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Transportation Security Administration

TSA Year in Review: A Record Setting 2018

Thursday, February 07, 2019
2018 Guns image

It has been a milestone year for TSA as 2018 was marked by a record number of travelers and significant security enhancements. A total 813.8 million (813,791,287) passengers and crew members passed through TSA screening, with record-breaking screening numbers during the spring, Thanksgiving and summer travel periods. That’s over 2 million travelers a day and a 5.5 percent increase compared to 2017. These efforts are a testament to the coordination and collaboration between our industry partners and the hardworking men and women of TSA.

One of TSA’s significant accomplishments in 2018 was our work – in partnership with airports, airlines, and international partners – to complete the rollout of stronger carry-on screening procedures. Even more noteworthy was the signing of H.R. 302, FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018, which includes the TSA Modernization Act, that marked the first ever reauthorization of TSA since the agency’s founding in 2001. The reauthorization act empowers TSA to expand field operations and testing of advanced screening technologies, increase use of canine resources and enhance public area security. In addition, TSA released both its first ever Cybersecurity Roadmap that improves protections against cyberattacks on our transportation system and the Biometrics Roadmap, which will enable testing of new technology at airports. In coordination with our industry partners, we reached a significant milestone with the Known Crewmember® (KCM) program, clearing over 100 million crewmembers since its inception in 2011.

Throughout the year, TSA officers demonstrated great professionalism, dedication, integrity and remained committed to the mission to secure you – the traveling public. Thanks to their vigilance and skills, TSA officers intercepted a record number of firearms in 2018.

  • A record setting 4,239 total firearms were discovered in carry-on bags at checkpoints across the country, averaging 81.6 firearms per week. That’s an average of 11.6 firearms per day.
  • 3,656 (86.15 percent) of the total firearms discovered were loaded – another record.
  • 1,432 (33.74 percent) of the total firearms discovered had a round chambered.
  • The most firearms discovered in one month – a record setting 32 – were discovered in August at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport.
  • Firearms were intercepted at 249 of the 440 federalized airports.
  • That’s more than a 7 percent (282 more) increase in firearm discoveries from 2017’s total of 3,957.

2018 Year firearms infographic

Below are the top 10 airports that led in firearm discoveries in 2018:

  1. Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport (ATL): 298 – an increase of 53 compared to 2017 (253 loaded)
  2. Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (DFW): 219 (193 loaded)
  3. Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport (PHX): 129 (120 loaded)
  4. Denver International Airport (DEN): 126 (95 loaded)
  5. Orlando International Airport (MCO): 123 (112 loaded)
  6. George Bush Intercontinental Airport (IAH): 117 – a decrease of 25 firearms compared to 2017 (115 loaded)
  7. Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport (FLL): 96 (80 loaded)
  8. Austin-Bergstrom International Airport (AUS): 93 (76 loaded)
  9. Dallas Love Field Airport (DAL): 89 (83 loaded)
  10. Nashville International Airport (BNA): 86 (80 loaded)

Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. TSA may impose civil penalties of up to $13,333 per violation, per person for prohibited items violations and violations of other TSA regulations. Repeat violations will result in higher penalties. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure. Some airlines’ policies may differ from TSA’s. We strongly suggest travelers contact their airline for specific firearm and ammunition policies and check local laws related to the carrying and transport of firearms. If you plan to travel with your firearm, make sure you know the rules for packing it in your checked baggage.

Discovered firearms

Along with all the firearms we discovered, pictured above is a sample of some of the other prohibited items that we discovered this year.

Starting at the top left and moving clockwise:

  • Three smoke grenades were discovered in a checked bag at Nashville International Airport on Nov. 19.
  • An inert grenade was detected in a carry-on bag at McCarran International Airport on Nov. 27.
  • A bottle of lighter fluid was discovered in a carry-on bag of a passenger traveling from Seattle-Tacoma International Airport on Dec. 12.
  • Fireworks were discovered in the carry-on bag of a passenger traveling from Orlando International Airport on Dec. 13.
  • Five replica mortar shells were discovered in the checked bag of an Orlando International Airport passenger on Dec. 1. We had to stop baggage screening operations until an explosives specialist could respond and declare the items safe.

Anything resembling an explosive item is prohibited in carry-on and checked bags. If you are not sure if an item is allowed in your bag, check out our What Can I Bring tool, snap a photo and Tweet or Facebook Message us, call us at (866) 289-9673 or shoot us an email (pun intended).

Discovered Prohibited items

What’s worse than not knowing if an item is prohibited? Attempting to conceal a prohibited item can result in arrest and/or a civil penalty. Above are just a few prohibited items discovered that were suspiciously packaged.

Starting at the top left and moving clockwise:

  • This bag looked suspicious to our Minneapolis-Saint Paul International Airport X-ray operator. During a bag check, scissors and a knife were found wrapped in tin foil behind the bag’s lining. Scissors with blades shorter than 4 inches, measured from the tip to the pivot point, are allowed in carry-on bags. Knives of any size and scissors with blades longer than 4 inches should be packed in your checked baggage.
  • The knife comb was discovered at Wichita Dwight D. Eisenhower National Airport on Nov. 21.
  • This knife, concealed inside a medicine bottle, was discovered at Springfield-Branson National Airport on Nov. 26.
  • A carbon dioxide powered semi-automatic pellet gun was discovered in a carry-on bag at Manchester-Boston Regional Airport on Dec. 6. The passenger had the firearm tucked into a static shielding bag as pictured on the bottom left. Airsoft guns, pellet guns and bb guns are prohibited in carry-on baggage.

TSA screening procedures prevent prohibited items and other threats to transportation security from entering the sterile area of the airport. The items highlighted above are just a small selection of what we find every day. Let this be a reminder to double check your belongings before going through security.

FingerWant to know how many firearms we found in 2017? Check out our blog post.

And don’t forget to check out our top 10 most unusual finds videos for 2016 and 2017. Stay tuned for 2018’s unusual finds.

Sadly, we also had to say goodbye this year to our beloved friend, colleague and a 'dad humor' specialist, Curtis “Blogger Bob” Burns. Bob was the original author of this blog series and was instrumental in TSA winning three Webby Awards. He is regarded as a pioneer influencer in government agencies adopting social media to engage the public and was greatly admired for his witty humor. We miss him deeply.

Lastly, at airports across the nation, TSA employees were overwhelmed by the generous support shown to them during the recent lapse in federal funding. We are grateful and thankful for the public support from industry, travelers, local businesses and communities, including those who provided hot meals, groceries, household goods and infant-care items to TSA employees. To them and you, we say THANK YOU!

With 2019 underway, the TSA men and women across the nation remain committed to securing transportation and serving you – the traveling public – to ensure that all travelers, here and abroad, get to their destinations safely.  

Jay Wagner

TSA Blog Team

Comments

Submitted by Roy Williams on

Bob Burns leaves immense shoes to fill--I suspect he received many mean-spirited, thoughtless comments about the TSA (and probably some about him personally).

Despite that, he was always informed, thoughtful, pleasant and responsive. He knew the business and the mission. We will all miss him.

Submitted by Eyeroll on

Meanwhile, how many people suffered needless, invasive, and abusive physical searches thanks to false alarms on your vaunted body scanners?

Why do you continue to use a technology with a false positive rate of 100%, when faster, less invasive, more accurate technology (WTMDs) is available?

What's the difference between your standard patdown protocol and a sexual assault? Is there any line between the two?

Submitted by John B on

Listed is the number of firearms "Discovered". What is the number of firearms confiscated 2018? What is the number of individuals charged with a crime for attempting to transport firearms in their carry on or through security in 2018? I was authorized to carry an AR-15 through air port security when I deployed to Iraq in 2008. This weapon along with all the other weapons being carried by the troops in my unit were easily "discovered", but they were authorized. I am sure there are many FBI, and law enforcement officers that are authorized to carry loaded firearms though security, that should be discovered when going though check points.

Submitted by No Eyeroll on

EyeRoll sounds like you have a personal bias. Don't let hate blind you my friend.

Submitted by West Cooper on

John B Sez - "What is the number of firearms confiscated 2018?"

By TSA? None. When a firearm is discovered, we contact the LEOs and they assume control of the firearm. The disposition of the discovered firearm, and any charges that are applied will be done by them. We appreciate your service, we have (by the last published info I had) roughly 1/4 of our workforce is former or currently serving in the military.

TSA Blog Team

Submitted by Mark on

Can you name a metallic explosive that will be detected by a WTMD?

Submitted by J H on

No one is perfect. BUT, anyone who "forgot" their firearm (loaded or not) was here, there or in their "BAG" should NOT own a gun. It is the owners DUTY to know where their tool (and related hardware) is at ALL times. Responsibility is "properly" ck'ing ones equipment. Someone could steel the bag and now we have a loose (stolen) tool. That may / or not be loaded.

Submitted by SSSS For Some Reason on

So you had a five percent increase in travellers for the year. Did all the stuff you find equal a larger or smaller increase than the five percent? Did you find five percent more firearms? Or less than five percent more?

Submitted by Concerned Citizen on

TSA's mission is to protect the nations transportation system aka: keep bombs off planes.
A WTMD is non invasive however fails to detect explosive, etc... This is where the "body scanner" comes in handy.
TSA has kept remarkable amounts of firearms out of accessible property.
A standard patdown doesn't elicit sexual emotions from the officer performing their duties per SOP. To call it sexual assault is insulting to the officer doing their thankless job of protecting the traveling public.

Submitted by TSAGuardian on

the Advanced Imaging Technology (AIT) cannot produce a false-positive. They do have some issues, but your beloved WTMD are useless against non-metallic weapons and explosives which is why the AITs came to be. composite knives and the so-called Underwear Bomber used an all non-metallic explosive system which is how he got through the WTMD and onto an aircraft. As for your complaint about sexual assault; TSA is empowered by the Administrative Search Authority give by Congress and affirmed by the Supreme Court. So the difference is simple: TSA is given the authority by the elected officials of the USA and the Supreme Court. If you don't like it reconsider who you are voting for.

Submitted by Gam2042 on

You have no idea what your talking about LOL!!

Submitted by Gam2042 on

And they are, a good portion of guns caught are from law enforcement that didn't know that they had them on them, in another words profesinals that are careless with their weapons

Submitted by Gam2042 on

And they are, a good portion of guns caught are from law enforcement that didn't know that they had them on them, in another words profesinals that are careless with their weapons

Submitted by Bill on

Are you and idiot I mean really?

Submitted by Bill on

No fire arms are permitted through the checkpoints, LEOs use specific entrances and do not get their baggage screened if they are traveling armed.

Submitted by The Original "RB" on

OK, 2018 is just history now. I asked a question which has gone unanswered if there were going to be any post for 2019 finds. Is into February and still no 2019 postings. Has the blog changed direction or something?

Also, what happened to the Meet Our Bloggers side bar? It's nice having an idea of who is representing TSA.

Submitted by Garcia on

The WTMD can not detect non metal items, such as carbon fiber knives, paper detonators or explosives. Have you heard about the underwear bomber? he could have easily gone through the WTMD without an alarm.
--
Yes, one is needed to make sure you don't carry a concealed prohibited item on you. The other one is sexual assault, I hope you understand. The sensitive pat downs might be a bit invasive I can relate, but it is safest, fastest alternative we have NOW to make sure you make it safe to your destination.

Submitted by ShouldahadaV-8 on

wow, "needless, invasive, and abusive"? the need is there because the body scanner alarmed for some reason. of course it couldn't have been because many people don't actually listen to the officers as they tell you to EMPTY your pockets. too many people don't think that certain things qualify as a "something". you can see all the time that someone will leave their wallet, a comb, tissues, cash, passports, or any number of things in their pockets even though they were asked repeatedly to take everything out, and lets not even start in about those that leave their belts on despite being warned it may cause a patdown too. also, a 100% false alarm rate? are you serious? what's your source for that, or do you even have one? you go as far as to claim the WTMD technology is more accurate, but do you even know the difference in what each machine is searching for? try the TSA website for some information before you try to compare them, or try asking the people who are keeping you, your loved ones, and everybody else safe despite the hecklers like you. as far as the difference between sexual assault and the standard patdown protocol, the difference is that sexual assault happens without your consent. guess what though, that patdown... everyone that gets one consented to it. next time you buy an airline ticket, read everything. there's a part that tells you will have to go through TSA screening procedures, which may just include a patdown. when you are in the airport heading to your gate, you pass by several signs that tell you that you will be screened if you pass that point. Also, the checkpoints are stationary, you came to them willingly. they didn't approach you and make demands, you imply consent to the search by going up to them. their authority is based on acts of congress, our representatives that people like you and me vote into office. the officers you get screened by do not make the policies and procedures, they uphold them and perform THEIR JOBS. instead of attacking and making baseless (much less false) accusations about the TSA, why not be thankful that they are doing their jobs, protecting us, and are very dedicated to their mission. these men and women even did all of this while their paychecks were on hold, that should speak volumes.

Submitted by Susan Richart on

"As for your complaint about sexual assault; TSA is empowered by the Administrative Search Authority give by Congress and affirmed by the Supreme Court. So the difference is simple: TSA is given the authority by the elected officials of the USA and the Supreme Court. If you don't like it reconsider who you are voting for."

The Supreme Court has never handed down an opinion affirming the right of the TSA to search people in the manner that, under any other circumstance, would be sexual assault.

Submitted by Susan Richart on

"the need is there because the body scanner alarmed for some reason."

How often does the body scanner alarm and there is NOTHING that triggered said alarm? Close to 50% of alarms are false, nothing is found when the passenger is groped. For some strange reason, it appears that most of the alarms are in the crotch area? I believe the scanners are set to alarm in the crotch area to give screeners an excuse to get their hands into passengers' genitals because TSA is certain they will find someone trying to smuggle a "dangerous item" in that area of the body.

"They say that 9/11 was caused partly by a lack of imagination on our part; this is why TSA focuses on so many ludicrous theoretical threats like liquid explosives, sheet explosives, underwear bombs, lightsabers, and purses with embossed guns, because they are letting their imagination run wild with them, trying to imagine and interdict any and all theoretical and potential threats."

https://www.flyertalk.com/forum/30760759-post52.html

Submitted by Whew! on

People who routinely commit sexual assault sure do get huffy whenever someone points out that they routinely commit sexual assault.

Submitted by The Alarms Are ... on

"the need is there because the body scanner alarmed for some reason."

Right - the naked body scanners are a flawed technology that routinely alarms on harmless things like sweat and pleats and plackets on clothing, or on nothing at all, and the result of these false alarms is that people have to undergo an invasive pat down that's indistinguishable from sexual assault. (We know it's indistinguishable because West Cooper and Jay Wagner, dishonest cowards, freak out any time someone asks them the difference between a TSA patdown and sexual assault.) Meanwhile, in over a decade of use, the naked body scanners have never found a single dangerous item that a WTMD wouldn't have found. As for the patdowns TSA desperately wishes weren't a form of sexual assault, well, a FOIA request in one airport found that for all of your groping, rubbing, and assaulting, the sum total of items found was one (1) pocketknife.

If that makes you feel safer, you're a pathetic coward, and you probably put on a blue uniform and sexually assault people every day.

Submitted by Yep, 100% on

"also, a 100% false alarm rate? are you serious?"

Yep. Just look at this blog - over the decade or so TSA has been using these naked body scanners and sexually assaulting people for false alarms on them, there's never been a single dangerous item found that a WTMD wouldn't have found.

If that upsets you, maybe find a line of work that doesn't involve sexually assaulting people?

Submitted by Jared Hawke on

To Mr. Yep, 100%.
You stated that "there's never been a single dangerous item found that a WTMD wouldn't have found."
you are 100% wrong. Before you spout information on this site, do some research.

Submitted by Rolleye on

The way you have couched your question reveals a great deal of ignorance. WTMDs are designed to detect only one thing - metal. The AIT - "body scanner" - detects more than just metal, making it the faster, less invasive, and more accurate technology than WTMD, not the reverse as you argue. How about this: TSA can make screening optional and then we'll see who is willing to actually fly. Probably you'll be among the first to howl about the failure of the agency when a terrorist has a successful attack.

Submitted by Your Answer on

Read through the blog's infographics and you'll see it mention a 7% increase in firearms discovered - greater than the 5% increase in passenger traffic.

Submitted by Get Some Education on

TSA does not use "naked body scanners." The advanced imaging technology presents an image of a cartoon-like amorphous character and displays areas with suspect items by a colored box on the image. Indeed there was a time when the fully body scanners presented an actual x-ray type image, but that has not been used for around 9-10 years.

Submitted by West Cooper on

The alarms sez - "

We know it's indistinguishable because West Cooper and Jay Wagner, dishonest cowards, freak out any time someone asks them the difference between a TSA patdown and sexual assault. Meanwhile, in over a decade of use, the naked body scanners have never found a single dangerous item that a WTMD wouldn't have found."

Now, now, I am saddened to see you resorting to personal insults instead of presenting facts – You skipped over the beginning part of debates and jumped right to the dirty tricks pile.

Just a couple of facts for you to peruse:

1. I have not freaked out since this was en vogue (I can't speak for Jay, I am pretty sure he is younger, so it may be possible he heard it in a club of late)

2. Your statement that we have never found anything that would not have alarmed the WTMD is a complete fabrication.

Even as far back as 2010 we were publishing accounts of ceramic knives, as well as other weapons and items. I personally have relayed stories of items I have seen discovered by the AIT that would not have alarmed the WTMD (most of them ceramic knives, and items like kubatons, tactical spikes and even a tactical pen).

TSA Blog Team

Submitted by Wendy on

To Susan Richard

Ma'am you seem very interested in TSA why don't you work for them? So perhaps you can learn something and then make informed comments.

Submitted by Whew? on

Whew!-
"People who routinely commit sexual assault sure do get huffy whenever someone points out that they routinely commit sexual assault."

People who routinely spout falsehoods and display ignorance border lining on willful stupidity sure do get huffy whenever someone points out that they routinely spout falsehoods and display ignorance border lining on willful stupidity.

;D

Submitted by SSSS For Some Reason on

"... WTMD are useless against non-metallic weapons and explosives "

Which the big expensive scanners haven't found either.

The 'Shoe-Bomber' (whose device wouldn't have done anything to the plane, by the way) wouldn't have been stopped by the Nudie-Scanners.

The 'Underwear-Bomber' might have been stopped by the Nudie-Scanners, but that has more to do with the bombers incompetence than the scanners and their screeners.

Submitted by Anonymous on

honestly your dumb

Submitted by West Cooper on

Anon sez - "honestly your dumb"

"You're"

TSA Blog Team

Submitted by The Canadian on

If you don't understand the difference, your IQ is too low to be navigating cross-country travel anyway.
Keep up the good work TSA!

Submitted by Jared Hawke on

To: SSSS and Susan Richart, you both have claimed that the Body Scanned has not ever caught anything dangerous that the Walk Through Meatal Detector couldn’t catch.

Your claims are flat out wrong. There have been many items that have been discovered by the Body Scanner that would have not been found by the Walk Through Meatal Detector.

You need to STOP spreading “FAKE NEWS” to get your point across. I totally understand that you hate TSA with all your being, and you have set it to be your mission to destroy TSA. You need to STOP!!!

Submitted by Susan Richart on

Wendy wrote: "Ma'am you seem very interested in TSA why don't you work for them? So perhaps you can learn something and then make informed comments."

I have way too much self respect to work for any organization that molests people and fails testing 80% of the time.

Submitted by PoliticalCalcs on

I wonder if you could help reconcile a discrepancy in some previously reported data for the number of firearms intercepted at airport security checkpoints from 2005 and 2009. Here's the source for the originally reported data, which indicates the number of firearms intercepted in these years was 2,217 (for 2005), 2,075 (2006), 1,416 (2007), 902 (2008), and 889 (2009):

https://www.bts.gov/archive/publications/national_transportation_statist...

Here's the source for the revised data, which matches what you've presented in this year's updated chart, with 660 (in 2005), 821 (2006), 803 (2007), 926 (2008), and 976 (2009):

https://www.bts.gov/content/prohibited-items-intercepted-airport-screeni...

Here are the questions I'm looking to answer:

1. When was the data revised?
2. Why was it revised? (And why so substantially for 2005 through 2007 in particular?)

Thank you for your time in answering these questions!

Submitted by Susan Richart on

A Concerned Citizen wrote, in part: "A standard patdown doesn't elicit sexual emotions from the officer performing their duties per SOP. To call it sexual assault is insulting to the officer doing their thankless job of protecting the traveling public."

I responded by asking Concerned Citizen how he knew that doing a patdown doesn't "elicit sexual emotion form the screener (they are "officers" only in the eyes of the TSA) doing their (should have been "his/her") thankless job of protecting the traveling public. I added a quote from a male who was in fact sexually assaulted by a male at a TSA checkpoint who said that the assaulter was absolutely enjoying what he was doing.

Why wasn't my comment approved, Jay and/or West?

screen shot/DHS IG statement

Submitted by Susan Richart on

Jared Hawke wrote: "There have been many items that have been discovered by the Body Scanner that would have not been found by the Walk Through Meatal Detector." Name them for us, please, Jared. Name the things that would present a danger to an aircraft or the passengers on that aircraft.

And no, I will NOT stop with my criticism of an agency that wastes $8 billion dollars a year of taxpayer money.

screen shot

Submitted by SSSS For Some Reason on

"..Submitted by The Canadian on Wed, 2019-02-13 13:56
If you don't understand the difference, your IQ is too low to be navigating cross-country travel anyway.
Keep up the good work TSA!"

Again. Still. Posts that are supportive of the TSA remain even when they are clear violations of the posting rules.

If we can't trust the TSA to follow even this simple rule why would we ever trust them with something important like securing the skies?

Submitted by SSSS For Some Reason on

"...ubmitted by Jared Hawke on Wed, 2019-02-13 17:47
Your claims are flat out wrong. There have been many items that have been discovered by the Body Scanner that would have not been found by the Walk Through Meatal Detector."

You hit enter too soon. Your list of things found got cut off.

Submitted by West Cooper on

Susan sez - "Name the things that would present a danger to an aircraft or the passengers on that aircraft."

1. Explosives

2. Ceramic knives

3. Tactical Spikes

4. Tactical Pens

5. Kubatons

The striking items are not likely to generate a situation where a catastrophic failure of the aircraft happens, but it can create a catastrophic injury for an individual.

TSA Blog Team

Submitted by Susan Richart on

West wrote: "Susan sez - "Name the things that would present a danger to an aircraft or the passengers on that aircraft."

You took that statement out of context, West. I was questioning Jared Hawke when he wrote: "There have been many items that have been discovered by the Body Scanner that would have not been found by the Walk Through Meatal Detector."

Submitted by SSSS For Some Reason on

"...but it can create a catastrophic injury for an individual."

While I certainly don't want to be the one who gets hit, the items you listed are not threats to aviation, not even a little bit. The passengers and crew far outnumber the one person with the tatical spike. That person is going to get smeared so deep into the carpet it's going to take one of those industrial grade vacuums to get the stain out.

Submitted by Ron Miron on

My 17 Year Old Son has Asperger Syndrome, this puts him in the Autism Spectrum Disorder category, he suffer from Extreme Social Anxiety and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder that causes him to have to wash and clean his hands, arms and face. He traveled with his mother from the Miami Airport and the security line was overwhelming for someone like him. We identified this to the TSA agents and they did everything they could to make it comfortable and easy for him, it was the difference between a bad experience and a pleasant one. Thank you to the agents that were so understanding and helpful!

Submitted by Sigh on

West, are you going to provide a link to the blotter entry where you allege the naked body scanners found "explosives"? No? I didn't think so.

And did any of these "big finds" lead to arrests or prosecutions or convictions for terrorism or anything else? Oh, right, that's more information you don't track, because it would show how empty all of these "big finds" are.

You've got such a vanishingly small number of "big finds" to tout that you're essentially saying the false positive rate isn't 100% because it's really 99.99999999999999%. It's pathetic, like your agency.

Submitted by Nocaps on

Submitted by Susan Richart on Thu, 2019-02-14 13:08

Jared Hawke wrote: "There have been many items that have been discovered by the Body Scanner that would have not been found by the Walk Through Meatal Detector." Name them for us, please, Jared. Name the things that would present a danger to an aircraft or the passengers on that aircraft.

And no, I will NOT stop with my criticism of an agency that wastes $8 billion dollars a year of taxpayer money.

screen shot

you say $8 billion like it's a lot of money. how large is the deficit of the us government? how does this $8 billion compare to other government agencies? does the tsa create revenue that could be used to pay for it's own budget? is there anything in the us news that compares to this $8 billion being "wasted"?

Submitted by TSA Guardian on

TSA screeners are not law enforcement. When firearms are found, the weapons and passenger(s) involved are given to the local law enforcement agency tasked with that airport (typically a county sheriff, city police department, or the Airport Police Department where applicable). It is up to the local LEOs to what to do with the passenger and firearm based on applicable federal, state, and local laws. Back in 2008, troops could carry weapons through. It was later determined that such a protocol wasn't prudent anymore and rescinded. On-duty law enforcement flying armed go through the Exit and must provide proof of identity, declared carrying of a weapon to their airline, or they put it in their checked bag.

Submitted by TSA Guardian on

I would like to present two FACTS to all commenters.
Number of SUCCESSFUL hijackings and/or terrorist attacks on aircraft departing a US Airport before TSA's creation: 69
Number of SUCCESSFUL hijackings and/or terrorist attacks on aircraft departing a US airport after TSA's creation: 0
Why? When weaknesses were found, TSA made changes in a concerted effort to neutralize the weakness. Richard Reid's shoe bomb is why you have to remove shoes. The Underwear Bomber is why the (now-gone) back-scatter x-ray scanners were used and now the AITs.

Whether you like TSA or not, the FACTS prove they're doing something right.

Submitted by SSSS For Some Reason on

"...you say $8 billion like it's a lot of money."

I'm impressed with your net worth that you think 8 billion to not be a lot of money.

"... how large is the deficit of the us government? "

I know a way to reduce that deficit by about 7 billion dollars.

"...how does this $8 billion compare to other government agencies? "

Relevancy please?

"...does the tsa create revenue that could be used to pay for it's own budget?"

They charge you $12.50 per leg of your trip. That means the TSA generated roughly 75 million in fees for the month of January. That looks like about 9 ish percent of their operating budget.

"... is there anything in the us news that compares to this $8 billion being "wasted"?"

So you're saying that since there is government waste in other parts of the government we shouldn't try and address the waste that is the TSA?

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