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TSA Week in Review - 29 Firearms Discovered this Week (27 Loaded)

Friday, November 01, 2013
Loaded Gun (PIT)

Loaded Gun (PIT)

29 Firearms Discovered This Week - Of the 29 firearms, 27 were loaded and nine had rounds chambered. See a complete list and more photos at the bottom of this post.

Artfully Concealed Prohibited Items - It’s important to examine your bags prior to traveling to ensure no prohibited items are inside. If a prohibited item is discovered in your bag or on your body, you could be cited and quite possibly arrested by local law enforcement. Here are a few examples from this week where prohibited items were found by our officers in strange places.

  • A 3-inch credit card knife was discovered at Albuquerque (ABQ).
Stun Guns Discovered at (Left - Right) ABQ, DTW, DEN

Stun Guns Discovered at (Left - Right) ABQ, DTW, DEN

Stun Guns - Seven stun guns were discovered this week in carry-on bags around the nation. Three were discovered at Denver (DEN), and the others were found at Albuquerque (ABQ), Amarillo (AMA), Detroit (DTW), and Las Vegas (LAS).

Knife Discovered at EWR

Knife Discovered at EWR

Miscellaneous Prohibited Items - In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly, our officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, Airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons, and a lot of sharp pointy things…

Inert Ordnance and Grenades etc. - We continue to find inert hand grenades and other weaponry on a weekly basis. Please keep in mind that if an item looks like a realistic bomb, grenade, mine, etc., it is prohibited - real or not. When these items are found at a checkpoint or in checked baggage, they can cause significant delays in checkpoint screening. While they may be novelty items, you cannot bring them on a plane. Read here on why inert items cause problems.

  • A novelty grenade lighter was discovered in a carry-on bag at San Antonio (SAN).

Ammunition - When packed properly, ammunition can be transported in your checked luggage, but it is never permissible to pack ammo in your carry-on bag.

Ammunition Discovered at (Left - Right) MSY, OMA, IAH, LGA

Ammunition Discovered at (Left - Right) MSY, OMA, IAH, LGA

Firearms Discovered This Week in Carry-On Bags

  Guns Discovered at (Top to Bottom - Left to Right) LGB, PIT, ATL, IWA, TYS, SGF, MCO, MCO, SAN, OAK

Guns Discovered at (Top to Bottom - Left to Right) LGB, PIT, ATL, IWA, TYS, SGF, MCO, MCO, SAN, OAK

29 Firearms Discovered This Week - Of the 29 firearms, 27 were loaded and nine had rounds chambered.

*In order to provide a timely weekly update, I compile my data from a preliminary report. The year-end numbers will vary slightly (increase) from what I report in the weekly updates. However, any monthly, midyear, or end-of-year numbers TSA provides on this blog or elsewhere will not be estimates.

You can travel with your firearms in checked baggage, but they must first be declared to the airline. You can go here for more details on how to properly travel with your firearms. Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure.

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the throughput is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. The passenger can face a penalty as high as $7,500.00. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions, that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items.

If you haven’t seen it yet, make sure you check out our post highlighting the dangerous, scary, and downright unusual items our officers found in 2012. The 2011 list can be found here.

Follow @TSA on Twitter and Instagram!

Bob Burns
TSA Blog Team

If you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer, you can contact us by clicking here.

Comments

Submitted by Vern Edwards on

What happens to the fools who try to get through with guns and ammo? You prosecute, right? I hope.

Submitted by Vern Edwards on

What happens to the fools who try to get through with guns? You prosecute, right? I hope.

Submitted by SSSS For Some Reason on

Annnnddd..... still no terrorists.

Submitted by GSOLTSO on

Vern sez - " You prosecute, right? I hope."

Prosecution lies with the local LEOs that assume control of the situation after TSA discovers a firearm. That step is at their discretion.

West
TSA Blog Team

Submitted by FredKlein on

GSOLTSO said...

Vern sez - " You prosecute, right? I hope."

Prosecution lies with the local LEOs that assume control of the situation after TSA discovers a firearm. That step is at their discretion.

Translation: 'No.'

Submitted by Anonymous on

And as always not a blessed thing found with your invasive, dangerous, slow, and useless naked body scanners. When are you going to admit they were a mistake and stop using them, Curtis?

Submitted by Anonymous on

The frequency of handguns discovered in carry-on luggage is mind-boggling. Surely people don't think they will get away with it?

So I wonder what proportion of functional firearms discovered by TSA agents are the result of passenger carelessness, rather than a deliberate attempt to smuggle them. Perhaps reasonable estimates exist.

Before 9/11 I was traveling in Japan and "lost" a small, treasured multitool. I unsuccessfully searched my hotel room and baggage for it. It was found under the false bottom of my carry-on bag during hand search when leaving Japan, and returned to me after the flight. The lesson is that contraband can easily be innocently overlooked, doubtless more so by people packing in a rush.

Submitted by CliffOnTheRoad on

Thought comments were disabled this week (semi-understandable) till I found the buried link. Smart or sneaky MrBurns decision?

Never read complaints about document screeners, only the real bad guys, the physical and baggage employees.

Tired of reading "I kiss the ground TSA walks on", always by Anon! At least force an IP addr, please.

Prior week column; The Bad, No, Bad sign suggestion was replied that it might not pass the legal department. IT should be run past them because of the advantages to the flying public.

Sea Salt ruining clothes due to inept bagage inspector is but one example of someone getting paid but just not caring. Shame.

I suspect the important and connected people who allow the TSA to operate as they do get special treatment at the airport. People unaware of the problems cite "there are no problems", much like ignorance of someone reading their emails.

How is it elderly parents or young children in the news are never the ones of thos connected people trying to fly?

Submitted by Anonymous on

Why was this Friday's blog post another unimportant "We find bad stuff! This jusifies our existence!" instead expressing concern and sympathy for fellow TSA employees shot or hurt in LA?

The AFGE (union) guy is all over the press, saying how TSA should be able to arrest people, should have armed guards to protect TSA employees (NOT the flying public), and other ridiculous statements.

Pistole was quoted in the news, expressing sympathy.

DHS temp boss, Beers, issued a release about the shooting.

What does TSA's PR dept do? Silence all of their Twitter feeds and blog a useless post.

You have insulted your fellow employees, as well as the families and friends of the employees hurt or killed.

Screenshot

Submitted by Bubba on

Still no dangerous items that require the full body scanner to find. Why are you still using these slow, invasive expensive and ineffective machines?

Submitted by Anonymous on

Why has this blog and Twitter acct been down for over a week? The LAX shooting is something that you should actually be blogging about: current, newsworthy, emotional issue that directly affects TSA employees and flying public, etc.

It is completely unfathomable that it takes the TSA days to even say ONE thing about the shooting, via a single @TSA Tweet. Then this blog sits fallow for a week, no posts or comments approved.

Don't pretend it's because people would send you "mean comments." 1. People do that everyday. 2. Even some of your critics are saddened by shooting. 3. You severely censor, er, moderate the comments anyway.

I expect you'll post something today (Fri, Nov 8). Will it be another useless blotter or a hyperbolic HERO! post about the screeners hurt and killed in LA?

Could it be you're putting together an actually well-written, thoughtful memorial to your fellow employees? That would surprise me.

So, Bob, Lynn, West, or one of the regional minions, please surprise me. Please.

screen shot taken

Submitted by Susan Richart on

Anonymous wrote: "Will it be another useless blotter or a hyperbolic HERO! post about the screeners hurt and killed in LA?"

As you know by now, Pistole wrote this week's piece and, happily, the word "hero" was NOT used in his piece. However, that didn't stop a couple of commenters from using the term.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Submitted by Anonymous on

"Why was this Friday's blog post another unimportant "We find bad stuff! This jusifies our existence!" instead expressing concern and sympathy for fellow TSA employees shot or hurt in LA?"

Perhaps it is because the shooting happened a week after the blog entry was posted.

Submitted by Anonymous on

No, Anonymous from Nov 11, this blotter post went up at 1:18pm Eastern on Nov 1, the day of the shooting. Hence, my valid question that remains still unanswered ten days later.

Submitted by Anonymous on

I still want to know why a government agency confiscated a bunch of $20 bills from a traveler a few weeks ago, as revealed in one of your blog photos. Can't you research it? Travelers need to know what to expect at your security checkpoints. If it wasn't TSA that confiscated the money, who did? And how did they find the money at a TSA checkpoint? Are employees of other agencies working the checkpoints, too? Are they using TSA screening to search passengers for items that are not weapons, explosives, and incendiaries?