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TSA Week in Review - February 19th - 22nd: 62 Firearms Discovered in Carry-on Bags

Wednesday, February 28, 2018
TSA discovered 62 firearms in carry-on bags around the nation last week. Of the 62 firearms discovered, 55 were loaded and 20 had a round chambered.

TSA discovered 62 firearms in carry-on bags around the nation last week. Of the 62 firearms discovered, 55 were loaded and 20 had a round chambered. Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. TSA may impose civil penalties of up to $13,066 per violation per person for prohibited items violations and violations of other TSA regulations. Repeat violations will result in higher penalties. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure. You can go here for more details on how to properly travel with your firearms in checked baggage. All of the firearms pictured were discovered over the last week. See complete lists below.

The ammunition pictured here was packed in a carry-on bag at the Nashville International Airport (BNA).

If packed properly, ammunition can be transported in checked-baggage. The ammunition pictured here was packed in a carry-on bag at the Nashville International Airport (BNA). You can go here for more details on how to properly travel with ammunition in checked baggage.

This knife was discovered concealed in a vitamin bottle at the George Bush Intercontinental Airport (IAH).

This knife was discovered concealed in a vitamin bottle at the George Bush Intercontinental Airport (IAH). All knives are prohibited in carry-on bags, and concealed knives can lead to arrest and fines. Knives may be packed in checked bags.

These 4 replica grenades were discovered in a carry-on bag at the Baltimore-Washington International Airport (BWI).

We don’t know if replica or inert items are live until our explosives professionals take a closer look and eventually open the bag. That takes time and slows down the line. It can even lead to a complete shutdown and evacuation. Real, inert, or anything resembling an explosive item is prohibited in both carry-on and checked baggage. These 4 replica grenades were discovered in a carry-on bag at the Baltimore-Washington International Airport (BWI).

From left to right, these prohibited items were discovered in carry-on bags at DEN, CLT, SAN, IAH, IAH and BNA.

From left to right, these prohibited items were discovered in carry-on bags at DEN, CLT, SAN, IAH, IAH and BNA. While these items are prohibited in carry-on bags, they may be packed in checked baggage. However, familiarize yourself with local laws as concealed weapons and martial arts weapons are illegal in parts of the U.S.

TSA discovered 62 firearms in carry-on bags around the nation last week. Of the 62 firearms discovered, 55 were loaded and 20 had a round chambered. Checkpoint and checked baggage screening acts as a deterrent to keep those with ill will from attempting to cause catastrophic damage to an aircraft. In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly in carry-on bags, our officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons, stun guns, small pocket knives and many other prohibited items too numerous to note.

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions; that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items.

If you haven’t read them yet, make sure you check out our year in review posts for 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016 and 2017.

And don’t forget to check out our top 10 most unusual finds videos for 2016 & 2017.

Follow @TSA on Twitter and Instagram and Like Us on Facebook. Have a question? Ask TSA on Twitter or Facebook Messenger

Bob Burns

TSA Social Media

Comments

Submitted by Nocaps on

i see that orlando airport is looking at removing the tsa from screening due to the time that passengers wait and the ineffectiveness of the management there to make adjustments. my question is, if the tsa employees are removed and replaced by private companies aren't the tsa still the management at the airport? so by removing the tsa employees but not the management aren't they failing to address their reason for removing them?
since everyone here likes to use numbers, how do the private companies compare to the government in terms of detection? tsa provides these numbers to congress, are the private companies required to provide this information?

Submitted by Ey on

As always, absolutely nothing you needed your slow, invasive, and ineffective naked body scanners to detect. Meanwhile, how many people suffered physical searches thanks to false alarms on these useless machines?

Why are Curtis Burns and West Cooper unwilling to address, let alone answer, that question?

How many weeks has it been since you last trumpeted something dangerous you found with the naked body scanners?

Submitted by RB on

"We don’t know if replica or inert items are live....."

Once again, replica or inert items cannot be live. They may have the appearance of the real deal but your statement as presented is factually incorrect.

Perhaps a better statement would be something like this; We don't know if an item that looks like a weapon is real or not until we inspect it. Inert or replica weapons are not permitted.

Might want to get a refund on that college degree Bobbie.

Submitted by RB on

Submitted by Nocaps on Thu, 2018-03-01 03:04
i see that orlando airport is looking at removing the tsa from screening due to the time that passengers wait and the ineffectiveness of the management there to make adjustments. my question is, if the tsa employees are removed and replaced by private companies aren't the tsa still the management at the airport? so by removing the tsa employees but not the management aren't they failing to address their reason for removing them?
since everyone here likes to use numbers, how do the private companies compare to the government in terms of detection? tsa provides these numbers to congress, are the private companies required to provide this information?
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Going to contract screeners moves TSA into an oversight position which is really all that TSA should be in the first place. Contract screeners, while working at the same standards as TSA screeners, have their jobs on the line unlike federal employees who have little incentive to perform above level of an amoeba. It also removes people from taxpayer paid jobs which benefits taxpayers.

I would encourage MCO to get the dead weight of TSA out of the airport to the maximum extent possible.

Submitted by John on

How many weeks have you cut & pasted this same question?

Submitted by John on

Private screening sure we'll well on 9/11. Better re-think your position RB

Submitted by Smith on

Who cares RB? The TSA will be around long after you're not.

Submitted by Nocaps on

how much money of will this save tax payers? do you have facts to provide that state that contract employees are held to a higher level of accountability that tsa employees? i am curious as to what type of employees the private company will hire? would they hire the recently released tsa employees seeing that they already have the training on procedures that are currently being used? as a private company will the company be looking to gain a profit? what steps will this company use to ensure that they are not losing money?

Submitted by Anonymous on

Amen to that, Nocaps!

Submitted by BR on

TSA have their jobs on the line the same as the contract screener. Don't be surprised if at least half of the "contract" screeners are the same just rehired TSA officers, as they are already trained. I love it RB that you are so miserable in your life that you continually troll this site. Some of your comments are hilariously so uninformed. I bet Bob gets a good weekly laugh from your scripted comments!

Submitted by RB on

Great job TSA you people assaulted an 84 year old holocaust survivor. You TSA screeners should be proud being able to abuse the elderly.

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/holocaust-survivor-eva-mozes-kor-tsa-put-me...

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. -- A Holocaust survivor says she was a victim of a "very demeaning body search" by U.S. Transportation Security Administration agents after a visit in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Eva Mozes Kor tweeted on Sunday in Albuquerque that she had to undergo the intrusive body search before boarding a plane and that it ruined her experience following a lecture.

Submitted by RB on

Submitted by John on Thu, 2018-03-01 21:33
Private screening sure we'll well on 9/11. Better re-think your position RB
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No need to rethink my position. The security screeners in place on 9/11 screened passengers using government mandated security standards which did not prohibit knives or other bladed items. Cockpit doors were not lock and both pilots and passengers had been taught to cooperate with hijackers.

So if you want to look for someone to blame for 9/11 blame the government, the people who screen passengers today.

Submitted by RB on

Submitted by Smith on Thu, 2018-03-01 21:46
Who cares RB? The TSA will be around long after you're not.
................................
Perhaps so but that means I have a lot of years left to state my opposition to the criminals of TSA.

Submitted by RB on

Submitted by BR on Mon, 2018-03-05 12:48
TSA have their jobs on the line the same as the contract screener. Don't be surprised if at least half of the "contract" screeners are the same just rehired TSA officers, as they are already trained. I love it RB that you are so miserable in your life that you continually troll this site. Some of your comments are hilariously so uninformed. I bet Bob gets a good weekly laugh from your scripted comments!
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I'm certainly not miserable in my life.

When a TSA screener tried to steal from me and TSA did nothing to rectify that situation I decided then and there to be an opponent of TSA. If TSA wants to finally address that matter then I am open to a resolution. If not then expect me to continue here and on other forums.

I have no problem with government screeners hiring on to contract screening companies. That at least gets them off the public payroll and ends the exceptionally generous government benefits package.

Submitted by RB on

Blocking citizens from TSA's various social media accounts is routinely done to silence dissenting voices. As TSA's social media manager, Blogger Bob, must either be the person directing these actions are actually doing the blocking himself. A federal court case for Twitter blocking by government employees is soon to have oral arguments heard. I hope TSA is paying attention to this case because TSA employees may be the next people named in a similar lawsuit.

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2018/mar/07/trump-twitter-first-amen...

"Blocked by Trump on Twitter – now crusaders take their case to court"

Be a real shame to see what happens after it is proven that some TSA employees have violated their Oath to uphold the United States Constitution, even the parts they seem to not like. No immunity for willful misconduct.

Submitted by BRR on

SOOOOO TRUE LOL

Submitted by TSAScreener on

I am a TSA screener and would like to thank everyone that has ever flown. Without you I would not have this job. I do believe I am making a difference by providing security at my airport. Some believe that there is no danger and I am not saying to live in fear but I would hate myself if something does ever happen and it was from my airport duty station.
Thank you all for for flying whether it's for business, pleasure, or out of necessity. Susan, RB,SSSS, Chip, and whomever I have left out, I really appreciate it if any of you has ever flown within the United States. Like I said before thanks to you I have a job.
P.S.
I don't disagree with all your comments you have valid points. But there has to be a middle ground or some compromise to ensure security will not fail. I've always thought that customer service and security go hand in hand.

Submitted by SSSS For Some Reason on

"...These 4 replica grenades were discovered in a carry-on bag at the Baltimore-Washington International Airport (BWI)"

And once they were determined to be plastic replica were they allowed to fly? If not, why not?

Submitted by Nocaps on

so now we know your agenda and that makes any of your statements as biased.

Submitted by Nocaps on

was there 100 percent checked luggage screening before tsa? what were the test failure rates of those checking passengers pre-9/11?

Submitted by Buck on

You point out the technical inaccuracy of the statement and offer your equally vague description. Why not go do the job and see what its like dealing nitpicking braniacs like yourself.

Submitted by Max101 on

It's already been decided in federal court and the government lost (Loudoun County, Virginia, in this case) Davison vs Loudoun County: https://law.justia.com/cases/federal/district-courts/virginia/vaedce/1:2....

We, The People, are going to have to find a good lawyer who will take the case pro bono because Francine and the rest of the TSA will simply ignore the federal judge's ruling concerning government censorship of official social media accounts.

Submitted by RB on

Submitted by TSAScreener on Wed, 2018-03-07 16:56
I am a TSA screener and would like to thank everyone that has ever flown. Without you I would not have this job. I do believe I am making a difference by providing security at my airport. Some believe that there is no danger and I am not saying to live in fear but I would hate myself if something does ever happen and it was from my airport duty station.
Thank you all for for flying whether it's for business, pleasure, or out of necessity. Susan, RB,SSSS, Chip, and whomever I have left out, I really appreciate it if any of you has ever flown within the United States. Like I said before thanks to you I have a job.
P.S.
I don't disagree with all your comments you have valid points. But there has to be a middle ground or some compromise to ensure security will not fail. I've always thought that customer service and security go hand in hand.

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Thanks for your comment. I don't think all TSA employees are bad but TSA certainly seems blessed with a high percentage of less than desirable workers. I do believe that many TSA procedures are wrong, some morally, and should not be allowed unless very strong evidence is presented to justify such actions. I also believe that the ETD and WBI devices are not suitable for the purpose intended. I don't think what TSA does to people is worth the cost, especially the moral cost.

Submitted by Cindy M on

Replying to TSA Screener- I don't know if you are for real or not but I will take you at your word. I fly a couple times a year because there is no other way to get to my destination. Having suffered 3 enhanced patdowns, I have changed my opinion of TSA. I am married to an Army officer with 21 years of service. I understand security concerns from a different perspective than perhaps most Americans. When the complaining started about TSA, I counseled friends to cheerfully cooperate. Removing shoes, segregating small bottles of liquids, or submitting to a body scan I argued were small inconveniences to ensure safety. My attitude has changed. I no longer feel safe entering the security checkpoints. I view TSA procedures as capricious and inconsistent. I feel threatened by your agents. For a variety of reasons I will not go into, these patdowns leave me traumatized and depressed which is no way to start a visit with family or a vacation. When the scanners were introduced I believed they were an improvement. Now however, I see that the machines don't spot real problems. Instead they seem to be confused by a variety of normal things such as sequins, metal, or other sorts of embellishments on clothing. The last time my husband and I flew, the scanner alerted on some embellishments on my trousers. My husband was wearing regular blue jeans, neither too loose nor too tight but the scanner alerted on him as well. So at the same time my crotch was being touched by an agent his crotch was being touched by another agent. Our pockets were empty. Regarding the explosives detector, I haven't handled a firearm or even a sparkler in 30 years. Unfortunately 80 percent of the soaps and lotions I use contain glycerin and that seems to have earned me a full body invasive patdown during and after which I was treated like a criminal. BTW, nothing was found hiding in my underpants, bra, or between my legs. If I believed that having my most private parts touched by your surly personnel was necessary for effective security I might submit graciously. At this point the anxiety I experience trying to make it through security has altered my thinking on how you are carrying out your mission. The report about the CNN correspondent in Detroit as well as stories about the way transgender people are flagged, and the story about the 84 year old woman who was recently subjected to an enhanced patdown only serve to reinforce my view that something is very wrong in your shop. It's broken and Congress as well as the airlines need to fix it. No child should have to submit to a stranger touching them in order to visit grandma or go to Disney World. Talking to fellow travelers, it's clear to me that lots of people are reassessing their attitude toward being felt up by a stranger in order to complete the simple act of getting on an airplane.

Submitted by RB on

Submitted by Cindy M on Mon, 2018-03-12 09:12
Replying to TSA Screener- I don't know if you are for real or not but I will take you at your word. I fly a couple times a year because there is no other way to get to my destination. Having suffered 3 enhanced patdowns, I have changed my opinion of TSA. I am married to an Army officer with 21 years of service. I understand security concerns from a different perspective than perhaps most Americans. When the complaining started about TSA, I counseled friends to cheerfully cooperate. Removing shoes, segregating small bottles of liquids, or submitting to a body scan I argued were small inconveniences to ensure safety. My attitude has changed. I no longer feel safe entering the security checkpoints. I view TSA procedures as capricious and inconsistent. I feel threatened by your agents. For a variety of reasons I will not go into, these patdowns leave me traumatized and depressed which is no way to start a visit with family or a vacation. When the scanners were introduced I believed they were an improvement. Now however, I see that the machines don't spot real problems. Instead they seem to be confused by a variety of normal things such as sequins, metal, or other sorts of embellishments on clothing. The last time my husband and I flew, the scanner alerted on some embellishments on my trousers. My husband was wearing regular blue jeans, neither too loose nor too tight but the scanner alerted on him as well. So at the same time my crotch was being touched by an agent his crotch was being touched by another agent. Our pockets were empty. Regarding the explosives detector, I haven't handled a firearm or even a sparkler in 30 years. Unfortunately 80 percent of the soaps and lotions I use contain glycerin and that seems to have earned me a full body invasive patdown during and after which I was treated like a criminal. BTW, nothing was found hiding in my underpants, bra, or between my legs. If I believed that having my most private parts touched by your surly personnel was necessary for effective security I might submit graciously. At this point the anxiety I experience trying to make it through security has altered my thinking on how you are carrying out your mission. The report about the CNN correspondent in Detroit as well as stories about the way transgender people are flagged, and the story about the 84 year old woman who was recently subjected to an enhanced patdown only serve to reinforce my view that something is very wrong in your shop. It's broken and Congress as well as the airlines need to fix it. No child should have to submit to a stranger touching them in order to visit grandma or go to Disney World. Talking to fellow travelers, it's clear to me that lots of people are reassessing their attitude toward being felt up by a stranger in order to complete the simple act of getting on an airplane.

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No way to like a comment on this antiquated page.

Thank you! Not much can be added but how do these TSA screeners look their mothers, fathers, wives, husbands or children in the eyes each day knowing what they have done or agreed to do? Normal people of good morals and values would refuse to do these things.

Submitted by Cindy M on

Why is someone allowed to call another commenter in this blog a "nitpicking brainiac"? I thought personal attacks were not allowed. In fact, I speculated that TSA was being run by people with psycho-sexual mental illness and that comment was disallowed. I assumed it didn't make it past the moderator because it was viewed as a personal attack although it was aimed at management in general and not a specific individual. It now appears that personal attacks are allowed. But you have to be selective in your targeting.

Submitted by John on

different name - same cut & paste.

Submitted by John on

Fake news.

Submitted by John on

Or you could enjoy life.

Submitted by John on

That's not how it works RB. When a private company takes over an airport the federal workers stay federal workers. They simply transfer to other airports or agencies. No reduction in federal cost.

Submitted by John on

How would a passenger know they're a replica if they were allowed to fly?

Submitted by RB on

Submitted by Nocaps on Thu, 2018-03-08 02:45
so now we know your agenda and that makes any of your statements as biased.
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No question that I have an agenda. I hate seeing the Constitution of the United States shredded by the likes of TSA and its employees.