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TSA Week in Review: 43 Loaded Firearms, Comb Knife, and More Discovered in Carry-on Bags This Week

Friday, January 02, 2015
Loaded firearm discovered in carry-on bag at TUS.

Loaded firearm discovered in carry-on bag at TUS.

50 Firearms Discovered This Week - Of the 50 firearms, 43 were loaded and 17 had rounds chambered.

Artfully Concealed Prohibited Items - It’s important to examine your bags prior to traveling to ensure you are not carrying any prohibited items. If a prohibited item is discovered in your bag or on your body, you could be cited and possibly arrested by law enforcement. Here are a few examples from this week where prohibited items were found by our officers in strange places.

  • A comb knife was discovered in a carry-on bag at Orlando (MCO).
  • A belt buckle knife was discovered in a carry-on bag at Sarasota (SRQ).
Comb Knife (MCO), Belt Buckle Knife (SRQ)

Comb Knife (MCO), Belt Buckle Knife (SRQ)

Miscellaneous Prohibited Items - In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly, our officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons and many other prohibited items too numerous to note.

Stun Guns - 18 stun guns were discovered in carry-on bags this week. Two were discovered at Phoenix (PHX), two more at Portland (PDX), and the remainder were found at Anchorage (ANC), Baltimore (BWI), Birmingham (BHM), Chicago O’Hare (ORD), Dallas Love (DAL), Fayetteville (FAY), Jacksonville (JAX), Nashville (BNA), New York (JFK), Orange County (SNA), Sacramento (SMF), Salt Lake City (SLC), San Francisco (SFO), and San Jose (SJC).

Ammo discovered in carry-on bag at TUL.

Ammo discovered in carry-on bag at TUL.

Ammunition - When packed properly, ammunition can be transported in your checked baggage, but it is never permissible to pack ammo in your carry-on bag.

Loaded firearms discovered in carry-on bags at (Clockwise from top left) FLL, ATL, HOU, DTW & SAT

Loaded firearms discovered in carry-on bags at (Clockwise from top left) FLL, ATL, HOU, DTW & SAT

Firearms Discovered in Carry-On Bags chart

*In order to provide a timely weekly update, this data is compiled from a preliminary report. The year-end numbers will vary slightly from what is reported in the weekly updates. However, any monthly, midyear or end-of-year numbers TSA provides on this blog or elsewhere will be actual numbers and not estimates.

You can travel with your firearms in checked baggage, but they must first be declared to the airline. You can go here for more details on how to properly travel with your firearms. Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure.

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. The passenger can face a penalty as high as $7,500. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions, that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items.

If you haven’t seen it yet, make sure you check out our TSA Blog Year in Review for 2013. You can also check out 2011 & 2012 as well.

Follow @TSA on Twitter and Instagram!

Bob Burns
TSA Blog Team

If you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer, you can contact us by clicking here.

Comments

Submitted by Anonymous on

One must admit that people who carry firearms while they travel must have just a bit of paranoia.

Submitted by Thomas Joy on

I have been carrying concealed for over 40 years and I always know where my weapon and ammunition is at all times. I just don't buy the stories of " I FORGOT I HAD IT WITH ME " excuse.

I hope these people do not have children in their homes when they try and use this "I FORGOT I HAD IT " excuse when one of their children finds the weapon in a jacket or purse and a child is killed due to your mental lapse.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Having armed pilots is as bad as having armed passengers. Lets also disarm the pilots so we can all be a lot safer.

Submitted by SSSS For Some Reason on

Happy New Year blog team. And tell Santa thank you for the camera be cause this us the first post in a while without recycled photos.

How many passengers did you screen this week? I'm betting that that your 50 guns found is actually a decrease in finds when put in context.

And nothing from the nudie-scanners? Maybe next week.

Submitted by Anonymous on

As always, absolutely nothing you needed your slow, invasive, and ineffective naked body scanners to detect. Meanwhile, how many people suffered physical searches thanks to false alarms on these useless machines?

Why are Curtis Burns and West Cooper unwilling to address, let alone answer, that question?

How many weeks has it been since you last trumpeted something dangerous you found with the naked body scanners?
Submitted by RB on

And still not one word about the complete failure of TSA security that allowed for the introduction and transportation of over a hundred guns in the passenger cabin of flights from Atlanta to New York.

Even with an Eight Billion Dollar Annual Budget to fund TSA our aviation security is still no better than on 9/11/2001.

Submitted by Dexter on

Another statistically insignificant blotter post. 43 guns found, which by the TSA's own admission means they missed up to 100 guns (TSA misses 7 weapons for every 3 they find). Guns that were taken on US planes, yet none fell out of the sky, because despite whatever state or local laws were broken, none of the guns found or missed by the TSA were carried by terrorists attempting to disrupt air travel.

43 guns found. At least 1,700,000 people flew on over 110,000 flights last week. That is .0025% of all passengers and .039% of all flights. A tiny fraction of a single percent of all flights and an even tinier fraction of a single percent of all flyers.

Another blotter fail and waste of tax dollars. I'm not cowering in fear, TSA. You've been running the same dog and pony show for years and nothing has changed. People have been bringing guns onboard planes for all of aviation history. The govt occasionally finds some of them. Big deal. Trotting out a few pictures and crying, "See! We matter!" does not make what you do effective, significant, or worth $8,000,000,000 every year.

Submitted by Passenger on

I would disagree about having unarmed pilots would make air travel safer. God forbid if anything bad happens there should be someone trained and armed ready to protect the passengers. If pilots are armed they (I assume) are tested and checked.

Submitted by Anonymous on

I continue to wait for some justification for active duty military being included in pre-check, but not retired military or holders of current DoD or LE background investigations. military retirees have at least 20 years documented service to this Nation, pretty much proving their lack of risk. both DoD and LE background investigations should reveal any risk factors. active duty military do not, necessarily, have a background check or any significant length of service. neither citizenship nor a background investigation is required to enlist in the military, in fact there are likely illegal immigrants serving. if it is really about safety, then why are potentially unscreened non-citizens allowed through? sounds like it is just pandering to an admirable group to get PR, not adjusting the rules to ease screening on those who present a lower likelihood of threat.
Let me be clear: pre-911 screening should be the norm. it is all that is required, now that cockpit doors have been reinforced and locked, and flight crews and passengers know that the rules have changed and passivity=death. however, if we are going to continue this massive waste of tax dollars on security theatre, at least have _some_ of the rules make sense. now you're even allowing college kids (kaydets) to endure more reasonable screening, but those who served and sacrificed for 20+ have to take their bloody shoes and belts off!!

Submitted by Anonymous on

Anonymous said...
One must admit that people who carry firearms while they travel must have just a bit of paranoia.

January 2, 2015 at 6:57 PM
-----------------------------
one must admit no such thing. carrying a firearm anytime anywhere is a Constitutionally protected civil right, not a sign of paranoia. nothing wrong with providing for one's own self-defense when in an unfamiliar place (or a familiar one, for that matter).

Submitted by Anonymous on

And still not one word about the complete failure of TSA security that allowed for the introduction and transportation of over a hundred guns in the passenger cabin of flights from Atlanta to New York.

Even with an Eight Billion Dollar Annual Budget to fund TSA our aviation security is still no better than on 9/11/2001.

I fail to see how airline employees smuggeling things through airlines passenges is TSA's fault. But then again, Im not looking to find blame with TSA for everything.

Submitted by Anonymous on

" none of the guns found or missed by the TSA were carried by terrorists attempting to disrupt air travel."

how do you know this? Because nobody was arrested? Unless someone commits the act or tells law enforcement that they intended to commit a terror attack,how would anyone know? TSA does not look for terrorist, they look for threat items.

Submitted by Anonymous on

And I was hoping that a few of you would make a New Year's Resolution to stop posting irrelevant (that's a kind choice of word) comments on this blog. I see that I was sadly mistaken. First, taking responsibility for your self defense is not paranoia. I think the fear is not while travelling, but rather conditions at destination (Miami, St Louis, you pick the city). Thomas J. above summed it up best. Know where your firearm is. While most of these are probably not linked to terrorism, it really grinds the screening process to a halt while the TSA and law enforcement goes through the process to determine that it's not a terrorist threat. I think your opinion would be different if you were in line behind the guy/gal who "accidently" had their firearm in carryon baggage and you missed your flight because of their buffoonery. Bottom line is tell your friends to review the TSA's website on prohibited items and travelling with firearms--it could make their travel experience more pleasant, not to mention the rest of the travelling population. I'm not TSA, but I've got to witness the embarrassment and problems caused by this. Perhaps TSA can get rid of this Blog when incidents stop happening.

Submitted by RB on

I have a question for TSA.

How did a person like Melvin Carraway ever get hired by TSA much less placed into positions of trust such as a FSD, Assistant Secretary, and now Acting Secretary?

http://www.theindychannel.com/news/former-state-police-superintendent-fa...

"Former Indiana State Police Superintendent Melvin J. Carraway and former Indiana Department of Transportation Commissioner J. Bryan Nicol -- appointees of then-Gov. Frank O'Bannon -- were fined Thursday by the State Ethics Commission."

A person of questionable ethics heading up TSA, an agency of questionable ethics.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Another statistically insignificant blotter post. 43 guns found, which by the TSA's own admission means they missed up to 100 guns (TSA misses 7 weapons for every 3 they find). Guns that were taken on US planes, yet none fell out of the sky, because despite whatever state or local laws were broken, none of the guns found or missed by the TSA were carried by terrorists attempting to disrupt air travel.

Dexter, I couldn't agree with you more. There is no need for this excessive security since there has not been an attack in a while. After all, None of the firearms were carried by terrorists. If a firearm is found a statement from the passenger saying "I am not a terrorist" should suffice. I am a security official at a bank. there have not been any robberies at my bank for a while, therefore I am taking all security measures at the bank out. It is a waiste of time. I will just ask every customer if they plan on robbing a bank today and that should do it.
Dexter please keep posting we can all learn a lot from the pearls of wisdom dropping out of your mouth.

Submitted by Anonymous on

I would disagree about having unarmed pilots would make air travel safer. God forbid if anything bad happens there should be someone trained and armed ready to protect the passengers. If pilots are armed they (I assume) are tested and checked.

using the "logic" (for lack of a better word) of some of the posters on this blog, having armed pilots is completly useless and a waste of money. Not one pilot has ever had to exit the cabin and point, much less use his weapon. Therfore they must not be needed. Same I guess would be said for Air Marshals. Never used, must not be needed.
Not one cabin door has ever been broken or even an attempt to break one, therefor they must also be un-needed.
TSA has never "found" a terrorist so they are un-needed...
see just how stupid that "logic" is? Its called prevention. Detourant...just as a crash wall on a freeway overpass. Just because nobody has crashed into it does not make it un needed.

Submitted by Andre L on

to: Anonymous people who are afraid to identify yourselves but like to run off your opinion. You should do some research of your own and study the statistics provided by law enforcement agencies, the FBI and other independant sources. You will find that the information PROVIDED for you that you so much like to regurgitate, is not true or partially true at best. Gun owners and concealed carry permit holders are some of the most law obiding citizens in the united state. They follow the laws closer to the constitution than the majority of the uniformed public. . It is a shame that on occasion, the TSA takes advantage of these citizens and exploits them in an effort to legitimize their unconstitutional operation. I would put money on it that all of the guns illegally seized were not being carried in an effort to commit a terrorist act but were for personal protection. I would not put my personal protection in the hands of the government, nor should you. It is your responsibility to protect yourself from those who wish to do you harm, not the government. I do not wish to have my liberties taken away so you can feel more 'safe' under a guise of false protection.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Anonymous said....

"How many weeks has it been since you last trumpeted something dangerous you found with the naked body scanners?"

How many years have you've been sending the same comment?

Submitted by Anonymous on

RB said...

"Even with an Eight Billion Dollar Annual Budget to fund TSA our aviation security is still no better than on 9/11/2001."

I'd bet the 2,977 people killed on 9/11 would disagree with you.

Since TSA took over - zero successful terrorists attacks.

That's the only statistic that matters to the millions of us who fly and arrive safely each day.

Submitted by RB on

I submitted a comment with questions about the new Acting TSA Administrator Melvin Caraway and the comment was not posted.

Why was my comment censored? It did not challenge any of the illegal TSA posting guidelines.

Apparently TSA thinks government can restrict speech of citizens.

Submitted by Anonymous on
'I have been carrying concealed for over 40 years and I always know where my weapon and ammunition is at all times. I just don't buy the stories of " I FORGOT I HAD IT WITH ME " excuse.'

According to some of the other commentors, you are paranoid and a danger to other people. You might be a very responsible gun owner, but those commentors do not allow for that.
Submitted by SSSS For Some Reason on

Anonymous said...
Having armed pilots is as bad as having armed passengers. Lets also disarm the pilots so we can all be a lot safer.

Really? Are you worried a pilot might 'snap' and start shooting people? You do realize this is the person in control of the aircraft and taking away their firearm is going to do nothing in the way of protecting you? I mean they already have an axe. A lever bar (big metal pipe). And! They have control of the aircraft that you are on. If a pilot really were to 'snap' I think them having acess to handgun would be the least of your worries.

Submitted by Puddintane on

Where's our anonymous friend this week?

Submitted by Anonymous on

Will TSA comment on Senator Coburn's recently released study about DHS (TSA's parent agency) and the corruption in and wholesale mission failure of DHS?

Article:
http://www.examiner.com/article/coburn-report-department-of-homeland-sec...

TSA-related nuggets from the linked article:

"A TSA Transportation Security (TSA) Officer entered into a conspiracy to smuggle Brazilian nationals through an international airport."

"A TSA officer fraudulently represented that he was married to a U.S. citizen on his immigration application, allowing him to fraudulently acquire U.S. citizenship."

"A TSA Supervisor was actively assisting a criminal organization in smuggling cocaine at an international airport."

"A Federal Air Marshal, who repeatedly sexually abused three minors between 2000 and 2004, was convicted and sentenced to 20 years of incarceration."

"TSA Officer wanted to have some fun, so he called in a fake bomb threat at the Columbus Regional Airport on May 6, 2009, where he was employed."

"Transportation Security Administration manager Bryant Jermaine Livingston was running a prostitution ring out of a Crowne Plaza Hotel in Maryland."

"TSA Officer Elliot Iglesias worked at the Orlando, FL, International Airport. Over a three year period, he had stolen more than 80 laptop computers and other electronic devices, valued at $80,000, from passenger luggage. Iglesias admitted that he fenced the items in Osceola County, FL."

Submitted by Thomas Joy on

There is no excuse in this world to walk into a TSA checkpoint or any establishment and trying to convince security that "I forgot I had my weapon on me ". If you are that forgetful you should not be carrying it anywhere.

Submitted by Wintermute on

Anonymous said...
"ow do you know this? Because nobody was arrested? Unless someone commits the act or tells law enforcement that they intended to commit a terror attack,how would anyone know? TSA does not look for terrorist, they look for threat items."

Then what's up with the "papers, please" when I try to travel. If they are not looking for terrorists, then identity doesn't matter.

Submitted by Anonymous on

The Bold Blotter Intern is a specialist in "detourants" - pro-TSA rants that detour into insulting all American taxpayers and flyers that fund his precious employer, the TSA.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Anonymous said...I am a security official at a bank. there have not been any robberies at my bank for a while, therefore I am taking all security measures at the bank out. It is a waiste of time. I will just ask every customer if they plan on robbing a bank today and that should do it. "

Funny you work at a bank. How do you guys protect all that money in your vault? With armed guards. If guns are good enough to protect money why are then not good enough to protect passengers?

Anonymous do please keep posting we can all learn a lot from the pearls of wisdom dropping out of your mouth.

Submitted by Anonymous on

"How many years have you've been sending the same comment?"

How long have Curtis Burns and West Cooper been refusing to answer it?

Submitted by RB on

Anonymous

I fail to see how airline employees smuggeling things through airlines passenges is TSA's fault. But then again, Im not looking to find blame with TSA for everything.

January 5, 2015 at 9:01 AM
...........................
TSA Mission from www.tsa.gov

Protect the Nation's transportation systems to ensure freedom of movement for people and commerce.
....................................

Sure looks to me that TSA has overall responsibility for Transportation Security. That would make TSA responsible for any failure of the security system. Proof of that position can be derived from the requirement that airports submit their Security Plans to TSA for approval.

Regardless the manner in which TSA is doing security would parallel a person locking the front door of their home while removing the backdoor.

The ability to introduce contraband through employee entrances is a known security weakness that TSA has been reluctant to address.

As long as TSA leaves the backdoor standing open is there really any reason to have TSA manning the front door?

Submitted by Anonymous on

"Apparently TSA thinks government can restrict speech of citizens."

Apparently you don't realize TSA runs this blog and controls it. TSA can choose to end it at any time. I guess that would eliminate all speech huh?

Submitted by Anonymous on

"Will TSA comment on Senator Coburn's recently released study about DHS (TSA's parent agency) and the corruption in and wholesale mission failure of DHS?"

Considering the failures of Congress I don't think TSA needs to justify a response.

Submitted by Anonymous on

"How many years have you've been sending the same comment?"

Why are you so bothered by the question? Wouldn't it seem like it would be a simple thing for TSA to respond to it?

Submitted by Anonymous on

"As long as TSA leaves the backdoor standing open is there really any reason to have TSA manning the front door?"

The "backdoor" is not TSA controlled space; that would be the responsibility of airport security/Law Enforcement and thus their failure (in said case). TSA approval of security plans are designed to evaluate potential impact on agency responsibility not the security of all airport operations.

Submitted by Anonymous on

....'Wouldn't it seem like it would be a simple thing for TSA to respond to it?"

What answer would satisfy you?

Submitted by RB on

Anonymous said...
"Apparently TSA thinks government can restrict speech of citizens."

Apparently you don't realize TSA runs this blog and controls it. TSA can choose to end it at any time. I guess that would eliminate all speech huh?

January 7, 2015 at 11:25 AM
..................
Actually it seems that you are the one to not understand.

TSA being part of federal government is required to conduct itself withing the laws of this country.

TSA uses TAX Payers monies to fund this blog and its operations. It is not a privately operated blog that is not bound by Free Speech.

The supreme law of the land is the United States Constitution as Amended.

It disturbs me that people like you are so willing to look the other way when government violates our laws.

Freedom, including Freedom of Speech, is the law of the land.

Those TSA employees who refuse to obey our laws should be removed from government service, with prejudiced, and then charge and tried for violations of that law.

The only thing you said that is correct is that TSA can take this blog down and there would be no freedom of speech violation.



Submitted by Anonymous on

@ the TSAnonymous who thinks a federal govt dept doesn't have to answer to Congress:

ARE YOU KIDDING?! Dear me, I hope you really aren't that ignorant and you're just being reactionary.

Submitted by Anonymous on
Detourant...just as a crash wall on a freeway overpass.

Is this an example of your logic? Obviously, you have not expended much thought on the purpose of 'crash walls' (not actually the technical term) if you think they are deterrents. They are intended to control the severity of a crash, not prevent crashes in the first place. Do you think 99.9% of drivers somehow cannot manage to stay in their lane when there is no 'crash wall' present?

"I'd bet the 2,977 people killed on 9/11 would disagree with you. Since TSA took over - zero successful terrorists attacks. That's the only statistic that matters to the millions of us who fly and arrive safely each day."

Since my home airport got a Sbarro franchise, there have been zero terrorist attacks related to air travel. Since Sbarro employees don't stick their hands in my pants and I don't pay their salaries with my tax dollars, Sbarro >>> TSA in counterterrorism matters.

Seriously: Read up on that 'correlation does not imply causation' thing.

Also: Claiming that you speak for the 9/11 victims is a crass exploitation of their deaths.

Finally, try on these statistics:

http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2013/04/statistics-you-are-not-going-to-b...

"Considering the failures of Congress I don't think TSA needs to justify a response."

Huh? Can you offer some specific examples of how 'failures of Congress' means that TSA is not required to be accountable to the US citizenry?
Submitted by Anonymous on

@RB-

TSA is charged with screening passengers entering the terminal. The airports themselves are charged with perimeter/grounds security. The security lapse with the firearms smuggling is on the airport itself and its contract security company for allowing them through the vehicle gates. Think twice before you want privatized security.

Submitted by Anonymous on

West, did you approve the comment by the anonymous TSA employee (during regular work hours) who said the duly elected representatives of the American public should not have oversight and ultimate control over the TSA?

Who is this TSA employee and why did you approve such a comment on a federal government website?

Submitted by GSOLTSO on

Anon sez - "West, did you approve the comment by the anonymous TSA employee (during regular work hours) who said the duly elected representatives of the American public should not have oversight and ultimate control over the TSA?

Who is this TSA employee and why did you approve such a comment on a federal government website?"

A couple of points -

1. I have no idea which commenters using anonymous work for TSA - and contrary to many comments here, neither do you.

2. Which comment specifically are you speaking of?

3. TSOs work a variety of schedules and hours, so IF the individual WERE a TSO, you (nor I, nor any of the other folks that comment here) know what their work schedule and hours are.

So, to recap - which question, none of us know who the anon is and whether they are a TSO/TSA employee or not, and none of us know if the comment was actually posted during the commenters work hours - except the one that posted the comment.

West
TSA Blog Team

Submitted by John Barker on

"Anonymous Said
Another statistically insignificant blotter post. 43 guns found, which by the TSA's own admission means they missed up to 100 guns (TSA misses 7 weapons for every 3 they find). Guns that were taken on US planes, yet none fell out of the sky, because despite whatever state or local laws were broken, none of the guns found or missed by the TSA were carried by terrorists attempting to disrupt air travel.

Dexter, I couldn't agree with you more. There is no need for this excessive security since there has not been an attack in a while. After all, None of the firearms were carried by terrorists. If a firearm is found a statement from the passenger saying "I am not a terrorist" should suffice. I am a security official at a bank. there have not been any robberies at my bank for a while, therefore I am taking all security measures at the bank out. It is a waiste of time. I will just ask every customer if they plan on robbing a bank today and that should do it.
Dexter please keep posting we can all learn a lot from the pearls of wisdom dropping out of your mouth."

It’s nice to know that when the facts are distorted no one cares to do some research. I did read that 70% of threats get through security but what Dexter forgot to mention is the statistic mentioned is internal testing. I highly doubt the TSA gets tested over a thousand times in a single day. Therefore, those numbers by Dexter are extremely skewed to make TSA look bad. Please research before praising someone and spreading more false information.
To those saying the "nudie scanners" don't work I am happy to say I have witnessed on one occasion when it did what it's supposed to. Good thing I was already on the other side of security. A man "forgot" he had a gun strapped to his ankle. How funny, because I am proud to carry mine concealed legally and I can certainly feel the weight, and know better that it is not allowed through security.
Thank you TSA for all the hard work.

Submitted by Anonymous on
"The "backdoor" is not TSA controlled space; that would be the responsibility of airport security/Law Enforcement and thus their failure (in said case). TSA approval of security plans are designed to evaluate potential impact on agency responsibility not the security of all airport operations."

If TSA is responsible for the secure area and one way to get into the secure area is to use employee/vendor access routes, why in the world wouldn't TSA have an interest in securing employee/vendor access routes? You seem to be perfectly okay with it if TSA is effectively ignoring this kind of access, which is shocking considering the recent revelation of the Delta gun smuggling ring. (See http://www.cnn.com/2014/12/23/us/delta-employee-gun-smuggling/index.html.) Is it too much to expect a government agency to be reasonably competent in its primary mission?

TSA regularly operates outside the secure area anyway. Look up the VIPR program, which deploys TSA employees to sporting events and such. Here's a link: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/08/06/us/tsa-expands-duties-beyond-airport-s....

For another example of TSA giving its blessing to security operations outside the secure area, here are a media link and a TSA blog post in which TSA acknowledged approving such operations:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2368739/Valet-park-car-airport-I...
http://blog.tsa.gov/2013/07/false-report-tsa-airport-car-searches.html
Submitted by RB on

 Anonymous said...@RB-TSA is charged with screening passengers entering the terminal. The airports themselves are charged with perimeter/grounds security. The security lapse with the firearms smuggling is on the airport itself and its contract security company for allowing them through the vehicle gates. Think twice before you want privatized security.January 9, 2015 at 6:39 PM
.............................................
TSA is charged with overall responsibility for the security of all transportation systems. Everything security related in the sterile area is TSA's responsibility.

Submitted by RB on

So, to recap - which question, none of us know who the anon is and whether they are a TSO/TSA employee or not, and none of us know if the comment was actually posted during the commenters work hours - except the one that posted the comment.
WestTSA Blog Team
January 10, 2015 at 10:49 AM
*************************
You can see if they are posting from a DHS or other government agency computer, correct??

Submitted by Susan Richart on

An anonymous person wrote:

"TSA is charged with screening passengers entering the terminal. The airports themselves are charged with perimeter/grounds security. The security lapse with the firearms smuggling is on the airport itself and its contract security company for allowing them through the vehicle gates.

WRONG!

1. TSA is charged with screening passengers entering the allegedly "sterile" area of an airport, not the terminal.

2. TSA secures our Nation's commercial airports through a variety of programs. The programs most familiar to the traveling public include passenger screening operations conducted by Transportation Security Officers (TSO) at security checkpoints; cargo screening; and the Secure Flight program, which fulfills a key 9/11 Commission recommendation to implement a uniform watch list matching program for all passengers traveling from, within, or bound for the U.S. against names on government terrorist watch lists.

While these are the most visible or recognized layers of security at our Nation’s airports, there are other layers, less obvious to the traveling public, that play an equally important role in safeguarding our Nation against terrorist threats. These additional layers include focusing on preventing and detecting the unauthorized entry, presence and movement of individuals and ground vehicles into, and within, the secured and AOAs of an airport.

All airport security programs must be approved by the TSA.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Submitted by Anonymous on

West wrote:

"...and none of us know if the comment was actually posted during the commenters work hours."

A check of the ISP would tell you whether or not the writer was using a DHS computer, which is against the rules.

Submitted by Anonymous on

West, if you are unable to recognize when aTSA employee (using a TSA or .gov IP address) posts to this website, you should not be approving comments.

You keep acting like it is impossible to know who the TSA employees are, when it is possible to pick out most of them, even the ones who violate govt rules for employee postings. Why isn't the TSA enforcing the guidelines for employee comments? Why aren't you?

Pretending like you are so innocent and unable to figure out who is commenting on this blog is either proof of the blotter team's incompetence or your lying. Which is it, West?

Submitted by Anonymous on

"Who is this TSA employee and why did you approve such a comment on a federal government website?"

So man assumptions,so little knowledge. Sad.

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