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Transportation Security Administration

TSA Week in Review: March 19th - 25th

Tuesday, March 27, 2018
TSA discovered 79 firearms in carry-on bags around the nation last week. Of the 79 firearms discovered, 71 were loaded and 24 had a round chambered.

TSA discovered 79 firearms in carry-on bags around the nation last week. Of the 79 firearms discovered, 71 were loaded and 24 had a round chambered. Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. TSA may impose civil penalties of up to $13,066 per violation per person for prohibited items violations and violations of other TSA regulations. Repeat violations will result in higher penalties. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure. You can go here for more details on how to properly travel with your firearms in checked baggage. All of the firearms pictured were discovered over the last week. See complete lists below.

The ammunition pictured here was packed in a carry-on bag at the Chicago O’Hare International Airport (ORD).

If packed properly, ammunition can be transported in checked-baggage. The ammunition pictured here was packed in a carry-on bag at the Chicago O’Hare International Airport (ORD). You can go here for more details on how to properly travel with ammunition in checked baggage.

The inert grenade pictured above was discovered in a checked bag at the Denver International Airport (DEN).

We don’t know if replica or inert items are live until our explosives professionals take a closer look and eventually open the bag. That takes time and slows down the line. It can even lead to a complete shutdown and evacuation. Real, inert, or anything resembling an explosive item is prohibited in both carry-on and checked baggage. The inert grenade pictured above was discovered in a checked bag at the Denver International Airport (DEN).

From left to right, these prohibited items were discovered in carry-on bags at BDL, BNA, BOI, BUF, DEN, IAH, LAS, PVD, PVD and SJC.

From left to right, these prohibited items were discovered in carry-on bags at BDL, BNA, BOI, BUF, DEN, IAH, LAS, PVD, PVD and SJC. While these items are prohibited in carry-on bags, they may be packed in checked baggage. However, familiarize yourself with local laws as concealed weapons and martial arts weapons are illegal in parts of the U.S.

TSA discovered 79 firearms in carry-on bags around the nation last week. Of the 79 firearms discovered, 71 were loaded and 24 had a round chambered. Checkpoint and checked baggage screening acts as a deterrent to keep those with ill will from attempting to cause catastrophic damage to an aircraft. In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly in carry-on bags, our officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons, stun guns, small pocket knives and many other prohibited items too numerous to note.

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions; that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items.

If you haven’t read them yet, make sure you check out our year in review posts for 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016 and 2017.

And don’t forget to check out our top 10 most unusual finds videos for 2016 & 2017.

Follow @TSA on Twitter and Instagram and Like Us on Facebook. Have a question? Ask TSA on Twitter or Facebook Messenger

Bob Burns

TSA Social Media

Comments

Submitted by Tom on

There are many who appreciate what you do.Keep up the good work.

Submitted by Ic on

As always, absolutely nothing you needed your slow, invasive, and ineffective naked body scanners to detect. Meanwhile, how many people suffered physical searches thanks to false alarms on these useless machines?

Why are Curtis Burns and West Cooper unwilling to address, let alone answer, that question?

How many weeks has it been since you last trumpeted something dangerous you found with the naked body scanners?

Submitted by Cindy M on

More food for thought: What's hiding in my bra, my underpants, and now my granola bars? Looks like TSA is determined to find out. Is it really effective detection if the equipment alerts on moisturizers, sunscreens, and snack food? Notice the article mentions outrage building over x-rated patdowns. There's something happening here...

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/tripping/wp/2018/03/29/your-sugar-bo...

Submitted by RB on

Bobbie, you too important to post comments these days?

Submitted by Cindy M on

This is my favorite critique of the patdown policy. A child's asthma medication was left in a carry on bag so SOMEONE has to pay by submitting to a thorough feeling up and groping down.

"The TSO explained that since the nebulizer was in the bag but should have been placed separately in a bin, a complete pat-down was now required. I objected to this and asked that a supervisor be summoned. The supervisor arrived and stated that only a mandatory pat-down of someone would resolve this situation, and that this was required by “procedure.” Rather than miss my flight and traumatize my children, I subjected myself to a pat-down, despite the fact that I had not even packed the bag."

http://observer.com/2015/02/the-tsa-has-fallen-so-far-it-represents-a-th...

Submitted by Marr on

Who cares what make/type ogf guns you found? How many bombs did you find strapped to a wheelchair, toddler of elderly traveller? I've spent quite a while looking for specific info re scanning someone who can't raise their arms about waist height on this site, and it is not there - you'd rather make useless lists of guns. Get your priorities right!

Submitted by Leonard Schwartz on

How many of those people were fined and or arrested?

Submitted by Leonard Schwartz on

How many of those people were fined and or arrested?

Submitted by SSSS For Some Reason on

"...The inert grenade pictured above was discovered in a checked bag at the Denver International Airport (DEN)."

And once it was determined to be inert was in returned to the bag it was found in allowed to fly? If not, why not?

Submitted by RB on

Thank you TSA

Submitted by Eric D on

Having worked at TSA for over 13 years, the adage is proven true again: a few negligent people make it difficult for the rest of us. I still answer critics of the TSA with the statement, "I would rather have to apologize to 100 passengers who expressed frustration to the inconvenience of being searched than have to call on one person with the news, 'your relative ws killed on an airplane because I did not do my job!'"

Submitted by CliffOnTheRoad on

logical question BUT because in a carry-on, the owner might pull it out again inside the terminal to show a friend, people would see it, panic, trample children to death trying to run away, and close the terminal. If the idiot pulled it out inside the airplane, other passengers would reach under their seat for the parachute and open the doors to escape.

Yet if in checked bags, and the TSA discovered someone got thru their line without being screened, the TSA does their standard (but not logical) inspection of all passengers upon exiting at the destination airport as well as (I guess) re x-ray all the luggage which might close THAT airport until it was determined to be an inert hand grandanade (sp)

The only alternative on checked objects is to declare it at the airline counter just like a gun.

Submitted by Hermann Fegelein on

Eric D, it's certainly true that a few negligent people make it difficult for the rest of us, so I don't understand why you haven't been fired. Your focus on water, brownies, cupcakes, and peanut butter, as well as failing to learn and follow the rules in general, is what causes 95% of actual dangerous items to make it through the checkpoint smoothly and easily. If there were a real threat, we would lose an airplane a day because the TSA contributes nothing to aviation safety. We don't object to screening; we object to pointless screening, and even that would be less of a hardship if the clerks cared more about following the rules rather than asserting their toy-badge authority and retaliating against passengers.

Submitted by RB on

Submitted by Eric D on Sun, 2018-04-01 21:16
Having worked at TSA for over 13 years, the adage is proven true again: a few negligent people make it difficult for the rest of us. I still answer critics of the TSA with the statement, "I would rather have to apologize to 100 passengers who expressed frustration to the inconvenience of being searched than have to call on one person with the news, 'your relative ws killed on an airplane because I did not do my job!'"
..........................................................................

13 years, wow! I'm sorry you couldn't find a real job. And I agree that TSA that makes travel difficult for the rest of us. Policies that have absolutely no basis in security, machines that don't detect just threat items, screeners who get a kick out of groping genitals or making people miss flights in a show of power.

If we are looking for terrorists we have to look no further than TSA to find them!

Submitted by John on

Good job Eric. RB is just upset TSA rejected his application.

Submitted by The Original RB on

Submitted by RB on Tue, 2018-04-03 07:39
Outstanding professionalism TSA,

http://abc11.com/family/woman-praises-tsa-for-helping-son-with-autism-on...

...........................................

"Even a blind squirrel finds an acorn every once in a while"

Even I admit that out of ~60,000 employees TSA might have a handful of kind, caring, and honest people. It's the other ~59,995 employees causing the problems.

Submitted by RB on

Submitted by John on Wed, 2018-04-04 05:56
Good job Eric. RB is just upset TSA rejected his application.
.............
I'll state this once again for those new to this blog or for those who just can't read.

I have never applied for employment at TSA or any other company offering security/screening services to the transportation sector.

I have more self respect for myself and wouldn't stoop that low.

Submitted by SSSS For Some Reason on

"..If the idiot pulled it out inside the airplane, other passengers would reach under their seat for the parachute and open the doors to escape."

So you are saying the flying public doesn't trust the TSA to do their job in screening items. If it is on the aircraft then TSA should have screened it and determined it was not dangerous. If people are panicking because they saw someone holding a grenade then those same people don't trust the TSA to have done their job.

Put another way... you might want to rethink your argument because your argument makes the TSA look just as bad as they do now by making a big deal about finding things that aren't dangerous and making the finding of it to be a big deal.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Just so you know the "Naked Body Scanners" actually dont show the person's body. It shows a diagram of a human figure thats the same for every person. When an alarm goes off it just puts a red blob on the area of the diagram. This does not show any private areas or sensitive areas of a person. The now when it comes to radiation your cell phone puts off more radiation than the techonology does. If you need futher information im sure you can contact them at their contact center they have and they would be happy to tell you all the answers you want. Since you like to post on every blogg