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Transportation Security Administration

Customer Service

How can we help you? There are a few options available to contact us.


Top Frequently Asked Questions

Am I allowed to carry my CPAP machine onboard the plane, do I have to remove it from my carry-on?

A nebulizer, CPAP, BiPAP and APAP must be removed from its carrying case and undergo X-ray screening. Facemasks and tubing may remain in the case. You may provide a clear plastic bag to place the device through the X-ray.

I am traveling with medication, are there any requirements I should be aware of?

All passenger items must undergo security screening. It is recommended that medication be clearly labeled to facilitate the screening process.

You may bring medically necessary liquids, medications and creams in excess of 3.4 ounces or 100 milliliters in your carry-on bag. Remove them from your carry-on bag to be screened separately from the rest of your belongings.

I have a service animal, what type of screening should I expect?

You and your service dog/animal will be screened by a walk-through metal detector. You may walk through together or you may lead the animal through separately on a leash. You will undergo a pat-down if you are not screened by the walk-through metal detector.

If the metal detector alarms, you and your service dog/animal will undergo additional screening, including a pat-down.

I need special assistance during screening, whom can I contact before arriving to the airport?

TSA Cares is a helpline that provides travelers with disabilities, medical conditions and other special circumstances additional assistance during the security screening process.

Contact us 72 hours prior to traveling with questions about screening policies, procedures and what to expect at the security checkpoint. You may call (855) 787-2227 or email TSA Cares.

What are the procedures if I have an internal or external medical device, such as a pacemaker or metal implant?

Advanced imaging technology can facilitate your screening and reduces the likelihood of a pat-down. Inform the TSA officer that you have an artificial knee, hip, other metal implant or a pacemaker, defibrillator or other internal medical device. You should not be screened by a walk-through metal detector if you have an internal medical device such as a pacemaker. Consult with your physician prior to flying.

If you choose to not be screened through the advanced imaging technology or you alarm the walk-through metal detector, you will undergo a pat-down screening.