, the obvious metal plate outline...but his excuse for touching the surgery site was "it could be a weapon you inserted into your shoulder." I kid you not. I didn't know the TSA was versed in anatomy and surgical procedures and prosthetics.

Submitted by RB on

Angela said...
To RB:


Please, instead of complaining about how much TSA is a failure, tell us how you would do things differently.

If your not part of the solution, you are part of the problem.

have a great day!

January 15, 2013 at 11:51 AM
..................
To Angela,


I did exactly that in a response to TSOron but the TSA Blog Team in violation of my Right to Free Speech did not post that response even while it fully complied with the illegal TSA posting requirements.

TSA employees need to read the United States Constituion, the one they swore an oath to defend.

If TSA employees cannot honor their Oath they should resign from government service.

Better yet they should be jailed!

Submitted by Anonymous on
Anonymous Angela said...
"To RB:
Please, instead of complaining about how much TSA is a failure, tell us how you would do things differently.
If your not part of the solution, you are part of the problem.
have a great day!"
January 15, 2013 at 11:51 AM

Angela, a quick search of the comment section of the TSA Blog will reveal RB has offered suggestions several times, as well as correcting errors asserted by anonymous and non-anonymous TSA employees.

Here are a couple of suggestions from me, so you don't accuse me of being "part of the problem."

Harden and lock cockpit doors. - Done.

Make passengers and flight crew aware they do not always have to fully comply with a hijacker. - Done.

Stop taking naked pictures of flyers.

Start using WTMD (walk-through metal detectors) only for all passengers.

Stop sexually assaulting flyers. (Psst, TSA calls it "enhanced pat-down.")

Properly search or x-ray cargo and checked baggage, while securing such items from theft by TSA and airport employees.

Train TSA screeners how to properly x-ray carry-on luggage to catch disallowed items at a higher rate than 30%, while securing such items from theft by TSA and other passengers.

Stop the stupid liquid ban.

Stop the stupid shoe removal.

Stop the stupid multi-tool (Leatherman) ban.

Train TSA screeners on customer service and insist supervisors enforce customer service policies.

Reduce the number of TSA employees working at a checkpoint. In fact, reduce the overall number of TSA employees. Train and pay the remaining employees better and hold them to a higher standard.

Get rid of the fake-police uniforms. Go with a more professional and appropriate outfit.

Stop background checks for flyers. No American should have their private lives violated to fly.

Stop the two-tier system of "trusted" and "untrusted" travelers.

How's that?
Submitted by Anonymous on

A chastity belt? Seriously? Then don't forget the vibrator that was so "unusual" that a baggage screener was forced to write an embarassing, inapproprite message to the woman whose bag it was found in (and I'm sure you know that by his own admission there were other screeners in on the very tasteless "joke").

If you want to get respect, then you need to give respect. And please don't quote the tired statistics about how it's just one bad apple. You know very well that you're under the microscope. Every TSA agent should know this and behave in an appropriate manner.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Brandon Allred said...
Wanna know why you REALLY have to remove your shoes?

1) The walk through metal detectors they have at the airports aren't able to detect the foot area so well. So in other wards... you could easily get through airport security with a small knife or maybe even a small gun in your shoe.

Simple solution: a plastic ramp. Walk up the ramp and through the metal detector, and now your shoes are up in the area where the detector works.

No 80 billion dollars needed. No gropings needed. No handing women pliers and telling them to yank out their nipple piercings. No making nursing mothers taste their own breast milk. No terrorizing 11 year old girls (Still awaiting the Official TSA "we did everything Right" posting about that incident), no nudie-scopes, no throwing away water bottles.

Just a simple plastic ramp.

Submitted by Anonymous on

I'd like to know WHY a chastity belt is any business of the TSA and why it should be published. Yes it's odd, but this is a free country and there is nothing dangerous or illegal about this very private item. It sure as hell shouldn't be published on a public blog. What other personal items are TSA photographing and passing around for the other employees to snicker about? Extremely large sizes on undergarments? Personal prosthetic and/or sexual aid devices? I can only image what goes on with the body scanners. It's time to abolish this grade-school-mentality circus and get back to normal life again.

Submitted by RB on

Angela said...
To RB:

Please, instead of complaining about how much TSA is a failure, tell us how you would do things differently.

If your not part of the solution, you are part of the problem.

have a great day!

January 15, 2013 at 11:51 AM
..............
Angela I tried to respond to your comment but again the TSA Blog Team has censored my perfectly compliant commment.

Seems a bit unfair that others can call me out but I have no ability to respond in kind. That is an example of TSA, a TSA that cares nothing but how to protect the agency regardless of the truth.

I think government employees who make civil rights violations a normal part of their day to be the problem.

I think government employees who fear opposing points of view to be the problem.

I think government employees who violate their Oath to Defend the United States Constitution to be the problem.

I think TSA is the problem.

Don't come complaining to me when we have direct evidence that TSA and its employees care nothing for sworn oaths and promises.

For proof of ongoing censorship by TSA, Blogger Bob, and the other members of the TSA Blog Team take a look at the Delete-O-Meter that shows 36% of all comments submitted to the TSA Blog are deleted without being published.

I have a suggestion for TSA, honor the Oaths taken to Defend the United States Constitution.

Screen shot taken.

Civil Rights complaint to DHS OIG pending release.

Submitted by RB on

Angela said...
To RB:


Please, instead of complaining about how much TSA is a failure, tell us how you would do things differently.

............................

Angela, I have demonstrated that shoe removal as required by TSA has little or no security benefit.

Today I forwarded the suggestion below to TSA.

This comprises two solid cost free action steps that TSA can take today.

Now where are your suggestions to improve airport security screening?

"TSA seems to be looking for ways to expand the TSA Pre Check program.

Why not include retired military in Pre Check?.

These people have a distinctive valid ID's issued by the military services and are acceptable for travel purposes by TSA.

Retired military members have demonstrated a high level of trust by being in the military service for at least 20 years.

TSA not recognizing retired military shows TSA's distrust for those service members who sacrificed to defend the United States."

Submitted by Anonymous on

A CHASTITY BELT??? What the heck?

Submitted by Anonymous on

Man oh man!

People do have a bone to pick with TSA! I went to the post office do have a package sent, they asked if there was anything dangerous or liquid inside of it. Maybe I should have said it was none of her business. But then I'd have the deliver the package personally.

I went to get a DL from VDOT, they asked for my height, weight, and address...should have said to piss off...but then I'd have to walk to work.
Oh yeah, I was asked to do a background check before work, should have said heck no...but then I'd be homeless.

But then I wouldn't have a home because I would have laughed at the bank for wanting to do a credit check....seriously people, the things we voluntarily do to get through life are pretty minute. Same with the airport. Just smile, listen, and usually I'm allowed to go on me way.

Have a nice day folks!

Submitted by Anonymous on

For everyone that wonders why we have body scanners and why we have to take off our shoes.

1. Google shoe bomber

2. Body scanner are for those that can not clear the metal detector and would prefer a body scanner instead of a pat down.

Submitted by CliffOnTheRoad on

The plastic ramp is an excellent solution! Yet, I doubt the WTMD is really weak at the base, plus 3 oz of bomb liquid in gel-shoe inserts would not be found by the WTMD (or the x-ray either; it is non-organic.)

To test the moderators, I would love to see the contents of the "rejected" postings. Someplace. Or just might the censorship be a falsehood, like a bank which has rules up the ying-yang to "protect you" when they mean "them"

As for theft, when an employee found a watch, I really really wonder if she turned it in or might blame the loss on a passenger, since she held onto it until I left the secure area. Suggestion implied herein.

Submitted by Anonymous on

A chastity belt? That probably poses as much of a danger to air travel as a bottle of water and a dirty sock.

Submitted by Anonymous on

I, too, have recently complaints with the DHS OIG over compliant comments that never saw the light of day, RB.

screen shot

Submitted by Anonymous on

With all the crap you hear about the TSA, it's nice to see that they're actually confiscating some dangerous items. I'm still upset about my toothpaste and deodorant being taken.

Submitted by Anonymous on

In summary, I may have the solution, go back to pre 9-11 screening procedures, with poorly trained, privately owned security companies. The airlines will hire the security company, at the lowest cost(bidding process), whereas not to effect their "bottom line". You all can now keep your shoes on, jackets, and of course keep all your liquids, regardless of size. Your "rights and freedoms will no longer be affected. Smile as you enter the aircraft, good luck and god speed. You got your wish!

Submitted by Susan Richart on

"2. Body scanner are for those that can not clear the metal detector and would prefer a body scanner instead of a pat down."

To the Anonymous person who wrote the above:

Obviously you do not fly often.

Submitted by Wintermute on

Anonymous, please cite your source that pre-9/11 private screeners were poorly trained, and, if so, how the TSA screeners are any better trained.

Submitted by Anonymous on

To answer your questions: A) Fly often, but fly smart, my wife and I move quickly, most of the time. I was screened both through metal detector and body scanner, without delay. If you fly often, you do not have to be a genius to figure out what is permitted and what is not. B)Read the book Blind Spot and maybe then you will understand how dangerous air travel was in the past. All I know since 9-11 flying has never been safer. I had flown many times, on business, prior to 9-11 and security was a joke! Did you? Folks, I do not mind a little inconvenience to be safe. Stop being so sanctimonious, it is a dangerous world out there.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Since RB loves to do this I will attempt the same...

To RB...

Why not include retired military in Pre Check?.

TSA not recognizing retired military shows TSA's distrust for those service members who sacrificed to defend the United States."

As a military brat I have the untmost respect for the military. But they are not exempt from the list of organizations that hire crazies. Let's look at the Fort Hood massacre and the soldier that chucked grenades into other soldiers' tents and shooting those that ran.

I don't think it's a matter of trust. Most folks are honest and decent, the problem is the freaks of society that can easily pass as most folks. Same with the military.

It's not an issue of civil rights people, no one group is being treated unfairly. It's an issue of the right to privacy...which many a constitutionalist would argue does not exist.

Submitted by Mike Toreno on

"In summary, I may have the solution, go back to pre 9-11 screening procedures, with poorly trained, privately owned security companies. The airlines will hire the security company, at the lowest cost(bidding process), whereas not to effect their "bottom line". You all can now keep your shoes on, jackets, and of course keep all your liquids, regardless of size. Your "rights and freedoms will no longer be affected. Smile as you enter the aircraft, good luck and god speed. You got your wish!"

That would be great. I don't know if the private screeners would be poorly trained or not, but they would do a better job than the horrible job the TSA clerks do now. Shoes aren't dangerous, jackets aren't dangerous, liquids aren't dangerous. The only changes that your plan would cause is that fewer weapons would get past screening than the 70% that get through now, and that fewer iPads would be stolen.

Submitted by Susan Richart on

Another Anonymous person wrote:

"It's not an issue of civil rights people, no one group is being treated unfairly."

Try telling that to those who wear insulin pumps or who are disabled or anyone who can't assume the surrender position in the machines. They get the full enhanced pat down EVERY.TIME.THEY.TRANSIT.A.CHECKPOINT.

Screen shot

Submitted by Anonymous on

Anonymous says:
"It's not an issue of civil rights people, no one group is being treated unfairly."

Yup, the TSA treats everyone the same.

Except...

Kids:
"Screening procedures for passengers 12 and under include:
Allowing children 12 and under to leave their shoes on.
Allowing multiple passes through the walk through metal detector and advanced imaging technology to clear any alarms on children."

Old folks:
"Modified screening measures allow passengers 75 and older to:
Leave on shoes and light jackets through security checkpoints.
Undergo an additional pass through Advanced Imaging Technology (AIT) to clear any anomalies detected during screening."

TSA Pre-check:
"...they will undergo expedited screening, which could include no longer removing the following items:
Shoes
3-1-1 compliant bag from carry-on
Laptop from bag
Light outerwear/jacket
Belt"

...so, as we can see, everyone is equal, some are just more equal then others.

Submitted by Wintermute on

Anonymous said...

"To answer your questions: A) Fly often, but fly smart, my wife and I move quickly, most of the time. I was screened both through metal detector and body scanner, without delay. If you fly often, you do not have to be a genius to figure out what is permitted and what is not. B)Read the book Blind Spot and maybe then you will understand how dangerous air travel was in the past. All I know since 9-11 flying has never been safer. I had flown many times, on business, prior to 9-11 and security was a joke! Did you? Folks, I do not mind a little inconvenience to be safe. Stop being so sanctimonious, it is a dangerous world out there."

Does that book cite sources? And can you site sources that the TSA actually does a better job than pre-9/11 screeners did? Or is that book your sole basis of the statement "All I know since 9-11 flying has never been safer?" And it goes beyond inconvenience and into civil rights territory, which is why many of us are so vocal. And finally, with your somment, who's the one being sanctimonious again?

Submitted by Anonymous on

Someone might want to check the "Inert bazooka rocket" again. It looks to me a lot like a rifle grenade and if it is (the tail will be a hollow tube) it isn't inert. Tahe inert rifle grenades had a round nose. The shape of the one in the picture tells me HEAT. HOLd it nose up. The striker is in the base.

Submitted by Anonymous on

TSA doesn't get enough credit where due. Great job protecting America and providing us with peace of mind!! There will always be those who choose to complain rather than appreciate.

Submitted by Anonymous on

I'm starting to think it might be a good idea to get rid of TSA, but not for reasons you might expect. Once this organization is gone, I wonder how long it will be before we have another 9/11 on our hands. Maybe the general public will then realize the efforts of TSA employees. I agree that there are a lot of immature TSA employees. I travel often, and I have seen a large majority. But like all career choices, you cannot chracterize an entire work force based on a few people. If thats how people choose to view the world, then: all pilots are drunks, and all flight attendants sleep around. Meanwhile, all office workers are lazy, and every police officer is racist. It would make more sense to judge people based on their character, rather than their job. In my experience, I have seen many passengers throw needless fits. While my security experiences are fast and for the most part pleasant. But the passengers that treat the TSA people like dirt, receive the same treatment. It's funny how many people, that don't actually contribute to society, feel like they should complain about somehting they know nothing about.

Submitted by Anonymous on

"...so, as we can see, everyone is equal, some are just more equal then others."

You would whine if the TSA didn't give common sense and considerate treatment to them.

"Shoes aren't dangerous, jackets aren't dangerous, liquids aren't dangerous."

You should read more.

Submitted by Anonymous on

The useful information, that is not in this article, would be a compilation of the finds on a similar number of screened passengers in the 1990's - before TSA, scanners, shoe bombers, 9/11, etc.

I would suggest that the pre-TSA, pre-DHS numbers are comparable or identical... that is to say, no actual new security has been added, just costs and a creepy illusion of security for voyeuristic civil servants. However, in fairness, I can't say this with certainty, but it sure would be nice if THS would come clean with these kinds of stats going back 20 or 40 years (so it can cover the acme of the plane hijacking years: the 70's).

Submitted by Anonymous on

Anonymous said...
"...so, as we can see, everyone is equal, some are just more equal then others."

You would whine if the TSA didn't give common sense and considerate treatment to them.

I "whine' because the TSA doesn't "give common sense and considerate treatment" to anyone.

Pages