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Transportation Security Administration

TSA Week In Review: May 28th - June 3rd

Tuesday, June 12, 2018
TSA discovered 97 firearms in carry-on bags around the nation. Of the 97 firearms discovered, 77 were loaded and 36 had a round chambered.

TSA discovered 97 firearms in carry-on bags around the nation. Of the 97 firearms discovered, 77 were loaded and 36 had a round chambered. Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. TSA may impose civil penalties of up to $13,066 per violation per person for prohibited items violations and violations of other TSA regulations. Repeat violations will result in higher penalties. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure. You can go here for more details on how to properly travel with your firearms in checked baggage.  Some airlines policies may differ from TSA’s. We strongly suggest travelers contact their airline for specific firearm and ammunition policies and to check local laws related to the carrying and transport of firearms. All of the firearms pictured were discovered over the last week. See complete lists below.

Left to right, the ammunition was discovered at  ICT, ICT, SBP, SBA, LGA and MSY

If packed properly, ammunition can be transported in checked-baggage. The ammunition pictured here is just a small sampling of ammunition discovered in carry-on bags last week. Left to right, the ammunition was discovered at  ICT, ICT, SBP, SBA, LGA and MSY. You can go here for more details on how to properly travel with ammunition in checked baggage.

The fireworks pictured here are just some of the fireworks discovered recently. Left to right, they were discovered at DTW, LAS, BTV, LAS and HNL.

As we approach Independence Day, it’s important to remember that fireworks are not allowed in either carry-on or checked bags. The fireworks pictured here are just some of the fireworks discovered recently. Left to right, they were discovered at DTW, LAS, BTV, LAS and HNL.

The fireworks pictured here are just some of the fireworks discovered recently. Left to right, they were discovered at DTW, LAS, BTV, LAS and HNL.

This bottle contained gasoline and was hidden in the lining of a checked bag at the Fort Lauderdale International Airport (FLL). Gasoline is strictly prohibited from both carry-on and checked bags.

From left to right, these prohibited items were discovered in carry-on bags at SBP, SAT, DEN, OMA, DEN, BUR, CMH, CLE, CMH, JFK, ATL, RDU, SBA, RDU, ATL and DEN .

From left to right, these prohibited items were discovered in carry-on bags at SBP, SAT, DEN, OMA, DEN, BUR, CMH, CLE, CMH, JFK, ATL, RDU, SBA, RDU, ATL and DEN . While these items are prohibited in carry-on bags, they may be packed in checked baggage. However, familiarize yourself with local laws as concealed weapons and martial arts weapons are illegal in parts of the U.S.

TSA discovered 97 firearms in carry-on bags around the nation. Of the 97 firearms discovered, 77 were loaded and 36 had a round chambered. Checkpoint and checked baggage screening acts as a deterrent to keep those with ill will from attempting to cause catastrophic damage to an aircraft. In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly in carry-on bags, our officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons, stun guns, small pocket knives and many other prohibited items too numerous to note.

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions; that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items.

If you haven’t read them yet, make sure you check out our year in review posts for 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016 and 2017.

And don’t forget to check out our top 10 most unusual finds videos for 2016 & 2017.

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Bob Burns

TSA Social Media

Comments

Submitted by Sm on

As always, absolutely nothing you needed your slow, invasive, and ineffective naked body scanners to detect. Meanwhile, how many people suffered physical searches thanks to false alarms on these useless machines?

Why are Curtis Burns and West Cooper unwilling to address, let alone answer, that question?

How many weeks has it been since you last trumpeted something dangerous you found with the naked body scanners?

Submitted by Patdown Or Assault? on

How is a passenger to determine whether a pat-down by TSA crosses the line into sexual assault?

Does any such line exist?

What should a passenger who is being sexually assaulted during a pat-down do?

Submitted by SSSS For Some Reason on

Gasoline?

Or Moonshine?

And it was in a checked bag so why does it matter? If there was nothing that would indicate it to be an IED why does it matter that it is in a checked bag?

Submitted by RB on

When you enter a TSA checkpoint, you consent to be searched. Consent, by legal definition, negates any claim of assault.

Submitted by Max Yost on

Exactly where can I find "Consent, by legal definition, negates any claim of assault." in the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations?

Submitted by The Original "RB" on

Submitted by RB on Sun, 2018-06-17 01:17
When you enter a TSA checkpoint, you consent to be searched. Consent, by legal definition, negates any claim of assault.
.................................................................

Giving consent for a search in no way equals giving consent to be abused. Only a sick person would try to suggest such. Probably a TSA employee making stupid comments.

Submitted by Common Sense on

Gasoline is flammable and explosive.

Submitted by Sim37 on

Not really sure why anyone would want to take 10-12 oz of gasoline in a hidden liner of their suitcase. This sounds to be nefarious to me. Gasoline is available everywhere in the world especially in such small quantities. Why take on an Airplane where it could be a danger if leaked or from a broken bottle. As an aviation Mechanic/Pilot a accelerant fire in a cargo hold is sure death.

Submitted by Sim37 on

Bob, answer me this, Why are the Guys and Gals at DEN never able to determine the Caliber, Make or Model of confiscated Firearms. If you need some to help give me a call. They obviously can find firearms but they can not read??? (all modern Firearms are marked with caliber, Make and model).

Submitted by Steve on

No one gets molested at a checkpoint, if they did then the said TSO would be fired. What a TSO does is use the back of the hand and explains the process in detail to every passenger (many items are hidden in the worst places). I like how people say oh look, you found nothing. See all those firearms? Would you like to get on planes with a passenger who has a loaded firearm? TSA strives to make sure the 4th Amendment is handled delicately, but also wants to ensure your safety. Being a TSO believe it or not is a hard and thankless job. The thanks that a TSO gets is that another 9/11 or Lockerbie hasn't happened again. So for the trolls on here every single week, I invite you to go to a nation with virtually no airline security and fly their airlines perhaps Somalia or Egypt. The fact that nothing happens everyday is proof that TSA works.

Submitted by Not TSAgent Steve on

Steve, this is what is SUPPOSED to happen at a checkpoint. Everyone knows that what is supposed to happen and what actually happens are sometimes greatly different things.

And the reason being a TSO is so thankless is because, well, you're violating that 4th amendment you so "delicately handle." Honor it completely, and there's nothing to be delicate about.

Submitted by Sven on

If you think TSA searches are abuse - then yes - you are giving that consent when entering the checkpoint. Entering a TSA checkpoint is voluntary and passengers should be aware of what to expect.

Submitted by Anonymous on

"Submitted by Steve on Mon, 2018-06-18 19:52
No one gets molested at a checkpoint, if they did then the said TSO would be fired. What a TSO does is use the back of the hand and explains the process in detail to every passenger (many items are hidden in the worst places). I like how people say oh look, you found nothing. See all those firearms? Would you like to get on planes with a passenger who has a loaded firearm? TSA strives to make sure the 4th Amendment is handled delicately, but also wants to ensure your safety. Being a TSO believe it or not is a hard and thankless job. The thanks that a TSO gets is that another 9/11 or Lockerbie hasn't happened again. So for the trolls on here every single week, I invite you to go to a nation with virtually no airline security and fly their airlines perhaps Somalia or Egypt. The fact that nothing happens everyday is proof that TSA works."

No, TSA screeners don't get fired for committing crimes like assault and lying. The guy who lied about Vanderklok to the court is still on the job.

In fact, screeners are rewarded for aggressive "pat downs". https://www.flyertalk.com/forum/29402034-post674.html

When TSA refuses to tell people that their genitals (TSA is too cowardly to use that word) will be touched and sometimes palmed or probed during a search and they lie about it, then one has NOT consented to a search. TSA lie: "…that contact with Plaintiff's genitals, if any at all, was incidental and occurred through the course of a typical security pat-down." tinyurl.com/y9ttb62p

Would you please tell us how many "dangerous items" TSA has found "hidden in the worst places"? Mike England claims it happens every single day and yet he refuses to substantiate that claim.

TSA commits sexual assault every single day on hundreds of people. It's sad that we have become a nation so afraid of terrorism that we allow this to continue.

And now it seems as if the TSA has finally admitted that it is looking for drugs: https://twitter.com/rjmaclean/status/1009205943437967360

Screen shot/DHS IG statement

Submitted by Hjslibrarylady on

Well said, Steve. Thank you for doing your job! Flight attendants have a thankless job, too. They are not flying waitresses, they are on the plane for your safety and just happen to serve drinks and snacks. Believe me when I say they are watching every move you make and assess you like a shark in bloody water. Thank you to any and all flight attendants who happen to read this!

Submitted by West Cooper on

SSSS sez - "

Gasoline?

Or Moonshine?

And it was in a checked bag so why does it matter? If there was nothing that would indicate it to be an IED why does it matter that it is in a checked bag?"

Gasoline has been prohibited for as long as I have been employed with TSA, due to the flammable nature, and the danger of fumes - in short, gasoline on a plane = bad idea.

TSA Blog Team

Submitted by Selective Responses on

West Cooper of the TSA Blog Team, why are you answering questions about gasoline while ignoring ones about the false positive rates on your primary screening technology and the line between a TSA patdown and sexual assault?

Submitted by Steve on

Yeah, many of your so-called facts are wrong. Have any terrorist attacks on aircraft occurred after 9/11 in the United States? No? You are welcome.

Submitted by Nocaps on

Submitted by West Cooper on Wed, 2018-06-20 12:01

SSSS sez - "

Gasoline?

Or Moonshine?

And it was in a checked bag so why does it matter? If there was nothing that would indicate it to be an IED why does it matter that it is in a checked bag?"

Gasoline has been prohibited for as long as I have been employed with TSA, due to the flammable nature, and the danger of fumes - in short, gasoline on a plane = bad idea.

TSA Blog Team

i believe that this falls under hazardous materials and the faa, if the moonshine is above a certain proof of alcohol it is not allowed either under these regulations. these regulations have been around long before tsa.

Submitted by Steve on

Not a TSO, btw. Anyway, flying isn't a right it is a privilege.

4th Amendment

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

When you arrive at a checkpoint in an airport, the probable cause is that a TSO doesn't know you from Adam to let you go on that flight without searching you first for the safety of the other passengers around him or her.

Submitted by Steve on

Thank you for putting up with it.

Submitted by Steve Is Confused on

Since 9/11, we've had a period before TSA was established, a period with TSA but without the shoe carnival, liquids farce, or body scanners, a period with shie and liquids nonsense but no scanners, and now with scanners and sexual assault patdowns. Since there were no terror attacks under ANY of these conditions, can we just go back to the way things were before TSA? Because clearly TSA and its nonsense are not deterring jack squat.

Submitted by SSSS For Some Reason on

Steve mistakenly claimed "...Anyway, flying isn't a right it is a privilege."

Irrelevant. The rights of the individual citizen still apply and are not suspended simply because the individual citizen has decided to contract an airline company to convey him from point a to point b. Subways and their use are not a right either but you wouldn't agree to TSA style checkpoints at every subway entrance, would you?

Continuing with the mistaken understanding of how rights work... " When you arrive at a checkpoint in an airport, the probable cause is that a TSO"

First, they are Agents.

Then, specifically, and this is critical, the rights of the individual citizen, specifically those protected by the fourth and fifth amendments in the Bill of Rights, apply specifically to 'the government.' If Delta wants to ask me to strip naked and be searched before boarding their aircraft, well it's their aircraft so it's their rules. If I prefer not to be strip-searched I can choose a different airlines. Not so with the TSA. I does not matter which airlines I chose to do business with I must interact with the TSA. And the TSA is 'the government.' And as 'the government' they are expressly prohibited from doing what they are doing which is violating my Fourth and Fifth Amendment Rights.

And then, wanting to travel from here to there using a specific form of transportation is not 'probable cause.' To try and claim that is specious at best, traitorous at worst.

And lastly, the only thing the TSA is actually authorized to do regarding airports and security is to disband.

Submitted by Susan Richart on

"Submitted by Steve on Thu, 2018-06-21 15:45
Not a TSO, btw. Anyway, flying isn't a right it is a privilege."

WRONG! "A citizen of the United States has a public RIGHT OF TRANSIT through the navigable airspace."...49 US Code-Section 40103 (2)

Submitted by Susan Richart on

Submitted by Sven on Wed, 2018-06-20 04:36
If you think TSA searches are abuse - then yes - you are giving that consent when entering the checkpoint. Entering a TSA checkpoint is voluntary and passengers should be aware of what to expect.

However, TSA fails to advise people that their genitals could be searched during a "pat down". They uses euphemisms such as groin or resistance for the term "genitals". If I am not told that my genitals will be searched and they are, I have not given consent to the search.

Submitted by Nocaps on

Submitted by SSSS For Some Reason on Mon, 2018-06-25 21:33 :
I does not matter which airlines I chose to do business with I must interact with the TSA.

i use netjets quite often and it is reasonably priced, there are no interactions with tsa and they have numerous airports around the country.
also, i believe that us courts have found that tsa screening is upheld in courts as "reasonable persons" would expect the screening that is given. as we have seen many times on here there are numerous "unreasonable persons" on here that take exception numerous things. this blog is basically alive to give a couple dozen at most individuals a platform to complain about the same things over and over. it is my opinion that us tax dollars, including mine, could be spent on better things.

Submitted by SSSS For Some Reason on

"... i believe that us courts have found that tsa screening is upheld in courts as"

Nope.

The courts upheld that security could xray your bag and have you walk through a metal detector because those were the least invasive methods of actually doing the job of security. And those standards were set a really long time before the TSA was a thing. Back in 1971, when the limited administrative search was instituted, the TSA wasn't even a dream in the politicians minds.

Submitted by Nocaps on

Submitted by SSSS For Some Reason on Sun, 2018-07-08 22:39
"... i believe that us courts have found that tsa screening is upheld in courts as"

Nope.

The courts upheld that security could xray your bag and have you walk through a metal detector because those were the least invasive methods of actually doing the job of security. And those standards were set a really long time before the TSA was a thing. Back in 1971, when the limited administrative search was instituted, the TSA wasn't even a dream in the politicians minds.

excellent editing of my post, as I said previously tsa was taken to court for illegal search and the judge ruled that a reasonable person would expect to be searched due to the signs posted. now a judge has ruled that tsa people cannot be sued for allegations of abuse. https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/tripping/wp/2018/07/11/tsa-agents-ca...