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Transportation Security Administration

It's National Customer Service Week. What Does TSA Do For You?

Friday, October 06, 2017
TSA's AskTSA Team

What’s the first thing you think of when you think of TSA? Airport? Transportation Security Officers?  TSA is all that but so much more. With TSA screening over 2 million passengers a day, it would be no surprise that some of our passengers may need assistance and guidance through security screening.  Here’s what you should know about all of our customer service resources.

Before you fly:

Have you ever started packing and had to stop to wonder if you could actually take “that” in your carry-on bag? You’re lying if you say you’ve never have! Well, now there’s an easy and convenient way to get those questions answered. Put those thumbs to use and tweet or direct message your questions to AskTSA. A customer representative is on hand to help answer those dire questions 8am-10pm ET weekdays; 9am-7pm weekends/holidays.

Are you traveling with a disability or medical condition and have questions or concerns? Contact the TSA Cares helpline 72 hours prior to traveling and a customer representative will help with your questions. For passengers requiring special accommodations, such as traveling with a service pet or medical device, a Passenger Support Specialist can be on hand in most airports to provide you on-the-spot assistance during the screening process.  All you have to do is call (855) 787-2227 or send an email to TSA Cares.

And how about information regarding policy, procedures and what to expect at the checkpoint? Check out TSA. GOV. Our interactive website offers tons of useful and helpful information. You’re always two clicks away from getting the information you need! While you’re there, be sure to check out our travel tips page. We think you might get a kick out of it.

Guess what? We’re even on YouTube! You can learn all about how TSA protects the traveling public. While you’re at it, watch our travel tip videos to learn how to get through security with ease.

While at airport security:

You’ve arrived at the checkpoint and realize, “I may need some help.” Whether you’ve misplaced your I.D or need assistance folding your baby’s stroller, a Transportation Security Officer is always on hand to provide assistance. All you have to do is ask.

On your arrival at your destination:

You safely arrived to your destination but oh no! You forgot your laptop at the checkpoint during screening.  For all lost or misplaced items from the checkpoint, you can reach out to the AskTSA team mentioned above, or you can contact your airport’s lost and found. You can also find information on how to submit a claim on items that may have been damaged during the screening. Hey, things happen sometimes.

So not only is TSA protecting the traveling public, but we’re also providing guidance to travelers, ensuring their airport experience goes as smoothly as possible.

TSA Social Media

Comments

Submitted by RB on

When I think of TSA and its security screeners I think of inconvenience, mistreatment, being disrespected, and having my body inappropriately handled all while trying to make sure that some TSA employee doesn't steal my stuff as nearly happened at FLL. Of course the FSD of FLL at the time didn't conduct a proper investigation so the TSA employee is likely still on the job pilfering stuff from other people.

I think TSA view of itself is grossly incorrect.

Submitted by Really? on

No mention of your ongoing abuse of and sexual assaults against passengers because you invested in technology that doesn't work?

Submitted by Ask Tom Sawyer on

You remember him. Your poorly trained, unprofessional screeners left him covered in his own urine because you bought technology that doesn't work.

Submitted by Don Cochron on

Security checks are always a bit inconvenient but in my opinion TSA has been trying with some measure of success to make the procedure better.

Submitted by Abhranil Dutta ... on

I have to say it means alot to me actually

Submitted by RB on

Before you fly:

"Have you ever started packing and had to stop to wonder if you could actually take “that” in your carry-on bag? You’re lying if you say you’ve never have! Well, now there’s an easy and convenient way to get those questions answered. Put those thumbs to use and tweet or direct message your questions to AskTSA. A customer representative is on hand to help answer those dire questions 8am-10pm ET weekdays; 9am-7pm weekends/holidays."
......................................

Given TSA's habit of blocking tweeter accounts of U.S. citizens in violation of the First Amendment asking a question at @AskTSA is impssible for a growing number of travelers.

Submitted by S Richart on

"Security checks are always a bit inconvenient but in my opinion TSA has been trying with some measure of success to make the procedure better."

I guess you don't read @TSA much, do you? It's getting far worse and more and more passengers are being sexually assaulted by TSA every day.

Submitted by Max Yost on

In addition to all the other things you do for "us", I would like to point out that you also violate the public's First Amendment right of free speech on a routine basis. I cite the recent federal case: Davison vs the Loudoun Board of Supervisors (https://tinyurl.com/ybrxthyq) in which a federal judge ruled that government officials could not block commenters from official public websites. I have been blocked repeatedly on @askTSA, @TSA and on Lisa Farbstein's official media page. I'm not the only citizen who has been blocked from official TSA social media sites for daring to disagree with the TSA. Are you going to voluntarily fix this or will several of us have to go to federal court and sue?

Submitted by Chip In Florida on

Two million screenings a day you say. That makes, what, Fourteen million screenings in a week?

That many screenings and you only manage to find about eighty firearms? That means one of two things..... You are grossly incompetent. Or the firearms you find aren't a threat to aviation.

I guess there is a third option and that would be that TSA is the best way to waste eight billion dollars a year.

Submitted by S Richart on

"Have you ever started packing and had to stop to wonder if you could actually take “that” in your carry-on bag? You’re lying if you say you’ve never have! Well, now there’s an easy and convenient way to get those questions answered. Put those thumbs to use and tweet or direct message your questions to AskTSA. A customer representative is on hand to help answer those dire questions 8am-10pm ET weekdays; 9am-7pm weekends/holidays."

That's all well and good EXCEPT for the fact that TSA, using "screener discretion" allows a screener to confiscate ANYTHING, no matter what is on a website or what a TSA rep advises.

And, please, West, don't give me your usual drivel that TSA never confiscates anything because you know full well, or should know, the screeners confiscate every day.

Submitted by West Cooper on

S.Richart sez - "And, please, West, don't give me your usual drivel that TSA never confiscates anything because you know full well, or should know, the screeners confiscate every day."

Except, TSA does not confiscate. Certain items (Firearms, Explosives, Incendiaries, and the like) are controlled until local LEOs arrive, and then they take control of said items. Any other item, a passenger has the option to leave the chackpoint and consume/use, place in a car, mail home, give to a friend/family/stranger or make some other form of arrangement for the item. If a passenger does not avail themselves of the above options, they can voluntarily give the items to TSA for disposal. This has been consistent - for many years, this has been the case, and I anticipate that it will be the case for the foreseeable future (barring a tech change that gives us better options to screen LGAs).

TSA Blog Team

Submitted by John Romanowicz on

I ask TSA for a chair to take off my shoes at JFK last week. I explained to the TSA officer that I had a bad back and I can not bend to take off my shoes. I would call that a medical problem. The reply was we have no chair and they were not so nice. I explain that you should be nice to the customers. I then seat on the belt and TSA officer stared to yell and cream. I was fast enough to get my shores off. Why can't TSA have chairs. The same day my wife put plastic bags on her feet so she would not get contaminated from the dirty flood and was told to take them off but I could go with socks and it was OK. Is socks in but plastic bags dangerous? I travel a lot and all airports in and out of USA always check my camera bag. No such check at JFK. I was little surprised.

Hope we hear your reply

Submitted by RB on

Submitted by John Romanowicz on Tue, 2017-10-17 19:06
I ask TSA for a chair to take off my shoes at JFK last week. I explained to the TSA officer that I had a bad back and I can not bend to take off my shoes. I would call that a medical problem. The reply was we have no chair and they were not so nice. I explain that you should be nice to the customers. I then seat on the belt and TSA officer stared to yell and cream. I was fast enough to get my shores off. Why can't TSA have chairs. The same day my wife put plastic bags on her feet so she would not get contaminated from the dirty flood and was told to take them off but I could go with socks and it was OK. Is socks in but plastic bags dangerous? I travel a lot and all airports in and out of USA always check my camera bag. No such check at JFK. I was little surprised.

Hope we hear your reply

..........................
Not a reply from TSA but....

You experienced TSA's standard level of Customer Service.

And a question for West or anyone else associated with the TSA Blog,

It was stated that travlers with special needs should contact TSA Cares 72 hours prior to their flight. But....... on the TSA.Gov web pages is this passage:

https://www.tsa.gov/travel/passenger-support

"Passenger Support Specialists
Travelers requiring special accommodations or concerned about the security screening process at the airport may ask a TSA officer or supervisor for a passenger support specialist who can provide on-the-spot assistance."

I would say that a traveler can ask for a Passenger Support Specialist when they arrive at the check point. So which statement is correct?