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Transportation Security Administration

TSA Week in Review: May 27th - June 2nd - 59 Firearms, Machete, Lipstick Knife and More

Friday, June 03, 2016
Discovered 59 firearms image

Fifty-nine firearms were discovered this week in carry-on bags around the nation. Of the 59 firearms discovered, 51 were loaded and 20 had a round chambered. All of the firearms pictured were discovered last week. See a complete list below.

If an item looks like a real bomb, grenade, mine, etc., it is prohibited. When these items are found at a checkpoint or in checked baggage, they can cause significant delays because the explosives detection professionals must respond to resolve the alarm. Even if they are novelty items, you are prohibited from bringing them on board the aircraft. Inert/Replica grenades were discovered this week in carry-on bags at Newark (EWR), Gulfport (GPT), Seattle (SEA) and Albany (ALB). An inert grenade was also discovered in a checked bag at Salt Lake City (SLC).

Discovered four grenades

From left to right, these grenades were discovered at: ALB, EWR, GPT and SLC.

Discovered two inert rounds

Two inert rounds were discovered in checked bags this week. A 30mm A-10 Warthog shell was discovered at Birmingham (BHM). A 25mm round was discovered at Sonoma (STS).

Discovered a lipstick knife

A lipstick knife was discovered in a carry-on bag at Albuquerque (ALB).

Discovered an 11-inch machete

An 11-inch machete was discovered in a carry-on bag at Billings (BIL).

Table for discovered firearms in carry-on bags listIn addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly in carry-on bags, our officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons, stun guns, small pocketknives and many other prohibited items too numerous to note.

When packed properly, ammunition can be transported in your checked baggage, but it is never permissible to pack ammo in your carry-on bag.

You can travel with your firearms in checked baggage, but they must first be declared to the airline.

You can go here for more details on how to properly travel with your firearms.

Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure.

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. The passenger can face a penalty as high as $11,000. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions; that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items.

*In order to provide a timely weekly update, this data is compiled from a preliminary report. The year-end numbers will vary slightly from what is reported in the weekly updates. However, any monthly, midyear or end-of-year numbers TSA provides on this blog or elsewhere will be actual numbers and not estimates.

Read our 2015 Year in Review post! If you haven’t read them yet, make sure you check out our year in review posts for 2011, 2012, 2013, and 2014.

Follow @TSA on Twitter and Instagram!

Bob Burns
TSA Social Media Team

Comments

Submitted by James Elsea on

To all TSA members. Thank you for a job well done, Jim Elsea.

Submitted by Anonymous on

As always, absolutely nothing you needed your slow, invasive, and ineffective naked body scanners to detect. Meanwhile, how many people suffered physical searches thanks to false alarms on these useless machines?

Why are Curtis Burns and West Cooper unwilling to address, let alone answer, that question?

How many weeks has it been since you last trumpeted something dangerous you found with the naked body scanners?

Submitted by Anonymous on

Why isn't "precheck" the default level of screening for ALL passengers, and not just the wealthy, elite, and lucky?

Wouldn't the lines TSA caused be shorter if you didn't waste everyone's time with a scientifically indefensible liquid ban, a pointless shoe carnival, and your slow, invasive, and ineffective naked body scanners?

Submitted by Anonymous on

Last time I flew, the lines were so long that the screeners shut down the scanners and told people to leave their shoes on and walk through the metal detectors. Lines went away. Why don't you just do this on a permanent basis?

Submitted by Fix The TSA on

Bob, you are falsely claiming the four toy or replica grenades are actual grenades in your caption,

"From left to right, these grenades were discovered at: ALB, EWR, GPT and SLC."

Were any of them actual, but inert, grenades? What are the dimensions for each of these four replicas? Previously, you have enlarged or zoomed in on replica or grenade-shaped cologne bottles to make them appear larger than they actually were.

The shiny gold "grenade" is what, a cigarette lighter?

TSA says if a "grenade" is real, but inert, or is a lifesize, believable replica, it is prohibited.

Without accurate information on the size of the objects and what these objects really are, we must assume it is possible that none of them meet TSA criteria for confiscation by gov't employees, especially the shiny gold one.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Good Job TSA , Wish You Good Luck

Submitted by Tees50 on

Why don't people just follow the rules and leave all these items at home... Seems like a job well done.. I would prefer they start not letting anyone that violates carry on rules to this degree never be allowed to fly again.. That will shorten the lines.. TSA obviously isn't perfect but overall I think they do a good job..

Submitted by Carlacarlacarlacarla on

Anonymous evidently doesn't tire of pasting the same tiresome response on TSA blog week-after-week-after-week...

Submitted by Carlacarlacarlacarla on

*ThumbsUp*

Submitted by SSSS For Some Reason on

"..Two inert rounds were discovered in checked bags this week."

They were determined to be inert so were they allowed to fly? If not, why not?

Submitted by Falcon-One on

What is TSA’s job? To put it simply, I’ll look to their Mission Statement. It says, “With honor and integrity, we will safeguard the American people, our homeland, and our values.” The job they have been put forth to do is keep the flying public safe. I have seen many of you say, “well TSA has never caught a terrorist.” TSA’s mission never was or has been to catch terrorists. So I will leave you with this, There has NEVER been a terrorist attack on our aviation system here in the United States since 9/11! So TSA is doing a fantastic job and I’m proud of them and their service.

Submitted by Lusitano on

Keep it up TSA! Way to go! For all the whiners out there; tired of waiting in line and of armless searches? Take a bus... or walk...

Submitted by Richard Tunner on

Keep up the good work TSA

Submitted by Anonymous on

If you actually knew what you were talking about I might give you credit but you're a little behind in the times. The "naked" body scanners do not show naked images anymore. They havnt for some time now. The body scanners take 30 seconds or less if nothing is detected and can pick up on liquids which regular detectors can't. I'm sure you're also one to complain when your McDonald's older takes more than 30 seconds as well.

Submitted by Lawrence Liverm... on

Bob,

I thought you might want to know that the "inert A-10 Warthog shell" is actually depleted uranium and is radioactive. Don't worry. It's less radioactive than your backscatter cancer boxes, so any clerks who worked checkpoints got more exposure. But, you probably shouldn't keep the shell on your desk as a souvenir. Unless another TSA employee wants to go to jail, I'd advise against violating HAZMAT laws by just throwing it out.

Submitted by Fix The TSA on

@tees50 The right to travel in the US is settled. You better not wish others are denied their rights, because the next person who will be denied is you.

Submitted by Fix The TSA on

@carla Tell your TSA co-workers to answer commenter questions, then they will stop being asked.

Submitted by Fix The TSA on

No, Falcon-One (a TSA screener), your bosses admitted in court that terrorist groups aren't targeting the airline industry. THAT is why planes aren't falling from the sky, not TSA's failed procedures.

Submitted by Fix The TSA on

@Lusitano, the right to travel is settled. How does one take a bus to Hawaii? Europe? Juneau, AK?

Submitted by Doober on

Oh, my it does seem as if there is a big push on both here and @AskTSA for positive PR. How many of the above PPs (positive posts) are from TSA employees? 6 out of 7?

Submitted by Anonymous on

"Anonymous evidently doesn't tire of pasting the same tiresome response on TSA blog week-after-week-after-week.."

Perhaps if TSA answered any of the valid questions about their technology's high false positive rate, the questions would stop being asked.

Submitted by SSSS For Some Reason on

Falcon-One said..."There has NEVER been a terrorist attack on our aviation system here in the United States since 9/11!"

And there has NEVER been a terrorist attack on our aviation system here in the United States since 9/11 since I switched toothpaste. Now give me my fair share of the Eight Billion dollar TSA Budget for keeping the airways safe from WEI.

Submitted by Wintermute on

If you knew what you were talking about, you would know the scanners generate the same images but just don't store them. You would also know that there is no viable liquid explosives. Finally, you would know that 30 is much greater than 5.

Submitted by RB on

Anonymous said...
If you actually knew what you were talking about I might give you credit but you're a little behind in the times. The "naked" body scanners do not show naked images anymore. They havnt for some time now. The body scanners take 30 seconds or less if nothing is detected and can pick up on liquids which regular detectors can't. I'm sure you're also one to complain when your McDonald's older takes more than 30 seconds as well.

June 7, 2016 at 12:38 AM
........................................
The core MMW Whole Body Imagers still have all the capabilities of the original MMW Imagers but have had ATR added. They still have image storage capability, data transmission ability and other capabilities.

Now I do agree that they take about 30 seconds per scan. That includes loading, scan and unloading. If a targeted pat down is required I think the time exceeds 30 seconds. If a more thorough pat down is needed we all know that can run anywhere from a couple of minutes to TSA's "To Afraid To Let the Public View Pat Down" that takes a good deal of time.

But let us keep the 30 seconds per traveler in mind for right now. 30 seconds for one person or about 120 people per hour. Pretty dismal numbers for a piece of equipment that costs about $250,000 tax dollars. Just one Boeing 737-800 can seat around 170 passengers so clearing enough people for just one flight on that type aircraft takes TSA about one and one half hours. If you start looking at higher capacity aircraft or the number of flights out of the larger airports per day you can see why TSA has a capacity problem no matter how many security checkpoints are put in place.

The Whole Body Imager is not a workable solution to the screening issue. TSA readily admits that 99.9% of travelers present no threat and require little attention. When purchasing an airline ticket each name is checked through numerous databases, some public, some private, some special access, and TSA knows right then and there if the person presents a threat.

That information is what screening should be based upon, not TSA's current "everyone is a terrorist" screening model that is being used now. What TSA is doing is not "Risk Based" screening nor is it necessary.

TSA as a security screening agency is a failure as demonstrated over the last few months.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Only the live rounds are depleted uranium. The training rounds (which the dummy looks to be one) are not. Don't think Uncle Sam is in the practice of giving away expensive rounds as souvenirs. I know this because I have one sitting on my desk.

Submitted by Anonymous on

@Lusitano, the right to travel is settled. How does one take a bus to Hawaii? Europe? Juneau, AK?

walk, drive, swim, ship, private jet, private plane...Glad I could help

Submitted by Fix The TSA on

Bold TSApologist,

Sigh.

You follow up your July 20, 2016 at 11:00am comment with an even more substandard response.

Why are you so scared of questions to fellow commenters? Why are you so scared of logic?

You claim you get on airplanes to travel. Why do you choose to fly, rather than "walk, drive, swim, ship, private jet, private plane*?"

What convenience or savings do you get from air travel?

(*Haha, you do know a jet is as plane, right?)

*screenshot*

Submitted by Anonymous on

Fix the TSA said...
Bold TSApologist,

Sigh.

You follow up your July 20, 2016 at 11:00am comment with an even more substandard response.

Why are you so scared of questions to fellow commenters? Why are you so scared of logic? I love questions, bring them on.

You claim you get on airplanes to travel. Why do you choose to fly, rather than "walk, drive, swim, ship, private jet, private plane*?" because it is faster, in many cases safer, I like commercial travel and cant afford private travel.

What convenience or savings do you get from air travel? I think I covered that above.

(*Haha, you do know a jet is as plane, right?) No kidding? I'm pretty sure you know what I meant.

Submitted by Wintermute on

And those reasons are the same as most people. So, thanks for proving how illogical your own argument is. Which was the point of those questions to begin with.

Submitted by Fix The TSA on

Hey Wintermute, did you see how Boldy didn't answer my first two questions? She "pulled a West."

Submitted by Wintermute on

Surprised, how? I'm starting to think that evading questions is part of TSA's training.

I used to have some level of respect for West - as much as one could have for a TSAgent, anyhow. Not any more. He started mastering the art of word play, and the respect that I did have for him went away.

I've NEVER had any respect for Boldy for the same reason. Every answer is a non-answer - a play on words so that it's technically correct but either doesn't answer anything or says the opposite of the truth.

Submitted by Fix The TSA on

West, the more American citizens' comments that you delay and delete, the more proof and evidence we have of blog policy and Constitutional violations by the TSA, you, Bob, and "HQ elements."

*screenshot* and reported