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TSA Week In Review - May 14th - 20th: 101 Firearms Discovered in Carry-on Bags

Friday, June 01, 2018
TSA discovered 101 firearms in carry-on bags around the nation last week. Of the 101 firearms discovered, 85 were loaded and 28 had a round chambered.

TSA discovered 101 firearms in carry-on bags around the nation last week. Of the 101 firearms discovered, 85 were loaded and 28 had a round chambered. Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. TSA may impose civil penalties of up to $13,066 per violation per person for prohibited items violations and violations of other TSA regulations. Repeat violations will result in higher penalties. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure. You can go here for more details on how to properly travel with your firearms in checked baggage.  Some airlines policies may differ from TSA’s. We strongly suggest travelers contact their airline for specific firearm and ammunition policies and to check local laws related to the carrying and transport of firearms. All of the firearms pictured were discovered over the last week. See complete lists below.

 

Clockwise from the top, these prohibited items were discovered in carry-on bags at BWI, IAH, ANC, DAY, HOU, ANC, SBP, DEN, ABQ, AMA, CLE, DEN, and DAL.

 

Clockwise from the top, these prohibited items were discovered in carry-on bags at BWI, IAH, ANC, DAY, HOU, ANC, SBP, DEN, ABQ, AMA, CLE, DEN, and DAL. While these items are prohibited in carry-on bags, they may be packed in checked baggage. However, familiarize yourself with local laws as concealed weapons and martial arts weapons are illegal in parts of the U.S.

 

TSA discovered 101 firearms in carry-on bags around the nation last week. Of the 101 firearms discovered, 85 were loaded and 28 had a round chambered. Checkpoint and checked baggage screening acts as a deterrent to keep those with ill will from attempting to cause catastrophic damage to an aircraft. In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly in carry-on bags, our officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons, stun guns, small pocket knives and many other prohibited items too numerous to note.

 

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions; that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items.

If you haven’t read them yet, make sure you check out our year in review posts for 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016 and 2017.

 

And don’t forget to check out our top 10 most unusual finds videos for 2016 & 2017.

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Bob Burns

TSA Social Media

Comments

Submitted by Dr WILLIAM RIC... on

The numbers increase. Apparently no one is aware of the rules. This is really shocking.

Submitted by Anonymous on

DAH what are people thinking trying to carryon a weapon.

Submitted by Qk on

As always, absolutely nothing you needed your slow, invasive, and ineffective naked body scanners to detect. Meanwhile, how many people suffered physical searches thanks to false alarms on these useless machines?

Why are Curtis Burns and West Cooper unwilling to address, let alone answer, that question?

How many weeks has it been since you last trumpeted something dangerous you found with the naked body scanners?

Submitted by Patdown Or Assault? on

How is a passenger to determine whether a pat-down by TSA crosses the line into sexual assault?

Does any such line exist?

What should a passenger who is being sexually assaulted during a pat-down do?

Submitted by Jhon on

They seem to never learn. Fines are either to low or not enforced hard enought. You neve "forget" were your gun is, and if you do so wtf are you doing carrying a gun around?

Submitted by Ayn R Key on

Hello blog team.

When the TSA imposes a fine, said fine must accord with the Administrative Procedures Act. Can you explain how your agency verified their fines to be in accord with that legislation?

Submitted by Anonymous on

Dr WILLIAM RIC wrote "The numbers increase. Apparently no one is aware of the rules. This is really shocking."

Some of us doubt these claims by the TSA. I would question it, but there are other questions I wish to get answered if only the comment with the question could get approved.

Submitted by SSSS For Some Reason on

"The numbers increase. ...This is really shocking."

Not really.

The TSA's very own internal testing shows that as many as nine out of ten things get missed in the screening process. So the fact that they found less than a hundred firearms, and less than a hundred more whatever's are being shouted about this week, just goes to prove how few terrorists there really are out there since as many as a thousand more firearms made it onto the aircraft and still not one incident in the air last week. Or last month. Or even last year.

Submitted by West Cooper on

Ayn sez - "When the TSA imposes a fine, said fine must accord with the Administrative Procedures Act. Can you explain how your agency verified their fines to be in accord with that legislation?"

Howdy Ayn, nice to see you back!

I have no specific information on compliance/non-compliance with the Administrative Procedures Act. The only information that I have access to is the published enforcement sanctions at the TSA website. You may visit it here.

You may also visit the Civil Enforcement page at TSA, for a broader view of how the fines work, what they may be assessed for and the program in general.

If you are unable to find what you are looking for there, the following is listed as one of the FAQs there -

"I have additional questions that were not addressed here regarding the notice of violation I received. Can I talk to someone?

You may contact the Special Enforcement Program Office at (571) 227-3994. Be prepared to leave a message providing your name, phone number, the case number and correct spelling of the individual who is listed on the notice of violation, and your case agent’s name. Your message will be directed to your case agent for a return call. It is the goal of TSA to return all calls within 72 hours; however, in the event of a delay, the date of your message will be taken into consideration."

I hope this information helps you find what you are looking for.

TSA Blog Team

Submitted by Ayn R Key on

Actually it just gives the fee schedule based on various categories. I think my question is one that you, the blog team, need to refer to the TSA lawyers. They are probably the ones best able to give me the answer of how the fee schedule complies with the APA.

Submitted by West Cooper on

Ayn sez - "Actually it just gives the fee schedule based on various categories. I think my question is one that you, the blog team, need to refer to the TSA lawyers. They are probably the ones best able to give me the answer of how the fee schedule complies with the APA."

I have forwarded your comment up the chain. If I had more information specific to the question you have asked, I would be more than happy to post it. In this case, I have no other information available to give you.

TSA Blog Team

Submitted by Cindy M on

Patdown or Assault says "How is a passenger to determine whether a pat-down by TSA crosses the line into sexual assault?

Does any such line exist?

What should a passenger who is being sexually assaulted during a pat-down do?"

Repeated questions about this subject are ignored by Mr Cooper and Mr Burns. Questions and comments that name the areas of the body TSA touches all day everyday are censored. What is the cost benefit ratio of herding people through poorly designed scanners that alert on pleats, pockets, and sequins and then devoting countless man hours to stroking passengers' most private body parts. My husband served 21 years in the military to secure freedom for all of us. TSA procedures spit on that service. This blog trumpets the fraction of shiny objects found in carry on luggage. It has never addressed what is found in bras and underpants. The only purpose of this policy is to frighten and demean travelers in order to maintain a bloated budget. I recommend everyone who visits this "blog" join the National Association of Airline Passengers and consider donating to organizations that are equipped to pressure and sue the TSA. Also, watch for opportunities to submit comments to Congressional subcommittees that assess TSA's performance. Write your representatives in the House and Senate. Judging from recent travels, there is growing movement to rein in what TSA calls a patdown and the rest of us call sexual assault.

Submitted by RB on

If the purpose of the TSA Blog is to communicate with the public why aren't the TSA bloggers able to answer questions? Isn't there a mechanism to ask entities within TSA to respond to blog questions. Or is the real purpose of the TSA blog to just blow smoke up our......?