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TSA Week in Review: September 18th - 24th

Thursday, September 28, 2017
TSA discovered 86 firearms over the last week in carry-on bags around the nation. Of the 86 firearms discovered, 80 were loaded and 30 had a round chambered.

TSA discovered 86 firearms over the last week in carry-on bags around the nation. Of the 86 firearms discovered, 80 were loaded and 30 had a round chambered. Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. Travelers bringing firearms to the checkpoint can be arrested and fined up to $11,000. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure. You can go here for more details on how to properly travel with your firearms in checked baggage. All of the firearms pictured were discovered over the last week. See complete lists below.

Clockwise from the top left, these knives were discovered in carry-on bags at ABQ, SAV, SAN, IAH, BWI, HTS and ABQ.

Clockwise from the top left, these knives were discovered in carry-on bags at ABQ, SAV, SAN, IAH, BWI, HTS and ABQ. While all knives are prohibited in carry-on bags, they may be packed in checked baggage.

In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly in carry-on bags, our officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons, stun guns, small pocketknives and many other prohibited items too numerous to note.

TSA discovered 86 firearms over the last week in carry-on bags around the nation. Of the 86 firearms discovered, 80 were loaded and 30 had a round chambered. *In order to provide a timely weekly update, this data is compiled from a preliminary report. The year-end numbers will vary slightly from what is reported in the weekly updates. However, any monthly, midyear or end-of-year numbers TSA provides on this blog or elsewhere will be actual numbers and not estimates. 

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions; that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items.

If you haven’t read them yet, make sure you check out our year in review posts for 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015 and 2016. And don’t forget to check out our top 10 most unusual finds of 2016 video!

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Bob Burns

TSA Social Media

Comments

Submitted by Chip In Florida on

I just noticed that you are including the firearm caliber in your chart. Neat.

But also.... Why?

Why is caliber being tracked?

Submitted by Le on

As always, absolutely nothing you needed your slow, invasive, and ineffective naked body scanners to detect. Meanwhile, how many people suffered physical searches thanks to false alarms on these useless machines?

Why are Curtis Burns and West Cooper unwilling to address, let alone answer, that question?

How many weeks has it been since you last trumpeted something dangerous you found with the naked body scanners?

Submitted by RB on

And another Bob Burns Cut and Past submission. Not even trying anymore are you Bobbie?

Submitted by Jb on

BOS Terminal E.
I'm TSA-Pre qualified, the airline I'm flying on is a TSA-Pre participant, TSA-Pre is on my boarding pass.
Your associates tell me that they don't have a TSA-Pre lane and I have to go through the whole rigmarole
Why, then, should I even bother getting TSA-Pre qualified?

Submitted by Anonymous on

Outstanding job, TSA!

Submitted by RB on

The week in review posted on Thursday, September 28, 2017 has not had any comments posted as of 10/03/2017 14:37 CST.

If this is an example of "TSA Professionalism" I think we can all understand TSA much better.

I would suggest that TSA management find someone who really wants to do the job serving the public. The one in place now ain't getting the job done.

Submitted by Bored on

10/04/2017 9:50 CST. Still no comments posted.

Submitted by Anonymous on

TSA Week in Review: September 18th - 24th
posted on Thursday, September 28, 2017 by TSA.
...........................

and it's now 10/05/2017 13:10 CST and no comments since 9/28. I don't know if this is just another demonstration of TSA incompetence or TSA We Don't Care being displayed.

I was always told if you're going to do something, DO IT RIGHT.

TSA, not so much.

Submitted by RB on

12:00 hours on 10/06/217, how many days have elapsed since the Week in Review posting on 9/28/2017? Yet not one reader comment has been moderated since then, so where are Blogger Bob and West, or one of the invisible TSA Bloggers that hide in the shadows afraid to be known to the public?

You would think with a budget of $8,000,000,000.00 of taxpayers hard earned dollars each year TSA could at least operate a blog with a bit professionalism.

You would think that and be wrong!

Submitted by West Cooper on

Chip In Florida sez - "

I just noticed that you are including the firearm caliber in your chart. Neat.

But also.... Why?

Why is caliber being tracked?"

I have no official reasoning given to me. If I had to guess, it is because many folks refer to the caliber as a descriptor, a-la "I have a .45" or "I carry a .380". If I have some other clarification or explanation come across the wires, I will post it here.

TSA Blog Team