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Official website of the Department of Homeland Security

Transportation Security Administration

TSA on the Job: Aviation Transportation Security Inspector

Monday, August 20, 2018
Aviation Security Inspector

As a TSA Transportation Security Inspector for aviation at John F. Kennedy International Airport, I conduct inspections, assessments and investigations of airlines and individuals to determine how well they comply with regulations as well as identifying areas of potential vulnerabilities that need to be addressed.

I can use a variety of methods to determine compliance which may include surveillance, interviews, document reviews, and testing.

The inspector job is both a desk job and a field job – and that variety is something I enjoy.

While at my desk, I’m going through paperwork dotting i's and crossing t’s, making sure our traveling partners have all their paperwork in compliance.

For example, improperly completed documents aren’t exciting or dangerous, but attention to details, such as the correct spelling of an employee’s name or a properly completed manifest are key to making sure only authorized personnel are working in and around our aircraft. That’s only one of the many tasks I may find myself doing at JFK– and if you’ve never been here, trust me when I say this is a big place. There are more than 120 domestic and international airlines carrying over 50-million passengers a year.

When I’m out in the field, I’m often aboard an aircraft observing procedures and making sure everyone is doing their part in maintaining aviation security. I take this personally and I am fully committed to our mission of protecting the nation's transportation systems.

TSA, airports, and airlines have many security conscious and vigilant employees, but just as in any security profession, you need somebody like me and the other inspectors around the nation working behind the scenes to ensure the security effectiveness of the transportation system.

Horace Anderson - TSA Transportation Security Inspector, Aviation

Comments

Submitted by Hmm on

Didn't a bunch of TSIs break a bunch of planes a while back because they had no idea what they were doing?

TSA's poorly trained, unprofessional workforce at work!

Submitted by The Original "RB" on

I take what TSA employees do too since most of it is a violation of civil rights and anti-American.

Submitted by SSSS For Some Reason on

"...When I’m out in the field, I’m often aboard an aircraft observing procedures and making sure everyone is doing their part in maintaining aviation security. "

Did you just admit that the actual security part of TSA is being done by everyone else?

Submitted by Truthsayer on

You reveal your own ignorance with this comment. Like any other regulatory oversight agency, there are procedures that TSA ensures are happening. FAA, DOT, USDA, and many other oversight bodies do the same with other safety and security requirements.

Submitted by SuperWittySmitty on

Actually, one officer made a very stupid mistake; it wasn't the organization. As an American, I'm proud of what the TSA has done for airport security and in all my TSA encounters, I've had nothing to complain about. The ones I've met were friendly and professional. I'll bet if there were an option to fly on a plane filled with TSA-screened passengers or on a plane filled with unscreened passengers, you'd choose the one screened by the TSA. I know your type and you are just a lot of negativity and emptiness.

Submitted by Bob M on

What happened to “modererated blog” and “no personal attacks” or doesn’t that apply
to TSA boosters?

Submitted by Dean Weingarten on

Thank you for the insight into your job, and what you do. Writing an article takes time and effort. You did a well.

I find insight into other people's work worthwhile.

Submitted by BR549 on

Wow...you had to dig back to something that was 10 years old. Obviously this issue was taken care of, as we haven't heard of issues like this since. BTW, they weren't fined due to the planes being broken, they were looking into it, as the planes were deemed accessible to anyone, which they shouldn't have been. Read the article...

Submitted by Max Yost on

How do you know that "this issue was taken care of"? Of course I read the article. Did you? It sounds as if you're the one with the reading comprehension problem.

Submitted by SSSS For Some Reason on

"... I'll bet if there were an option to fly on a plane filled with TSA-screened passengers or on a plane filled with unscreened passengers,"

From which airport can I get on this mythical plane without TSA interference? And how do I get my airport to start offering a TSA free option?

Submitted by T on

Then stop flying and go find other means of traveling or? you can join the Agency and help fix problems instead of being a negative nancy.

Submitted by The Original "RB" on

Submitted by T on Tue, 2018-08-28 18:30
Then stop flying and go find other means of traveling or? you can join the Agency and help fix problems instead of being a negative nancy.

**********************************

Can't speak for others but I have more respect for myself than to ever wear a TSA uniform. I will work to fix TSA by using what little influence I have to pressure my elected representatives to correct their earlier mistake and dismantle TSA.

And a separate question, why don't these guest bloggers ever answer questions that are submitted by readers of this blog?

Submitted by SSSS For Some Reason on

Submitted by T on Tue, 2018-08-28 18:30 "...Then stop flying and go find other means of traveling "

You have it the wrong way around.... if you can't handle the very minimal risk of air travel without having an eight-billion-dollar a year agency tell you it's ok and that they will protect you from the bad people then maybe it is you who should find a different means of travel and leave the skies to the adults.

Submitted by Nope on

"I'll bet if there were an option to fly on a plane filled with TSA-screened passengers or on a plane filled with unscreened passengers, you'd choose the one screened by the TSA."

I would pay extra -- a LOT extra -- to not have to worry about being terrorized by you. Thanks for the Sexual Assault?

Submitted by Nocaps on

Submitted by SSSS For Some Reason on Mon, 2018-08-27 17:12

"... I'll bet if there were an option to fly on a plane filled with TSA-screened passengers or on a plane filled with unscreened passengers,"

From which airport can I get on this mythical plane without TSA interference? And how do I get my airport to start offering a TSA free option?

there are many private companies, like netjets, that fly around the world that do not have security screening.

Submitted by SSSS For Some Reason on

Submitted by Nocaps on Thu, 2018-08-30 04:49

"...there are many private companies, like netjets, that fly around the world that do not have security screening."

You just proved how completely useless the TSA is with your statement. If there are so many terrorists just waiting to sneak past the TSA so they can do something horrible with an aircraft why aren't they bypassing the TSA all together and using private companies aircraft that get to bypass TSA all together?

Either the terrorists are trying to attack aviation or they aren't? You only get to chose one so chose wisely.

Submitted by Anonymous on

Thank you for what you do Horace!!!

Submitted by Max Yost on

Yep -- Continuing the historic legacy of damaging airplanes. Horace should be proud.

Submitted by Nocaps on

Submitted by Nocaps on Thu, 2018-08-30 04:49

"...there are many private companies, like netjets, that fly around the world that do not have security screening."

You just proved how completely useless the TSA is with your statement. If there are so many terrorists just waiting to sneak past the TSA so they can do something horrible with an aircraft why aren't they bypassing the TSA all together and using private companies aircraft that get to bypass TSA all together?

Either the terrorists are trying to attack aviation or they aren't? You only get to chose one so chose wisely.

wrong, they have been successful at attacking aviation around the world, not in the us. there was one in somalia a couple of years ago.

Submitted by SSSS For Some Reason on

"...wrong, they have been successful at attacking aviation around the world, not in the us."

except those same attackers can just charter a private jet thereby completely bypassing the TSA so why aren't there any reports of these attackers doing exactly that?

Submitted by Nocaps on

Submitted by SSSS For Some Reason on Mon, 2018-09-17 05:42
"...wrong, they have been successful at attacking aviation around the world, not in the us."

except those same attackers can just charter a private jet thereby completely bypassing the TSA so why aren't there any reports of these attackers doing exactly that?

the same ones? they have to get to the us first. second my opinion is that it would not serve their agenda if they did not go after commercial planes. there are 1000s of non-commercial planes that fly the skies of the us every day, there have been instances of people using them as weapons; i believe an example is a person that flew his private plane into his own house not that long ago in utah. it was merely a blurb on most news outlets for a day or two. if the 9/11 terrorists did this on 9/11/01 then it would not have served their agenda. so to answer your question, it doesn't suit their needs.