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Transportation Security Administration

TSA Week in Review - June 4th - 10th

Wednesday, June 20, 2018
This replica Improvised Explosive Device (IED) was in a traveler’s carry-on bag at the Chicago O’Hare International Airport (ORD).

This replica Improvised Explosive Device (IED) was in a traveler’s carry-on bag at the Chicago O’Hare International Airport (ORD). As a result, the checkpoint was closed for a total of 19 minutes before the Chicago Police Bomb Squad was able to respond and clear the item. When our officers spot a potential explosive on the X-ray monitor, they cannot just take the traveler’s word that the item is not real. A TSA Explosives Specialist or Police Department Bomb Squad must respond before the bag is ever opened. This can lead to costly evacuations, delays, and missed flights while explosives professionals determine whether the item is real or not. These types of items can lead to hefty fines and arrest.

TSA discovered 78 firearms in carry-on bags around the nation last week. Of the 78 firearms discovered, 61 were loaded and 25 had a round chambered.

TSA discovered 78 firearms in carry-on bags around the nation last week. Of the 78 firearms discovered, 61 were loaded and 25 had a round chambered. Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. TSA may impose civil penalties of up to $13,066 per violation per person for prohibited items violations and violations of other TSA regulations. Repeat violations will result in higher penalties. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure. You can go here for more details on how to properly travel with your firearms in checked baggage.  Some airlines policies may differ from TSA’s. We strongly suggest travelers contact their airline for specific firearm and ammunition policies and to check local laws related to the carrying and transport of firearms. All of the firearms pictured were discovered over the last week. See complete lists below.

From left to right, the ammunition pictured here was packed in carry-on bags at BUR, BWI, IAH, IAH, MDW and ORD.

If packed properly, ammunition can be transported in checked-baggage. From left to right, the ammunition pictured here was packed in carry-on bags at BUR, BWI, IAH, IAH, MDW and ORD. You can go here for more details on how to properly travel with ammunition in checked baggage.

From left to right, these prohibited items were discovered in carry-on bags at BOI, BDL, BNA, CLE, CLE, CLE, BHM, IAH, ORD, ORD, SAT, SJC and TUL.

From left to right, these prohibited items were discovered in carry-on bags at BOI, BDL, BNA, CLE, CLE, CLE, BHM, IAH, ORD, ORD, SAT, SJC and TUL. While these items are prohibited in carry-on bags, they may be packed in checked baggage. However, familiarize yourself with local laws as concealed weapons and martial arts weapons are illegal in parts of the U.S.

TSA discovered 78 firearms in carry-on bags around the nation last week. Of the 78 firearms discovered, 61 were loaded and 25 had a round chambered. Checkpoint and checked baggage screening acts as a deterrent to keep those with ill will from attempting to cause catastrophic damage to an aircraft. In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly in carry-on bags, our officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons, stun guns, small pocket knives and many other prohibited items too numerous to note.

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions; that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items.

If you haven’t read them yet, make sure you check out our year in review posts for 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016 and 2017.

And don’t forget to check out our top 10 most unusual finds videos for 2016 & 2017.

Follow @TSA on Twitter and Instagram and Like Us on Facebook. Have a question? Ask TSA on Twitter or Facebook Messenger

Bob Burns

TSA Social Media

Comments

Submitted by Tn on

As always, absolutely nothing you needed your slow, invasive, and ineffective naked body scanners to detect. Meanwhile, how many people suffered physical searches thanks to false alarms on these useless machines?

Why are Curtis Burns and West Cooper unwilling to address, let alone answer, that question?

How many weeks has it been since you last trumpeted something dangerous you found with the naked body scanners?

Submitted by Patdown Or Assault? on

How is a passenger to determine whether a pat-down by TSA crosses the line into sexual assault?

Does any such line exist?

What should a passenger who is being sexually assaulted during a pat-down do?

Submitted by Charles JOhn on

Thanks for keeping our lives safer, keep up the good work folks!

Submitted by ADB on

I don't know if I am reassured or unsettled about the fact that MIA didn't appear on this period's recap of weapons found.

Submitted by Steve on

No one gets molested at a checkpoint, if they did then the said TSO would be fired. What a TSO does is use the back of the hand and explains the process in detail to every passenger (many items are hidden in the worst places). I like how people say oh look, you found nothing. See all those firearms? Would you like to get on planes with a passenger who has a loaded firearm? TSA strives to make sure the 4th Amendment is handled delicately but also wants to ensure your safety. Being a TSO believe it or not is a hard and thankless job. The thanks that a TSO gets is that another 9/11 or Lockerbie hasn't happened again. So for the trolls on here every single week, I invite you to go to a nation with virtually no airline security and fly their airlines perhaps Somalia or Egypt. The fact that nothing happens every day is proof that TSA works. So much complaining over such a small part of the traveling experience.

Also thank a Flight Attendant, their jobs are rough as well.

Submitted by Anonymous on

As always, absolutely nothing you say makes sense, how many weeks/months/years has it been since you came up with something new.

Submitted by Nocaps on

just saw a story about a woman getting her stun gun through security in san francisco. how have the private security companies compared to tsa when it comes to finding wei?

Submitted by RB on

It's a Patdown not Assault. You can stop trolling now.

Submitted by Steve Is Not Te... on

No, TSA screeners don't get fired for committing crimes like assault and lying. The guy who lied about Vanderklok to the court is still on the job.

In fact, screeners are rewarded for aggressive "pat downs". https://www.flyertalk.com/forum/29402034-post674.html

When TSA refuses to tell people that their genitals (TSA is too cowardly to use that word) will be touched and sometimes palmed or probed during a search and they lie about it, then one has NOT consented to a search. TSA lie: "…that contact with Plaintiff's genitals, if any at all, was incidental and occurred through the course of a typical security pat-down." tinyurl.com/y9ttb62p

Would you please tell us how many "dangerous items" TSA has found "hidden in the worst places"? Mike England claims it happens every single day and yet he refuses to substantiate that claim.

TSA commits sexual assault every single day on hundreds of people. It's sad that we have become a nation so afraid of terrorism that we allow this to continue.

Submitted by SSSS For Some Reason on

This replica ACME Bomb was found in the carry-on bag of a traveler named Wil E. Coyote.

And still didn't need the big, expensive, nudie-scanners to find it, did you?

Submitted by Susan Richart on

Ah West or whoever approved comments this week:

The comment attributed to " Steve Is Not Te.." was written and submitted by me on June 20, not June 24. Thank goodness that I keep screen shots of my comments.

This leads me to wonder if moderators might be manipulating comments. Are you doing so?

screen shot/DHS IG comment

screen

Submitted by West Cooper on

Susan sez - "

Ah West or whoever approved comments this week:

The comment attributed to " Steve Is Not Te.." was written and submitted by me on June 20, not June 24. Thank goodness that I keep screen shots of my comments.

This leads me to wonder if moderators might be manipulating comments. Are you doing so?

screen shot/DHS IG comment

screen"

Comments are approved in the order that they come in. *Sometimes* it takes longer to get the comments moderated (because all Blog team members have other job responsibilities), however, we do not change them or modify them in any way - to include the dates given to the comment by the system.

TSA Blog Team

Submitted by The Original "RB" on

Submitted by West Cooper on Tue, 2018-06-26 11:31
Susan sez - "

Ah West or whoever approved comments this week:

The comment attributed to " Steve Is Not Te.." was written and submitted by me on June 20, not June 24. Thank goodness that I keep screen shots of my comments.

This leads me to wonder if moderators might be manipulating comments. Are you doing so?

screen shot/DHS IG comment

screen"

Comments are approved in the order that they come in. *Sometimes* it takes longer to get the comments moderated (becasue all Blog team members have other job responsbilities), however, we do not change them or modify them in any way - to include the dates given to the comment by the system.

TSA Blog Team

.................................................

Susan is saying that her name was removed and some other name was substituted on her post. And further asserts that the date was changed. Does TSA deny that those changes happened? I bet Susan can submit a screen shot to the IG showing the date and time that file was created.

You say that all blog team members have other jobs. We know that, but exactly how many blog team members are there? TSA only acknowledges two. Is that number another TSA lie?

Even then is it really that hard to moderate the blog for a few minutes each day instead of going for a week or so at a time without doing any moderation? Can't the (however many TSA bloggers there really are) coordinate and work with each other to ensure the blog is maintained or isn't it done like that at your airport?

Submitted by The Original "RB" on 6/26/18 @ 12:30 CST.
MAGA

Submitted by Selective Responses on

West, why are you ignoring questions about patdowns and sexual assault? Surely if there's no similarity between the two this would be a simple question for you to answer.

Submitted by Susan Richart on

"Comments are approved in the order that they come in. *Sometimes* it takes longer to get the comments moderated (becasue all Blog team members have other job responsbilities), however, we do not change them or modify them in any way - to include the dates given to the comment by the system.

TSA Blog Team"

Then please explain how my comment submitted June 20th appeared with someone else's name and the date of June 24th. It didn't happen by magic.

Submitted by Susan Richart on

"Comments are approved in the order that they come in. *Sometimes* it takes longer to get the comments moderated (becasue all Blog team members have other job responsbilities), however, we do not change them or modify them in any way - to include the dates given to the comment by the system.

TSA Blog Team"

I found my original comment but it is attributed to "Anonymous". I never submit comments anonymously. The comment in this week's edition of the Weekly Reader Roundup of Gun was apparently copied and pasted by a reader.

Submitted by Cris Howard on

You people are disgusting.

Submitted by West Cooper on

RB sez - "Susan is saying that her name was removed and some other name was substituted on her post. And further asserts that the date was changed. Does TSA deny that those changes happened? I bet Susan can submit a screen shot to the IG showing the date and time that file was created."

I will state again -

Comments are approved in the order that they come in. *Sometimes* it takes longer to get the comments moderated (because all Blog team members have other job responsibilities), however, we do not change them or modify them in any way - to include the dates given to the comment by the system.

TSA Blog Team

Submitted by Common Sense 101 on

*yawn*

Submitted by Susan Richart on

"Submitted by Cris Howard on Wed, 2018-06-27 07:44
You people are disgusting."

This is the woman who sobbed during a video describing a strip search by TSA wherein she was forced to remove her slacks and her underwear.

Submitted by Nocaps on

"Submitted by Susan Richart on Mon, 2018-07-02 14:30

"Submitted by Cris Howard on Wed, 2018-06-27 07:44
You people are disgusting."

This is the woman who sobbed during a video describing a strip search by TSA wherein she was forced to remove her slacks and her underwear.

how do you know this?