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#TSATravelSafe - Improving Your Checkpoint Experience & Keeping You Safe

Friday, June 03, 2016
travel safe

TSA travel safe flyerIt’s officially the summer travel season. This year, there is an increased number of travelers and a need for enhanced security.

This infographic shows the steps we’re taking to improve your experience at the checkpoint, while still ensuring your safety. Take a look, then share it on your social media networks with your fellow travelers.

Right click on this image and save, or use the following the link to share this image: http://bit.ly/25EQPcL

To find out more about how TSA is working to secure our nation’s transportation systems, check out #TSATravelSafe on social media.

TSA Blog Team

Comments

Submitted by Anonymous on

Really? You're taking "every step"?

You've ended the shoe carnival and the liquids farce?

You've shut down the slow, invasive, and ineffective naked body scanners and gone back to WTMDs?

Until you do, you're endangering the traveling public and continuing to create the long lines that airports that you, and you alone, are responsible for.

Submitted by Susan Richart on

Just how do the dogs screen passengers, Bob or West? If it's just a sniff test, it's useless unless those passengers who pass the test get to keep their shoes on.

I notice that AskTSA has stopped claiming that dogs speed the screening process; that's a positive step.

As for those 768 new screeners - from that number you have to subtract the number who leave each month, allegedly 468 if it's 117 a week, so TSA is left with a net gain of 300 new screeners a month.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Submitted by Mark on

I was Dallas Love Field on Tuesday. I was shooed like an animal into a new line by an agent making a waving motion with his arm and hand (move along, little doggie). The air travelers were an annoyance to that agent, at least. I don't believe that we are people to him.

Submitted by Adrian on

Every step? Like getting rid of the useless identity checks?

After all, if a domestic terrorist, who had recently served a seven-year prison sentence can not only fly but qualify for TSA PreCheck, what good are the identity checks really serving? http://cnsnews.com/news/article/ali-meyer/tsa-cleared-former-domestic-te...

Or if a suspected war criminal can pass the FBI- and TSA-administered background checks that qualifid him for a job as an airport security guard at Washington Dulles, how useful can PreCheck and the no-fly list possibly be? http://www.cnn.com/2016/06/01/us/accused-war-criminal-works-at-dulles-ai...

It's (long past) time to stop putting passengers at risk of identity fraud by making them submit their PII to the airlines. It does nothing but place millions of innocent Americans at risk.

Submitted by Loretta on

I do not feel U.S. senior citizens over the age of 75 should have to pay a fee to apply for TSA pre-check. Most are on fixed incomes and their frequency of travel does not warrant paying this fee. Yet we are the very ones that need to be expedited through those lines. Airports and travel are stressful enough. SENIORS SHOULD BE GIVEN A BREAK.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Why don't you make precheck the default level of screening for all passengers and not just the wealthy, elite, or lucky few?

Wouldn't that end the massive line problems TSA created?

Submitted by Anonymous on

Why do you charge $85 for a background check that costs $12?

Submitted by Fix The TSA on

Hey West, when you get back from vacation, it looks like you got your hands full answering questions over the past several blog posts. Will you be answering these questions or providing links to TSA official comments which may answer these questions?


Submitted by Fix The TSA on

How often has your infographic been shared so far, Bob? West? Lynn? HQ Elements?

Why would anyone not on the TSA social media spam accounts share your infographic?

How does it benefit a non-TSA employee to display your infographic on his website?

Who created your infographic?

This appears to be another pivot by TSA public relations, trying to keep Congress and the American public from being so mad at TSA.

How is this latest attempt to sway the public working? Better than the previous attempts?

Submitted by KodiakDon on

Not bad enough I have to tolerate being groped I now have to worry about dogs?

Oh please.

Submitted by RB on

What evidence is available showing a need for "ENHANCED SCREENING"?

Does that "ENHANCED SCREENING" involve "Enhanced Groin Searches" that you TSA Bloggers seem so afraid of becoming knowledge?

How many TSA Screeners quit each week?

Submitted by Anonymous on

You should profile & check like Israel does. It feels much safer with them then any US or western air port or airlines

Submitted by Jud Hanson on

How about posting signage at check-in locations, curbside and throughout airport parking that weapons, real or novelty, are not permitted in carry-on luggage and stating the penalties for trying to bring such items onto the plane? Based on the weekly TSA Blog listing confiscated items, there is an epidemic of ignorance among travelers. Not having to deal with people who can't remember they have a loaded 9MM in their purse would cut security line times by 50%+.

Submitted by Wintermute on

And just think, with the published failure rates, of how many flew without incident. I'm not saying to allow guns on, but AIT is obviously not working. Maybe if TSA stopped focusing on "anomalies" that are harmless, they could focus on WEI instead. But then they wouldn't be able to count a 3.5 oz tube of toothpaste as a "good find." :/

Submitted by SSSS For Some Reason on

Jud Hanson said..."Based on the weekly TSA Blog listing confiscated items, there is an epidemic of ignorance among travelers"

Not so much.

Roughly two million passengers went through TSA security choke points last week. That gives you several zeros after the decimal place of items found this week. A fraction of a fraction of a fraction of one percent doesn't really qualify as an 'epidemic' to anyone other than the TSA Cheerleaders.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Anonymous said...
Why do you charge $85 for a background check that costs $12?

June 3, 2016 at 5:10 PM
------------------------------------
I have a better question - why do you charge $85 for a background check on people who've already been investigated by the federal government?? why aren't those with active, valid background investigations (like IC, LE, or DoD BIs) not treated as low risk & automatically afforded Pre-check?? why are folks without any background check (like new military enlistees, academy cadets, and high mileage frequent flyers) given pre-check??

Submitted by Sheila Proctor on

Do you get pleasure out of long lines? Does it help your job? I am in a looong line at SFO at 7:30, one of the busiest times. Not all scanners are open. Duh

Submitted by Anonymous on

Roughly two million passengers went through TSA security choke points last week. That gives you several zeros after the decimal place of items found this week. A fraction of a fraction of a fraction of one percent doesn't really qualify as an 'epidemic' to anyone other than the TSA Cheerleaders.

On 9-11, roughly the same number of people traveled. 8 had ill intentions. That is a fraction of a fraction of a fraction...yet over 3000 people died. That's about 375 for each of the 8. Call it what you wish, epidemic, anomaly, coincidence...what ever, if TSA stops one person with ill intent out of 80 million, 90 million passengers and saves 375 lives, it was probably worth it.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Do you get pleasure out of long lines? Does it help your job? I am in a looong line at SFO at 7:30, one of the busiest times. Not all scanners are open. Duh

SFO is NOT TSA. People are demanding privatization, I guess you debunked that as a save all. Why aren't lanes open? Staffing. Its that simple. TSA is down about 25% and congress doesn't want to allow them more officers.
TSA focused on speed and customer service not long ago. Look what happened. They failed a bunch of irrelevant tests. The public was irate. So TSA went back to basics and began doing more in-depth screening and now there is a wait time. The public cant have it both ways.
Most of these officers are making less than they would if they were on welfare. they haven't had a COLA raise since Obama took office. Its no wonder they are leaving in droves. Pay them in accordance with other federal officers and it will attract a better quality officer.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Check this out, my wife and I flew from ATL to DTW on Southwest Saturday June 18th with 4 checked bags. When we arrived we waited on our bags only 3 showed up. The Southwest luggage guy asked if we had gotten all of our luggage. I told him no still waiting on 1. He said if it doesn't show up we can file a lost luggage claim. Well it didn't show. He said TSA must have held it in ATL. Now it's 3 day's later and no bag. My wife and I were started a new job driving a truck. All of our new shirts, pants, socks, and new laptop we had just bought was in that bag we needed for orientation. Funny Southwest blames TSA. I guess TSA will blame Southwest. All I want is my bag back. No questions to answer. Any help or advice??

Submitted by GSOLTSO on

Anon sez - " Funny Southwest blames TSA. I guess TSA will blame Southwest. All I want is my bag back. No questions to answer. Any help or advice??"

I would suggest that you first file a claim with the airline using their "Contact Us" info -

https://www.southwest.com/contact-us/contact-us.html

If the airline does not satisfactorily resolve the situation for you, you may file a claim with TSA using our "Claims" page -


https://www.tsa.gov/travel/passenger-support/claims

West
TSA Blog Team

Submitted by Fix The TSA on

It appears Bold TSApologist's new favorite word is "irrelevant".

She says Bob's misleading and reused photos posted on this gov't website are "irrelevant".

She had harped for months that the 95% failure rate by the TSA is "irrelevant." (I think Boldy's TSA screener friend or family member was part of the failures.)

And Boldy blames all of "droves" of TSA screeners quitting or getting fired on Pres. Obama and "bad pay." *shakes head*

Guess what, Boldy, Millions of private industry and public sector folks haven't gotten a raise in years either, yet we remain at our jobs, doing the work we are paid to do.

Weeks ago, Congress approved tens of millions of dollars for TSA to pay overtime and train new employees. You didn't know that, Bold TSApologist?

Submitted by Fix The TSA on

West, where is my reply to Bold TSApologist exposing her "9/11!" excuse as flawed?

Was it deleted? If so, this is not the first time comments by me that explain how 9/11 is not a valid excuse for TSA's current use of failed technology and intrusive assaults have been deleted. These comments met blog policy, and yet were deleted.

Was this current reply deleted by you, Bob, or "HQ Elements"? If not, please stop delaying its release.

Thanks in advance.

Submitted by Anonymous on

My thought on what might help (someone like myself) separate lines for people who carry on suitcases or several items and a different line for those who have no carry on or something that fits under the seat (i.e. Purse, small backpack).

Submitted by Anonymous on

I have taken two trips in the past 2 months. In each trip one leg (OKC and San Jose) had a line for precheck. However, the actual precheck line was not open. They told us going in we could leave shoes on, but other screenings would take place as though you did not have precheck. In San Jose, again we got in the precheck line. They did not tell us we would go through regular screening, so I didn't take my laptop out. Then I had to wait while an agent had time to screen my whole carry on bag. We have paid for precheck, so I don't understand why airports close down the screening.

Submitted by Mark on

I subscribed to Clear several years ago, sent in my info & paid my money. Then, they shut it down, kept my money. Fair?

Submitted by Fix The TSA on

The atrocious behavior by the TSA is not excused by the events of 9/11/11.

The latest set of intrusive policies and procedures of the TSA were implemented years after 9/11/11.

No planes fell out of the sky between 9/12/11 and when the naked pic scanners were foisted on the American public.

Boldy, did you travel between 9/12/11 and when the nudie scanners were installed?

Will West delete this reply like he did my original one?

Submitted by Fix The TSA on

West, you published my second reply to Boldy about her silly attempt to connect TSA's current abuse of the flying public, but not my third reply.

I split them up because I wanted to discover exactly what speech you, a government employee was suppressing on a government website.

As I suspected, since you, Bob, or "HQ elements" have deleted previous comments by me on the same topic.

1 of 2

Submitted by Fix The TSA on

West, you, Bob, or "HQ elements" have previously deleted multiple times this American citizen's speech.

You don't have to like what Americans say, but as long as the comment doesn't name a TSA screener and does not use swear words, you must post it according to your own policy.

You're continued suppression of citizens' speech while working as a government employee is not only gross, it's unConstitutional.

2 of 2

Submitted by Fix The TSA on

It is truly disgusting when any TSApologist uses the deaths of over 3000 innocent Americans...

1 of 3

Submitted by Fix The TSA on

Will West delete these reply like he did two of my previous replies to Boldy?

3 of 3

Submitted by Fix The TSA on

West, where did my comment "2 of 3" July 9, 2016 at 9:08am go? Why was it deleted?

More games and suppression of speech by government employees.

Submitted by Fix The TSA on

Obviously, I meant 9/11/01, 9/11/11. I type too fast sometimes and that tragedy feels more present than 15 years ago.

Submitted by Fix The TSA on

Still waiting for my July 9, 2016 "2 of 3" comment to appear. Submitted it several times already. Met blog policy.