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TSA Week in Review December 12th - 18th

Tuesday, December 20, 2016
Firearms Discovered in Carry-On Bags

TSA discovered 66 firearms last week in carry-on bags around the nation. Of the 66 firearms discovered, 61 were loaded and 24 had a round chambered. All of the firearms pictured were discovered last week. See a complete list below.

Knives

(L-R) Key Knives (ROA), Switchblade (ATL), Butterfly Knife (OAK), Brass Knuckle Knife (EWR)

TSA discovered 66 firearms last week in carry-on bags around the nation. Of the 66 firearms discovered, 61 were loaded and 24 had a round chambered.In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly in carry-on bags, our officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons, stun guns, small pocketknives and many other prohibited items too numerous to note.

When packed properly, ammunition can be transported in your checked baggage, but it is never permissible to pack ammo in your carry-on bag.

You can travel with your firearms in checked baggage, but they must first be declared to the airline.

You can go here for more details on how to properly travel with your firearms.

Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure.

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. The passenger can face a penalty as high as $11,000. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions; that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items.

*In order to provide a timely weekly update, this data is compiled from a preliminary report. The year-end numbers will vary slightly from what is reported in the weekly updates. However, any monthly, midyear or end-of-year numbers TSA provides on this blog or elsewhere will be actual numbers and not estimates.

Read our 2015 Year in Review post! If you haven’t read them yet, make sure you check out our year in review posts for 2011, 2012, 2013, and 2014.

Follow @TSA on Twitter and Instagram!

Bob Burns
TSA Social Media Team

Comments

Submitted by ANN RENE on

Unbelievable!!!!! And people have the right to be upset with TSA because why????

Submitted by Wintermute on

This comment has been removed by the author.

Submitted by Boldly on

Wintermute said...
Because of the Constitutional violations, perhaps?

could you elaborate on that? Which rights are being violated? I'm sure you aren't talking about the 4th. The supreme court has heard that case several times and has repeatedly rules that an administrative search is not a violation of ones rights. Also, since there are signs posted, passengers are warned in advance that they are subject to a search. So your opinion may be that it is a violation, but the facts and the laws do not agree.
So what rights are, by law being violated?

Submitted by Wintermute on

This comment has been removed by the author.

Submitted by GSOLTSO on

Wintermute sez - "The search performed by TSA exceeds the administrative search carved out by the supreme court."

Currently, this is simply your opinion (and others). The current court decisions, and legal departments of both TSA and DHS disagree with your statement.

West
TSA blog Team

Submitted by Wintermute on

This comment has been removed by the author.

Submitted by Wintermute on

This comment has been removed by the author.

Submitted by John Barker on

Boldly,
Why do you keep feeding them?

Submitted by GSOLTSO on

Wintermute sez - "Currently, no case regarding TSA searches has made it up to the Supremes, therefore your statement is misleading, at best."

So what you are saying is, my statement is completely factual and true, it just doesn't meet a certain level of legal adjudication to satisfy you? Just because a case has not been to the SCOTUS, does not mean that cases have not been filed and adjudicated. It simply means that none of these cases have risen to a level of recognition you require. I have not seen a single case filed against TSA disputing the search protocols (as defined by TSA to be correct), make it to a decision against the organization. If you do have a case that has been filed against TSA and won (stating that SOP definition of the search protocols is a violation of a persons rights), I would be more than interested to see it. My statement was as clear as can be (and to the best of my knowledge, it is 100% correct). I always like to learn new things, so if you have a new court case that is climbing the ladder, please include a link here.

To answer another question you asked in a direct message - No. I always post here under my name, without fail. If I have posted under an anonymous handle in the past, I still included my handle in the body of the message (I think that happened like twice back around 2008-09 and it was during a mad rush day).

West
TSA Blog Team

Submitted by Doober on

West, no case has yet been filed disputing the TSA's search protocol that calls for hands stuck down a passenger's pants or hands searching a passenger's genitals. You also know that these totally invasive searches are as a result of the TSA's 95% failure rate of testing done in 2015. Passengers are suffering indignities due to TSA’s failures.
"Although the Supreme Court hasn't evaluated airport screening technology, lower courts have emphasized, as the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit ruled in 2007, that "a particular airport security screening search is constitutionally reasonable provided that it 'is no more extensive nor intensive than necessary, in the light of current technology, to detect the presence of weapons or explosives.' "

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/11/24/AR201011...

Sadly, that "current technology" has an astounding failure rate which alone should be grounds for disallowing the violative searches the TSA practices.

You also know that the TSA's practice of forcing people into private rooms for searches is a violation of the administrative search protocol.

Finally, you know full well that TSA has thrown up obstacles to getting cases dealing with improper touching (a/k/a S.A.) heard in court, as such cases must be heard in federal courts and not local courts.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Submitted by GSOLTSO on

You are making an assumption that there is a process in the SOP that calls for what you indicate here. 2007 was a long time ago in relative terms. I have not seen a rash of cases filed, nor have I seen cases filed (against SOP) that have any kind of merit at all. You can make a case that you (or others) individually disagree with the security protocols, but the truth is that there has not been a serious uptick in court decisions (or filings for that matter) based upon SOP or security directives. You can make your case, but there simply is no court dockett/filings/decisions that you can point to and seriously indicate that TSA SOP or regulations violate citizens rights - it simply isnt there. I have not even seen a court case filed in reference to the private screening area regulations, and the legal department currently disagrees with your assertion that the private screening process TSA uses is a violation of the 4th Amendment.

West
TSA Blog Team

Submitted by Boldly on

john barker said...
Boldly,
Why do you keep feeding them?

I guess I get bored in my semi retirement,

Submitted by Boldly on

Doober said...
West, no case has yet been filed disputing the TSA's search protocol that calls for hands stuck down a passenger's pants or hands searching a passenger's genitals. You also know that these totally invasive searches are as a result of the TSA's 95% failure rate of testing done in 2015. Passengers are suffering indignities due to TSA’s failures.
"Although the Supreme Court hasn't evaluated airport screening technology, lower courts have emphasized, as the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit ruled in 2007, that "a particular airport security screening search is constitutionally reasonable provided that it 'is no more extensive nor intensive than necessary, in the light of current technology, to detect the presence of weapons or explosives.' "

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/11/24/AR201011...

Sadly, that "current technology" has an astounding failure rate which alone should be grounds for disallowing the violative searches the TSA practices.

You also know that the TSA's practice of forcing people into private rooms for searches is a violation of the administrative search protocol.

Finally, you know full well that TSA has thrown up obstacles to getting cases dealing with improper touching (a/k/a S.A.) heard in court, as such cases must be heard in federal courts and not local courts.


I assume you are posting this a fact, not opinion. If in fact you are posting this as factual, you should take it to court and get the entire TSA process changed. Clearly you know more about law than the TSA lawyers and those who have already taken these things to court. I suspect this is just your opinion...

Submitted by Wintermute on

This comment has been removed by the author.

Submitted by GSOLTSO on

Wintermute sez - "There's already a case in federal court with exactly this aim. And the TSA has, indeed, thrown every obstacle it can to make sure the case is never heard."

So, now the argument has turned to "I don't want legal minds that disagree with my interpretation of a law or Constitutional writing to use all of the legal devices provided to all the citizens of this country"? What you are calling obstacles, are actually legal processes and procedures used every day.

The situation is this - you (and some other folks) believe one way, the legal department of both DHS and TSA believe a different way. In the future, a court case may come along and garner a decision to support your position, currently that is not the situation - more to the point, most of the court cases I have seen filed deal with individual actions outside of policy, not the policy itself. You say there is a court case that has been filed now that is specifically addressing policy. I am not familiar with a case by "S.A". and I am interested to read up on it, could you provide a link or site for it?

**In the interest of disclosure for our readers, the article you list above is from 2010, and pertains to a technology that has not been in use for a few years (Backscatter Xray), and one that has been modified to such an extent that the image is a simple basic human form avatar (you can see a short video on the technology in action here.

West
TSA Blog Team

Submitted by Wintermute on

This comment has been removed by the author.

Submitted by Wintermute on

This comment has been removed by the author.

Submitted by GSOLTSO on

Wintermute sez - "Did I list an article?!"

I apologize for mistakenly attributing the listed article, a previous poster actually listed it. Please advise me as to which case you are referring?

Wintermute also sez - "Also, I appear to have gotten under someone's skin."

It appears that we are thinking the exact same thing!

West
TSA Blog Team