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Transportation Security Administration

TSA Week in Review: November 20th - 26th

Wednesday, November 29, 2017
TSA discovered 57 firearms over the last week in carry-on bags around the nation. Of the 57 firearms discovered, 50 were loaded and 19 had a round chambered.

TSA discovered 57 firearms over the last week in carry-on bags around the nation. Of the 57 firearms discovered, 50 were loaded and 19 had a round chambered. Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. Travelers bringing firearms to the checkpoint can be arrested and fined up to $11,000. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure. You can go here for more details on how to properly travel with your firearms in checked baggage. All of the firearms pictured were discovered over the last week. See complete lists below.

These four smoke grenades were discovered in a checked bag at Dallas Love Filed (DAL).

These four smoke grenades were discovered in a checked bag at Dallas Love Filed (DAL). Items such as these can lead to a complete shutdown and evacuation.

This stun cane was discovered with a traveler’s carry-on belongings at the Pittsburgh International Airport (PIT).

This stun cane was discovered with a traveler’s carry-on belongings at the Pittsburgh International Airport (PIT). All stun devices must be safely packed in checked baggage.

From the top these items were discovered in carry-on bags at GSO, DTW and IAH. While all knives and swords are prohibited in carry-on bags, they may be packed in checked baggage.

From the top these items were discovered in carry-on bags at GSO, DTW and IAH. While all knives and swords are prohibited in carry-on bags, they may be packed in checked baggage.

Checkpoint and checked baggage screening acts as a deterrent to keep those with ill will from attempting to cause catastrophic damage to an aircraft. In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly in carry-on bags, our officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons, stun guns, small pocket knives and many other prohibited items too numerous to note.

TSA discovered 57 firearms over the last week in carry-on bags around the nation. Of the 57 firearms discovered, 50 were loaded and 19 had a round chambered. *In order to provide a timely weekly update, this data is compiled from a preliminary report. The year-end numbers will vary slightly from what is reported in the weekly updates. However, any monthly, midyear or end-of-year numbers TSA provides on this blog or elsewhere will be actual numbers and not estimates. 

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions; that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items.

If you haven’t read them yet, make sure you check out our year in review posts for 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015 and 2016. And don’t forget to check out our top 10 most unusual finds of 2016 video!

Follow @TSA on Twitter and Instagram and Like Us on Facebook. Have a question? Ask TSA on Twitter or Facebook Messenger

Bob Burns

TSA Social Media

Comments

Submitted by RB on

Not keeping score but Atlanta looks like a firearm hotbed.

I wonder what new scheme TSA dreamed up this week to screw with travelers?

I'd ask that question at TSA's social media account @AskTSA, a 100% taxpayer funded government site, but some criminal at TSA blocks citizens and by doing so violates citizens constitutional rights.

Submitted by Chip In Florida on

It would be really cool if you added a column to that chart indicating what technology discovered the firearms listed.

Submitted by Sl on

As always, absolutely nothing you needed your slow, invasive, and ineffective naked body scanners to detect. Meanwhile, how many people suffered physical searches thanks to false alarms on these useless machines?

Why are Curtis Burns and West Cooper unwilling to address, let alone answer, that question?

How many weeks has it been since you last trumpeted something dangerous you found with the naked body scanners?

Submitted by James Elsea on

Unbelievable that people are so hard headed and have not learned by now, to leave your weapons at home.

Submitted by Rick C on

Funny you should say that - I noticed ATL showing up over and over too. I'd think these honors would go to other states where guns are more common (Texas, Arkansas, etc)

Submitted by Ian Duell on

A 21,year old that turned 21 in September after he arrived in Kansas. His license expired in October. In Indiana you can not get your new license as a 21 cause it is a different license. He can’t get a Kansas ID because he does not have a permanent address so how does he get an Id to fly. Tickets bought and flying dec 11th

Submitted by Chip In Florida on

"...Items such as these can lead to a complete shutdown and evacuation."

Sure they CAN. The question is DID they?

Submitted by West Cooper on

We have a process that allows us to get people with no ID/expired ID through the checkpoint in order to make their flights. The process does require some additional time, so please make certain that the individual arrives at the checkpoint earlier than normal to accomdate the additional time requirements.

TSA Blog Team

Submitted by Nobody on

Your license is valid for screening purposes up to 12 months after expiration. (Not positive later on in 2018 after the new ID act kicks in) hope this helps

Submitted by RB on

If a person is properly screened by TSA then why does ID matter?

It should not be up to TSA to decide if a person has the Constitutional "RIGHT" to travel freely.

Submitted by Not West on

Why is ID even required? If TSAs screening procedures are so robust, and the TSA has done its job, then it doesn't matter whether a particular flight is full of terrorists, and not a single one will have a means to create terror.

Submitted by T Sheldon on

In the weekly list have you considered indicating whether the individual was a passenger or a TSO and whether the individual was arrested? Might be telling since it seems the passenger is always arrested when employees from the TSA get a free "oops" pass like the TSO at Manchester-Boston on December 2, 2017 did. I am amazed at the lack of accountability at the TSA.

Submitted by JP on

So in your world, people can fly without identification as long as they get screened. What happens when you have that fugitive on the run? Is it okay to just let him or her fly because TSA screened them successfully? Is it okay to let that non custodial parent take a child out of the country when an AMBER alert is active for that child and that adult being a suspect. Just curious.

Submitted by Ismat Butt on

I traveled from Washington D.C. to London by British Airways flight BA216 on the 18th of October 2017. I was using the TSA certified lock on my suitcase - the bag had been inspected by TSA at the Washington D.C. airport and a 'Notice of Baggage Inspection' was in my suitcase but the lock to my bag was missing. I thought that maybe the personnel had dropped the lock in the bag, but after unpacking completely I could not find the lock. This is the second lock I have lost a lock in a similar manner - it is suggested the personnel be a little more attentive to locking the bag back with the original 'TSA approved' lock that they unlock to inspect the bag. Thanks

Submitted by RB on

Submitted by JP on Wed, 2017-12-06 15:57
So in your world, people can fly without identification as long as they get screened. What happens when you have that fugitive on the run? Is it okay to just let him or her fly because TSA screened them successfully? Is it okay to let that non custodial parent take a child out of the country when an AMBER alert is active for that child and that adult being a suspect. Just curious.
.....................

TSA is not a law enforcement agency. The only legal authority TSA has is a limited Administrative Search for Weapons, Explosives, and Incendiaries.

That's it, TSA should be doing nothing else.

Submitted by Not West on

JP,

Is it TSAs mission to catch fugitives or locate missing children? I think you just answered your question.

Submitted by Mse on

thank god for TSA!

Submitted by SSSS For Some Reason on

Submitted by JP "...So in your world, people can fly without identification as long as they get screened. What happens when you have that fugitive on the run?"

First, the TSA doesn't have the power or authority to detain anyone, they don't have any law enforcement abilities so they don't have the authority to stop the fugitive on the run.

Second, the TSA isn't comparing your ID to any list of 'known fugitives' so how would they know? That person asking to see your id? They are no different than the Bouncer in front of the club, they are checking the ID is not a counterfeit.

Third, which is just repeating one and two in a different way.... how is the TSA going to know that the adult is the non-custodial parent of that child? The child doesn't have an ID.

Submitted by Seeking Info on

RB - Can you please point me to where in the constitution it says a person has the constitutional right to travel freely by air?

Submitted by Seeking Info on

RB - Can you please point me to where in the constitution it says a person has the constitutional right to travel freely by air?

Submitted by R Duzan on

I'm thankful that TSA is identifying and removing firearms from baggage. I'm hoping the people responsible are removed from the flight and fined. There is absolutely no excuse I can can think of that's legitimate, unless you're a law officer with a reason. "I forgot that I packed a gun"...what? Gun violence in this country is tragic and the highest in civilized countries. The TSA was organized to protect U.S. citizens, and I appreciate their expertise. I'm sure they make mistakes, but I'm sure they make mistakes on the side of safety.

Submitted by RB on

Submitted by Seeking Info on Sat, 2017-12-16 17:30
RB - Can you please point me to where in the constitution it says a person has the constitutional right to travel freely by air?
...............................
Asking that question demonstrates a complete lack of understanding of the Constitution. Rights are not granted by government.

Submitted by SSSS For Some Reason on

"...where in the constitution it says a person has the constitutional right to travel freely by air?"

You have it backwards. The Constitution doesn't define what rights we have as Citizens. It defines the limits we the people place on our government. So the question should be where in the Constitution does it say the TSA has the authority to hinder a citizen from traveling freely among these many States.

While you work on your answer allow me to remind you what the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution says....

The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.

Submitted by RB on

Submitted by Seeking Info on Sat, 2017-12-16 17:33
RB - Can you please point me to where in the constitution it says a person has the constitutional right to travel freely by air?

.................

Since you asked twice I will answer twice. I hope you can grasp just how ignorant your question is. I challenge you to point to the passage in the Constitution that restricts freedom to travel.

Submitted by Anonymouse on

@RB What do you mean the rights are not granted by the government? The Constitution was written be people in government. The Constitution is amended with amendments by people in the government. You have the right of freedom of religion, bear arms, and to vote because the people that run this government said we could. With this being said the Constitution is so old that ACTs and amendments have to be added to deal with newer situations. We as Americans have the Freedom of Movement. But nowhere in the old judicial ruling does it state about flying. Granted commercial airlines did not exist in the 1800s. We have the right to move from state to state or leave the country and return without fear of not being allowed back into the country. The Aviation and Transportation Security Act grants TSA and private security companies the right to refuse an individual to fly if such individual refuses to be searched. Whether privatized or federalized the security will be the same.

P.S. I know anonymouse is misspelled.

Submitted by RB on

Submitted by Anonymouse on Sun, 2017-12-31 01:27
@RB What do you mean the rights are not granted by the government? The Constitution was written be people in government. The Constitution is amended with amendments by people in the government. You have the right of freedom of religion, bear arms, and to vote because the people that run this government said we could. With this being said the Constitution is so old that ACTs and amendments have to be added to deal with newer situations. We as Americans have the Freedom of Movement. But nowhere in the old judicial ruling does it state about flying. Granted commercial airlines did not exist in the 1800s. We have the right to move from state to state or leave the country and return without fear of not being allowed back into the country. The Aviation and Transportation Security Act grants TSA and private security companies the right to refuse an individual to fly if such individual refuses to be searched. Whether privatized or federalized the security will be the same.

P.S. I know anonymouse is misspelled.

..........................................
The statement stands on its on, government does not grant rights.

https://legaldictionary.net/inalienable-rights/

What are Inalienable Rights
The Declaration of Independence gives three examples of inalienable rights, in the well-known phrase, “Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness.” These fundamental rights are endowed on every human being by his or her Creator, and are often referred to as “natural rights.” Only under carefully limited circumstances can such natural rights be taken away as people have the freedom to exercise them as they choose.

The framers of the Constitution acknowledged the inalienable rights of man in this powerful phrase from the Declaration of Independence:

“We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.”

The founding fathers intended the government of the new nation to have the sole charge of protecting the inalienable rights of its citizens, and made that clear as they stated:

“That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, – That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new government …”

While there is not a specific list of rights that are considered inalienable in the Constitution, there are some rights that are generally accepted as natural rights of man. The list is extensive, and the following are but a few:

To act in self-defense
To own private property
To work and enjoy the fruits of one’s labor
*******To move freely within the county or to another country*******
To worship or refrain from worshipping within a freely-chosen religion
To be secure in one’s home
To think freely